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Serge (fabric)

Serge is a type of twill fabric that has diagonal lines or ridges on both sides, made with a two-up, two-down weave. The worsted variety is used in making military uniforms, suits, great coats and trench coats. Its counterpart, silk serge, is used for linings. French serge is a softer, finer variety. The word is also used for a high quality woolen woven fabric.

Serge (Konovaloff)

Sergius of Evkarpia (born Serge Konovalov: July 8, 1941 in Leuven, Belgium – January 22, 2003 in Paris, France) was an Eastern Orthodox archbishop of the Ecumenical Patriarchate who led the Patriarchal Exarchate for Orthodox Parishes of Russian Tradition in Western Europe from 1993 to 2003.

Educated at the University of Louvain, he was ordained as a married deacon in 1968, and became a priest in 1980. Following the death of his wife, by whom he had three children, he became a monk in 1990. In the same year he was elected to be the successor of the late Archbishop George Wagner as head of the exarchate. He was consecrated bishop in Paris on June 27, 1993. He died in Paris on January 22, 2003.

Serge

Serge may refer to:

  • Serge (fabric), a type of twill fabric
  • Serge (name), a masculine given name with many variants (e.g., Sergio, Sergei)
  • Serge synthesizer, a modular synthesizer

Serge (llama)

Serge the llama (born 29 June 2005, Saint-Nazaire) is a llama in the circus Cirque Franco-Italien of John Beautour and internet meme. Serge was named after the French singer Serge Lama, who described the choice of name as "genius".

During the night of 30 to 31 October, while the circus was performing in Bordeaux, the llama was taken from its cage by a group of five youths returning from a disco. They took the llama out for a walk, posted some pictures on social media, and took it on a tram. The five were arrested by the police and Serge was returned to his owner, unharmed.

Initially the circus director John Beautour pressed charges. However, the photos went viral on the internet, leading to a lot of publicity for the circus. Beautour subsequently dropped the charges.

The llama, now a celebrity, was bookable for parties at 1200 euros per event, and appeared as a mascot at soccer games.

A parody Stromae's song Papaoutai "Lamaoutai" was viewed more than 4 million times on YouTube. The parody was made with the cooperation of the circus and Serge himself.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

serge

noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
blue
▪ His blue serge trousers were too heavy for this weather.
▪ So far, no blue serge suits, either, whatever serge is.
▪ Gwendolen was clad in her dark blue serge travelling dress, this being the nearest to mourning she could manage.
▪ He was wearing dark trousers and a blue serge shirt with a yoke across the front.
▪ In Mespot you were allowed to purchase a bolt of blue serge and have the squadron tailor make up your uniform.
▪ He was wearing his blue serge suit, white shirt, and necktie, and looked all right to me.
▪ Oliver was dashing in blue serge, Samuel Pipkin pumpkin-like in large enveloping flannel.
▪ Loch Craig existed, as did the newts, Donald's blue serge suit and Simon's dictionary.
■ NOUN
suit
▪ Loch Craig existed, as did the newts, Donald's blue serge suit and Simon's dictionary.
▪ He was wearing his blue serge suit, white shirt, and necktie, and looked all right to me.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Gwendolen was clad in her dark blue serge travelling dress, this being the nearest to mourning she could manage.
▪ He was wearing dark trousers and a blue serge shirt with a yoke across the front.
▪ He was wearing his blue serge suit, white shirt, and necktie, and looked all right to me.
▪ His blue serge trousers were too heavy for this weather.
▪ Léonie lifted her head from her partner's serge shoulder and stared about.
▪ Should she don her heavier serge walking dress or be optimistic and wear the foulard she had planned?
▪ So far, no blue serge suits, either, whatever serge is.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Serge

Serge \Serge\, n. [F. serge, sarge, originally, a silken stuff, fr. L. serica, f. or neut. pl. of sericus silken. See Sericeous, Silk.] A woolen twilled stuff, much used as material for clothing for both sexes.

Silk serge, a twilled silk fabric used mostly by tailors for lining parts of gentlemen's coats.

Serge

Serge \Serge\, n. [F. cierge.] A large wax candle used in the ceremonies of various churches.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

serge

late 14c., from Old French serge (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *sarica, in Medieval Latin "cloth of wool mixed with silk or linen," from Latin serica (vestis) "silken (garment)," from serica, from Greek serike, fem. of serikos "silken" (see silk). The French word is the source of German sarsche, Danish sarge, etc.

Wiktionary

serge

Etymology 1 n. 1 A type of worsted cloth. 2 (context by metonymy English) A garment made of this fabric. vb. (context sewing English) To overlock. Etymology 2

n. A large wax candle used in some church ceremony.

WordNet

serge

n. a twilled woolen fabric

Usage examples of "serge".

Here, too, were the fierce men from the Mendips, the wild hunters from Porlock Quay and Minehead, the poachers of Exmoor, the shaggy marshmen of Axbridge, the mountain men from the Quantocks, the serge and wool-workers of Devonshire, the graziers of Bampton, the red-coats from the Militia, the stout burghers of Taunton, and then, as the very bone and sinew of all, the brave smockfrocked peasants of the plains, who had turned up their jackets to the elbow, and exposed their brown and corded arms, as was their wont when good work had to be done.

Behind them were musqueteers from Dorchester, pikemen from Newton Poppleford, and a body of stout infantry from among the serge workers of Ottery St.

More gold paint on the side of the bed, paint overspray on the walls and curtains, a film of dried gold dust on the furniture, and gold footprints on the carpet, leading back to Serge, reading the label on the can of gold spray paint in his hand.

By this heaven, I wonder at nothing more than our gentlemen ushers, that will suffer a piece of serge or perpetuana to come into the presence: methinks they should, out of their experience, better distinguish the silken disposition of courtiers, than to let such terrible coarse rags mix with us, able to fret any smooth or gentle society to the threads with their rubbing devices.

Serge took pictures of the concrete red-black-and-yellow buoy that marked the southernmost point, which he had photographed the night before.

He took a sip from his sportster bottle and tapped Serge on the shoulder.

The odd unshapeliness of their ill-built bodies in their ill-fitting clothes, the stained and streaky blue of the badly-dyed serge, and the shallow, vibrating magenta of the ribbon made it very fitting that they should stand in the foreground of the mean winter day which had coloured the farmyard and its buildings sour, soiled tones of grey.

Turkish honey make threads: so stretched the boys, or stoppers -- Wolf, Marcel, Schmitt, Serge, Gotti, Eberhard, and Bastian.

Here, too, were the fierce men from the Mendips, the wild hunters from Porlock Quay and Minehead, the poachers of Exmoor, the shaggy marshmen of Axbridge, the mountain men from the Quantocks, the serge and wool-workers of Devonshire, the graziers of Bampton, the red-coats from the Militia, the stout burghers of Taunton, and then, as the very bone and sinew of all, the brave smockfrocked peasants of the plains, who had turned up their jackets to the elbow, and exposed their brown and corded arms, as was their wont when good work had to be done.

The Count wore his fighting clothes, the formfitting tunic and pants of patchy strawberry serge.

When I am frumpily proper in serge and wool, she decided, I will enjoy my silk all the more.

Barton James of number one Harmony avenue, Donnybrook, on which sat a fare, a young gentleman, stylishly dressed in an indigoblue serge suit made by George Robert Mesias, tailor and cutter, of number five Eden quay, and wearing a straw hat very dressy, bought of John Plasto of number one Great Brunswick street, hatter.

America, I am indebted to Mary Culnane and Joe Morganti, Serge Petroff and Hiro Sato, Irwin Scheiner and Cecil Uyehara.

As he looked out toward the audience in the Friedman Auditorium, named after his former boss, his mind no doubt skipped back in time, back to that hot, sticky, June afternoon in 1930 when he walked into the dim vault, dressed in his white suede shoes and blue serge jacket, and first learned the secrets of the Black Chamber.

His dress was like that of a fisherman, consisting of blue serge trowsers, a shirt striped blue and white, and a Guernsey frock, which he carried flung across his shoulder.