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Şerif

Şerif is a Turkish name. Notable people with the name include:

Serif (disambiguation)

A serif is a decorative detail on letters and other typographical symbols.

Serif may also refer to:

  • Şərif, a municipality in Balakan Rayon, Azerbaijan
  • Serif Europe, a software company specialising in creative software
  • Serif DrawPlus, a vector graphics editor
  • Serif PagePlus, a desk-top publishing program
  • Seraph, Character featured in " The Matrix Reloaded"
  • Şerif, Turkish name
  • Serif (publisher), an Independent publishing company based in London
  • San Serriffe, a typographical hoax.

Serif (publisher)

Serif is an independent book publishing house based in London, UK, founded in 1992 by Stephen Hayward (1954–2015).

The company's list covers the subjects of history, politics, travel, culture and fiction, with book jackets — described as "works of art in themselves" — designed by Pentagram Berlin. Alongside original titles, reissues feature prominently in Serif's output, including Evelyn Waugh's 1932 account of his travels in Guiana and Brazil, 92 Days (with an afterword by Pauline Melville), George Dangerfield's The Strange Death of Liberal England, Norman Cohn's Warrant for Genocide, Jorge Semprún's The Cattle Truck, works by J. M. Synge, as well as significant cookery books such as The Alice B. Toklas Cookbook and the Glenfiddich Award-winning titles by Édouard de Pomiane, Cooking in Ten Minutes and Cooking with Pomiane. Among other authors published by Serif are Steve Aylett, Chitrita Banerji, Frances Bissell, Gerald Brenan, E. H. Carr, Nuruddin Farah, Chenjerai Hove, Federico García Lorca and George Rudé. Primarily a publisher of printed books, Serif began producing e-books in 2012.

Subsequent to Hayward's death in October 2015, it was announced in April 2016 that Serif had been acquired by OR Books, whose co-founder Colin Robinson said: "I knew Serif’s founder and publisher, Stephen Hayward, over many years. I always admired his approach to publishing and share his commitment to progressive books. We're delighted to be able to bring the Serif list under OR's wing and aim to develop the imprint in the adventurous, lively spirit with which Stephen ran it."

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

serif

noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
sans serif
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Firstly, the text will generally look better in a serif face, especially if there is a lot of it.
▪ The buttons for each floor were round and prominent, like discoloured eyeballs, with serif numbers as pupils.
▪ The sentence I had just written in a staid serif typeface suddenly was pushed leeward.
▪ The variation between the two creates interest and, anyway, serif faces are easier to read in large quantities.
Wiktionary

serif

n. (context typography English) A short line added to the tops and bottoms of traditional typefaces, such as ''Times New Roman''.

WordNet

serif

n. a short line at the end of the main strokes of a character [syn: seriph]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

serif

in typography, 1841, earlier ceref (1827); see sans-serif.

Usage examples of "serif".

The writing was as legible as if it had been typeset, each letter shod and gloved with serifs, the parentheses neatly crimped, the wavy hyphens like stylized bolts of lightning.

While the dead tree book uses a font with serifs, Verdana and other sans-serif fonts cause less eyestrain when reading from a CRT or other types of computer displays.

It's in an aggressively modern building of glass and steel and concrete with its owner's name in bevelled aluminium sans serifs above the revolving door at the front.