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Seve

Seve may refer to:

People:

  • Seve Ballesteros (1957–2011), Spanish golfer
  • Seve Benson (born 1986), English golfer
  • Seve Paeniu (born 1965), Tuvaluan diplomat
  • Alfred De Sève (1858-1927), Canadian violinist, composer and music educator
  • Jacques de Sève (fl. 1742–1788), French illustrator
  • Peter de Sève, American illustrator and animation character designer

Other uses:

  • Ševe, a secret police organization in Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Seve Dam, Turkey
  • Seve Trophy, a European golf tournament, named after the Spanish golfer

Usage examples of "seve".

You just forget about old Seve tomorrow and keep your eye on the All-American Kid.

And your buddy Seve Ballesteros is going to show up, muttering in Spanish under his breath and plowing right through everybody who gets in his way.

Dallie used to like Seve, until Francesca had started making cracks about how good looking he was.

Standing there in a bright red dress that looked like underwear, and smiling at Seve like he was some sort of Spanish god, was Miss Fancy Pants herself.

Francesca finally tore her attention away from Seve and looked toward Dallie.

Dallie began to stalk toward her to choke her to death, but he had to stop because Seve was coming toward him, hand extended, all flashing eyes and Latin charm.

Dallie thought he saw Seve sneak a look at Francesca before he teed up.

Birgitte was leading Jaril and Seve to their mother, keeping her out of it.

Jaril and Seve stared at him silently, hardly blinking, and held on to each other.

That was not what she had come to ask, but Seve and Jaril made it an excellent question.

Jaril and Seve stared at the woman in her odd wide yellow trousers and short dark coat, but they showed no more reaction than that.

Through a window cemented open by decades of city soot, Seve could hear the swift, musical jabber of Cantonese, its broad sentence-ending interrogatives like a song of the sea.

The monk that was Seve was disconnected from the many quotidian normalcies of life—the loves of family and friends had taken a backseat.