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Shi

Shi or shi may refer to:

Shi (poetry)

Shi and shih are romanizations of the character or , the Chinese word for all poetry generally and across all languages.

In Western analysis of the styles of Chinese poetry, shi is also used as a term of art for a specific poetic tradition, modeled after the Old Chinese works collected in the Confucian Classic of Poetry. This anthology included both aristocratic poems (the " Hymns" and " Eulogies") and more rustic works believed to have derived from Huaxia folk songs (the " Odes"). They are composed in ancient Chinese, mostly in four- character lines. In such analysis, "shi" poetry is contrasted with other forms such as the Chu-derived " ci" and the Han-era " fu". This use is not common within Chinese literature, however, which instead classifies these poems into other categories such as " classical Chinese poetry", "Field and Garden" poetry, and "curtailed" poetry.

Shi (comics)

Shi (Ana Ishikawa) is a fictional comic book character created by writer/illustrator William Tucci. She first appeared in Razor Annual #1 (1993), and has since appeared in books by a variety of publishers, most notably, Tucci's company, Crusade Comics. Shi is a young woman of mixed Japanese and American ancestry drafted into a modern-day "shadow war" between descendents of the infamous sohei warrior monks of medieval Japan. As the story is deeply rooted in Japanese history and mythology, "Shi" literally translates to death (死) in Japanese, and her signature weapon is the naginata.

The series is known for its scenes of stylized violence, and originated during an American comics publishing fad sometimes called " bad girl comics". The series often touches on spiritual issues, especially as they pertain to Ana's dual background in the traditions of the yamabushi warrior monks, and Christianity.

Shi (surname)

Shi ) is the romanization of several Chinese surnames, including 石, 史, 師, 時, 士, 釋, and 施. Several of these are common Chinese surnames. As with other surnames in Asian cultures, the surname is written before the given name.

Shi (personator)

The shi was a ceremonial "personator" who represented a dead relative during ancient Chinese ancestral sacrifices. In a shi ceremony, the ancestral spirit supposedly would enter the descendant "corpse" personator, who would eat and drink sacrificial offerings and convey messages from the spirit. James Legge (1895 IV:135), an early translator of the Chinese classics, described shi personation ceremonies as "grand family reunions where the dead and the living met, eating and drinking together, where the living worshipped the dead, and the dead blessed the living." In modern terms, this ancient Chinese shi practice would be described as necromancy, mediumship, or spirit possession.

Shi (kana)

, in hiragana, or in katakana, is one of the Japanese kana, which each represent one mora. Both represent the phoneme although for phonological reasons, the actual pronunciation is . The shapes of these kana have origins in the character 之. The katakana form has become increasingly popular as an emoticon in the Western world due to its resemblance to a smiling face, thus this variant form ㋛ was created.

This character may be combined with a dakuten, forming じ in hiragana, ジ in katakana, and ji in Hepburn romanization; the pronunciation becomes (phonetically or in the middle of words).

The dakuten form of this character is used when transliterating "di" occasionally, as opposed to チ's dakuten form; for example, Aladdin is written as アラジン Arajin, and radio is written as ラジオ.

In the Ainu language, シ is used to represent the sound. It can also be written as a small ㇱ to represent a final s sound, pronounced .

Form

Rōmaji

Hiragana

Katakana

normal

sh/s- alone
(さ行 sa-gyō)

final sh (s)
shi (si)
shii (sii)
shī (), shih (sih)

 

しい, しぃ
しー

sh/(s)- and yōon
(しゃ行 sha-gyō)

sha (sa)
shaa (saa)
shah (sah)
shā ()

しゃ
しゃあ
 
しゃー

シャ
シャア
シャㇵ
シャー

shu (su)
shuu (suu)
shū (), shuh (suh)

しゅ
しゅう
しゅー

シュ
シュウ
シュー

she (se)
shee (see)
shē (), sheh (seh)

しぇ
しぇう
しぇー

シェ
シェウ
シェー

sho (so)
shou (sou)
shoo (soo)
shō (), shoh (soh)

しょ
しょう
しょお
しょー

ショ
ショウ
ショオ
ショー

with dakuten

j/(d)/z- alone
(ザ行 za-gyō)

final -j (-d), -z
ji (di), zi
jii (dii), zii
(), , jih (dih), zih

 

じい, じぃ
じー

j/(d)/z- and yōon
(じゃ行 ja-gyō)

ja (da), za
jaa (daa), zaa
(), , jah (dah), zah

じゃ
じゃあ
じゃー

ジャ
ジャア
ジャー

ju (du), zu
juu (duu), zuu
(), , juh (duh), zuh

じゅ
じゅう
じゅー

ジュ
ジュウ
ジュー

je (de), ze
jee (dee), zee
(), , jeh (deh), zeh

じぇ
じぇう
じぇー

ジェ
ジェウ
ジェー

jo (do), zo
jou (dou), zou
joo (doo), zoo
(), , joh (doh), zoh

じょ
じょう
じょお
じょー

ジョ
ジョウ
ジョオ
ジョー

Other additional forms

Romaji

Hiragana

Katakana

shyi

しぃ

シィ

Wiktionary

shi

pron. (context neologism furry fandom English) (alternative form of sie English)

Usage examples of "shi".

He knew that he lay here in the battle-wrecked frontier village of Yen Shi, that he had drunk too much to forget the doom that stared him and his companions in the face, that fatigue and too much liquor were doing this to him.

Nelson had a second to remember that Tark had seen grenades in action in Yen Shi before his own grenade exploded.

It seemed to Nelson that time had doubled back upon itself and that he lay again in the squalid inn in Yen Shi as he had lain that night he had first heard the thought-voices in his dreams.

It was strange to hear his name from her lips and to remember that night in Yen Shi when he had told it to her between kisses.