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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

send

verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be sent for trial (also be committed for trial British English)
▪ Smith's lawyer battled to stop him being sent for trial in Britain.
be sent into action
▪ He declared that French soldiers will not be sent into action in Iraq.
be sent into exile
▪ The old leaders were removed from power and sent into exile.
hand/pass/give/send out a leaflet
▪ Students were handing out election leaflets at the station.
send a donation
▪ Please help our campaign by sending a donation to Friends of the Earth.
send a letter
▪ The school sent a letter to all the children’s parents.
send a message
▪ My mum just sent me a text message.
send in troops
▪ Johnson wanted to win the war without sending in American ground troops.
send mail
▪ Please do not send personal mail to my work address.
send (off) for details (=write asking for information)
▪ Why don't you send for details of the course?
send out...search party
▪ Let’s get going or they’ll send out a search party.
send (out)/transmit a signal
▪ The signals are transmitted via satellites.
send sb a file (=send it using email)
▪ Do you want me to send you the file?
send (sb) an email
▪ Can you send me an email with all the details?
send (sb) an invitation
▪ We sent out the invitations last week.
send sb to jail
▪ The judge sent Meyer to jail for six years.
send sb to prison
▪ I was afraid I might get sent to prison.
send sb to school
▪ His parents sent him to a private school.
send sb to sleep (=make someone start sleeping)
▪ She hoped the music would send her to sleep.
send sth by post
▪ They sent me the contract by post.
send sth in code
▪ The message was sent in code to the task force, as a signal to attack.
send your details (=send your name and address to someone in the post)
▪ For a free sample, send your details to us on a postcard.
send/give out a signal
▪ The use of the army sends out a clear signal to protesters that their actions will not be tolerated.
sending...on errands
▪ She was always sending me on errands.
send...into a tailspin
▪ Raising interest rates could send the economy into a tailspin.
send/offer your condolences (=formally express your sympathy when someone has died)
send/provide aid
▪ EU Ministers meeting in Belgium agreed to send humanitarian aid.
send/receive a copy of sth
▪ Could you send me a copy of the agreement?
sent a chill down...spine (=made her very frightened)
▪ There was something in his tone that sent a chill down Melissa’s spine.
sent a chill through
▪ The sound of his dark laugh sent a chill through her.
sent shock waves through
▪ The child’s murder sent shock waves through the neighborhood.
sent to the front
▪ He joined the army, and was immediately sent to the front.
sent...flying
▪ William hit Jack on the head and sent his glasses flying.
sent...spirits soaring
▪ Adam’s smile sent her spirits soaring.
sent...sprawling
▪ a blow which sent him sprawling
throw/send sb into a panic
▪ The innocent question threw her into a panic.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
away
▪ Often these children had no idea why they had been sent away.
▪ Carl Krebsbach wore it out when he sent away for $ 20 worth of car bombs.
▪ Mrs Gracie had been sent away.
▪ A: I was building my body, and I sent away for the Charles Atlas exercise manual.
▪ If his Mummy tried to come, she was sent away.
▪ He was the child chosen to be sent away to study.
▪ NO. 1 was sent away a little later.
▪ Suddenly, however, the ladies were sent away.
back
▪ It has been sent back with a frosty message from one of his constituents, who is unidentified.
▪ With no definitive ruling, however, he was quickly sent back to prison without his belongings.
▪ After de Silva was sent back, Alec Stewart threw to the bowler's end and Hick removed the bails.
▪ Thousands of survivors were released and sent back to their villages amid exhortations to the nation to forgive and forget.
▪ Valuable information was sent back regarding troop movements, flying-bomb factory and assembly areas, and supply dumps.
▪ All traffic was sent back to Fort Meade in Washington.
▪ A reply is sent back to the mall store saying the restocking pants are on their way.
home
▪ If any of the beaters did incur his wrath, they were sent home.
▪ Everyone was sent home with the assignment to draft a proposed definition.
▪ When he refused he was sent home, with lavish presents, to complete his task.
▪ If Sean forgot the sheet or if it was not signed, he was sent home.
▪ The official response to all this is that whenever men are caught in a brothel they are sent home.
▪ They may be more concerned about pain, or being sent home from the hospital after one day.
▪ Derek Turnbull arrived at Murrayfield, but was sent home suffering from flu.
▪ As a consequence, they were sent home.
off
▪ I see Chapman got sent off for Portsmouth.
▪ So they sent off records to hospitals at Stanford and UC-San Diego.
▪ Damiano Tommasi paid for it minutes later when he was sent off for felling Robbie Fowler.
▪ Here we go, I thought, as I sent off the entire request to the company.
▪ To rub salt into the wound, they had Michael Mols sent off.
▪ Amelia notified Mike Jackman to send off a telegram if they actually became airborne.
▪ So why delay? Send off now - 140 delicious new recipes are waiting for you.
▪ You thank them, make a few changes, and send off the document.
out
▪ The best IBMers were sent out in the seventies on secondments, then seen to come back into promotions.
▪ I mentioned that we had by agreement sent out in advance a large quantity of information posters.
▪ Others sent out letters offering wrongly suspected felons the chance of reinstating themselves.
▪ Invoices on account amounting to £24,000 had been sent out in 1989.
▪ Maybe if I had been sent to piano lessons instead of being sent out to play, I'd see things different.
▪ The jury will be sent out tomorrow.
▪ Did he really have all that in the kitchen or had she sent out for it?
please
▪ Green Shield will shortly cease their gifts so please send in what you have.
▪ Below is an application form for the Dinner Dance tickets. Please send me ... number of tickets at £12 each.
▪ Some one at Columbia please send her nut-brown eyes round to me in a jar.
▪ Those parents wishing to pay for the half-term should please send £46.90.
▪ He also suffers from heart disease. Please send appeals requesting his immediate and unconditional release to:.
▪ There must be some one out there who was at the match or saw highlights. Please send details.
▪ Will you help us to be there when they need us? Please send whatever you can.
▪ You are bone and wood, Grandmother, so you must know how to save us. Please send us food.
■ NOUN
child
▪ And buying a lovely house of your own and sending the children to good schools.
▪ Bay Area parents typically pay a few thousand dollars in annual tuition to send their children to preschool.
▪ Come on Mums - think before you send your child out alone.
▪ A newsletter is regularly produced including excerpts from the electronic messages received and sent by children using the network.
▪ The rich send their children to private schools and the middle classes move to the suburbs.
▪ As parents choose where to send their children some small schools are being by-passed for the larger urban schools.
▪ I had been sending my child the wrong message for years and here I was reinforcing that message.
copy
▪ On Nietzsche's return from the war in late 1870, Wagner sent him a copy of Beethoven.
▪ She sent a copy of her letter to me.
▪ I would be happy to send him a copy of our policy document if he would like to have more detail.
▪ It will generally be impracticable to send a copy of standard terms by telex.
▪ Mrs Kennerley sent a copy of the letter to his campaign team as proof of his patriotism at the time.
▪ The Buyer shall upon obtaining such signature send a copy of the signed undertaking to the Seller.
information
▪ Visitors with mobility, sight or hearing impairments will be sent an information sheet and plan on request.
▪ After reviewing the memo, Lake wrote a note to his secretary asking her to send the information to his broker.
▪ It's not a criminal offence, is it, sending information to the police?
▪ Michael and Susan Ramos will send you full information about their truly exceptional bakery products.
▪ Officials are sending out information packs to 4000 firms in the area, mostly employing office staff.
▪ He asked me to send him pricing information.
▪ Some offices send out information automatically while others wait for you to approach them.
▪ I had read a newspaper article on the National Teacher Corps and had sent away for information.
letter
▪ I had to send my letters via Du Camp.
▪ Faced with this situation, the church sent a letter to the apostle asking in part about his opinions on this problem.
▪ In time she was allowed to send letters to her former husband and to her children.
▪ Nicole Simpson sent him cookies, letters and tapes filled with love songs, he said.
▪ I must send a letter to her parents first thing tomorrow and then make arrangements for the funeral.
▪ I had moved up to Allocation and Repayment then, and I sent him a blistering letter about it.
▪ In the early days, individuals who sent letters received a standard reply from Paul Lee.
▪ Six thousand people a week sent letters and postcards.
love
▪ Of course, she sent her love to Jean.
▪ Users can send as many love missives as they like, one at a time.
▪ So listen to it, send it your love - then use a positive affirmation.
▪ A giant Styrofoam heart to send to your true love, from Better Than a Letter, $ 4. 50.
▪ Rachaela had not asked Ruth if she wished to send Emma her love.
▪ He asks me to send you his love.
▪ I am fine and your family is in good health and send their love.
▪ Grandparents, schoolfriends and neighbours all tried to write to the children, to send messages of love and support.
message
▪ Telegraph came to the village in 1901 and messages were sent by morse code.
▪ Anything that interferes with these receptors influences the messages being sent from neuron to neuron in the brain.
▪ About 50m messages are sent each day, turning mobile phones into a convenient medium for spreading rumours about the president.
▪ What a message we send when we pull our child back from the fence at the ballpark!
▪ Ralf riding post-haste through the trees with messages for Hoel to send to me.
▪ What kind of message does that send?
▪ Is this message sent on purpose?
▪ Imagine what a message that would send forth, both inside the city and out.
money
▪ The fund is now closed; please don't send any more money.
▪ There is only Fannie to send him money for books, clothes and entertainment.
▪ Please do not send any money at this stage.
▪ After the war Sammler had sent money, parcels, to Cieslakiewicz.
▪ She sent money to pay for my education.
▪ Everyone says you must send money orders if you do not want your letter stolen.
▪ For the first year he was at Berkeley, we continued to send him spending money.
post
▪ Her Confidential File etc. has been sent via registered post.
▪ Documentation is sent through the post when the software is downloaded.
▪ All tickets sent by return post.
▪ But it is illegal to import it, send it through the post or display it to the general public.
▪ Fax or telex messages should therefore refer to the standard terms, but the terms themselves be sent by post.
▪ Registration of mail is used when money or valuables are sent through the post.
prison
▪ If she really wanted she could get him sent to prison.
▪ Rodriguez said it was the first time a parolee has been sent directly from prison to a jail-like facility.
▪ However, this has been used mainly for those whose crimes would not have sent them to prison anyway.
▪ With no definitive ruling, however, he was quickly sent back to prison without his belongings.
▪ These two, when they arrived, he sent to the prison.
▪ Most of the Communists left with the Red Army, but some were sent to prison.
▪ This time they must send him to prison.
▪ Vincent was caught, tried, then sent to prison.
report
▪ Thomas asked Meagher to send him a written report.
▪ Perhaps the lab Tucson Water normally sends its samples to reports what Tucson Water wants to hear.
▪ We shall of course send a report of the questionnaire results to every institution which completes the questionnaire for us.
▪ Friez expects the disaster declaration will be made within days after the state sends the report to the president, he said.
▪ For instance, an employee is asked to send in a regular report on how certain work is progressing.
▪ Just keep sending the reports, he says, until further notice.
▪ But Rance sent no such report.
▪ Though regulatory authorities send folks reports on their pension savings every four months, few people actually read them.
school
▪ Men with potential were sent to torture school and underwent a process of desensitisation.
▪ In second grade my class was sent home from school for the afternoon when John F.. Kennedy got shot.
▪ They were sent to schools and teachers were expected to teach them.
▪ They sent him to sniper school, put a scope on his rifle, and that was the last of it.
▪ Then his uncle had decided that it was time to send him to school.
▪ Finally he was sent to an approved school and then he disappeared from the district.
▪ Do I send my children to school or out into the workforce?
signal
▪ This senses the water temperature and sends a signal to the control box where it is processed in a microchip.
▪ It sends no signals to the satellites.
▪ It has sent signals that the Tories never would.
▪ And the fifth layer sends signals to other deep and distant neural structures, sometimes even the spinal cord.
▪ Maybe Jaq would send the signal for exterminatus - and that command would already have been countermanded, light years away.
▪ A fiber optic system can send its signals greater distances and with less signal degradation than can the traditional coaxial system.
▪ With its ugly echoes of the past, it sends a worrying signal for the future.
wave
▪ She's sending out great waves of nastiness.
▪ The guide was lecturing telepathically, simply standing there, sending out thought waves to the crowd.
▪ The idea behind radar was to send out radio waves and listen for echoes from enemy craft.
▪ The grisly double homicide sent shock waves through this south Berkeley neighborhood.
▪ It closed possessively on the aroused peak, sending delicious waves of pleasure shuddering through her.
▪ The slaying sent waves of fear through the community, especially after three teen-agers were charged in the murder.
▪ Steamers sent waves up the banks and naked brown boys jumped into the wash, shouting and laughing.
▪ It sent shock waves through the education establishment.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(send sb on) a fool's errand
give/send your regrets
▪ Henry sends his regrets - he has the flu.
send sb off with a flea in their ear
send sb to Coventry
▪ I don't know why they won't talk to me. I didn't know I'd been sent to Coventry.
▪ Unfairly sent to Coventry for two weeks, Hannah decided to run away from school.
▪ When he refused to join the strike, Joe's mates sent him to Coventry for three weeks.
send sb to sleep
▪ However, the new research opens up the prospect of a far more effective treatment that simply sends the cancers to sleep.
▪ It was also brief because, as explained above, it simply sends me to sleep.
▪ The endless incomprehensible stream of language was sending Alan to sleep on his feet.
▪ To send them to sleep, she said.
send/deliver sth express
send/give your love (to sb),
▪ Dad and Charles send their love.
▪ I am fine and your family is in good health and send their love.
▪ Now I am alone except for this unwilling stranger and even to him I gave my love freely. 6.
▪ Of course, she sent her love to Jean.
▪ Open now your hearts to me; give your love to me.
▪ Please give my love to Christopher - will speak to you soon.
▪ Please send me a couple of views of St Albans. Give my love to Kitty.
▪ We are all fine and Chris and Nick send their love.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
Send a cheque for £50 with your order.
▪ He sent a dozen red roses to his girlfriend on her birthday.
▪ He sent the children out of the room so we could talk.
▪ He travelled all over the world, but decided to send his son to school in England.
▪ How many Christmas cards did you send?
▪ Kristen sent some pictures from the party.
▪ Perhaps I should send him a note of apology.
▪ She sent him a furious email.
▪ The ship sent a distress call.
▪ There are no plans to send British troops to the area.
▪ Who sent you?
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A fiber optic system can send its signals greater distances and with less signal degradation than can the traditional coaxial system.
▪ After his death, Dolly discovered he had sent two songs to a recording label.
▪ Each publisher had sent it back, in a packet addressed to Currer Bell.
▪ Having founded Fort Victoria in 1843, he was sent there as chief factor in 1849.
▪ Nero sends his luv, you know he's coming over here to give us a turn this winter.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Send

Send \Send\, n. (Naut.) The impulse of a wave by which a vessel is carried bodily. [Written also scend.]
--W. C. Russell. ``The send of the sea''.
--Longfellow.

Send

Send \Send\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Sent; p. pr. & vb. n. Sending.] [AS. sendan; akin to OS. sendian, D. zenden, G. senden, OHG. senten, Icel. senda, Sw. s["a]nda, Dan. sende, Goth. sandjan, and to Goth. sinp a time (properly, a going), gasinpa companion, OHG. sind journey, AS. s[=i]?, Icel. sinni a walk, journey, a time. W. hynt a way, journey, OIr. s?t. Cf. Sense.]

  1. To cause to go in any manner; to dispatch; to commission or direct to go; as, to send a messenger.

    I have not sent these prophets, yet they ran.
    --Jer. xxiii. 21.

    I proceeded forth and came from God; neither came I of myself, but he sent me.
    --John viii. 4

  2. Servants, sent on messages, stay out somewhat longer than the message requires.
    --Swift.

    2. To give motion to; to cause to be borne or carried; to procure the going, transmission, or delivery of; as, to send a message.

    He . . . sent letters by posts on horseback.
    --Esther viii. 10.

    O send out thy light an thy truth; let them lead me.
    --Ps. xliii.

  3. 3. To emit; to impel; to cast; to throw; to hurl; as, to send a ball, an arrow, or the like.

  4. To cause to be or to happen; to bestow; to inflict; to grant; -- sometimes followed by a dependent proposition. ``God send him well!''
    --Shak.

    The Lord shall send upon thee cursing, vexation, and rebuke.
    --Deut. xxviii. 20.

    And sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust.
    --Matt. v. 4

  5. God send your mission may bring back peace.
    --Sir W. Scott.

Send

Send \Send\, v. i.

  1. To dispatch an agent or messenger to convey a message, or to do an errand.

    See ye how this son of a murderer hath sent to take away my head?
    --2 Kings vi. 3

  2. 2. (Naut.) To pitch; as, the ship sends forward so violently as to endanger her masts.
    --Totten.

    To send for, to request or require by message to come or be brought.

WordNet

send

  1. v. cause to go somewhere; "The explosion sent the car flying in the air"; "She sent her children to camp"; "He directed all his energies into his dissertation" [syn: direct]

  2. to cause or order to be taken, directed, or transmitted to another place; "He had sent the dispatches downtown to the proper people and had slept" [syn: send out]

  3. cause to be directed or transmitted to another place; "send me your latest results"; "I'll mail you the paper when it's written" [syn: mail, post]

  4. transport commercially [syn: transport, ship]

  5. assign to a station [syn: station, post, base, place]

  6. transfer; "The spy sent the classified information off to Russia" [syn: get off, send off]

  7. cause to be admitted; of persons to an institution; "After the second episode, she had to be committed"; "he was committed to prison" [syn: commit, institutionalize, institutionalise, charge]

  8. broadcast over the airwaves, as in radio or television; "We cannot air this X-rated song" [syn: air, broadcast, beam, transmit]

  9. [also: sent]

Wiktionary

send

Etymology 1 vb. (context transitive English) To make something (such as an object or message) go from one place to another. Etymology 2

n. 1 (context telecommunications English) An operation in which data is transmitted. 2 (context nautical English) (alternative form of scend English)

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

send

Old English sendan "send, send forth; throw, impel," from Proto-Germanic *sandijan (cognates: Old Saxon sendian, Old Norse and Old Frisian senda, Middle Low German and Middle Dutch senden, Dutch zenden, German senden, Gothic sandjan), causative form of base *sinþan, denoting "go, journey" (source of Old English sið "way, journey," Old Norse sinn, Gothic sinþs "going, walk, time"), from PIE root *sent- "to head for, go" (cognates: Lithuanian siusti "send;" see sense (n.)).\n

\nAlso used in Old English of divine ordinance (as in godsend, from Old English sand "messenger, message," from Proto-Germanic *sandaz "that which is sent"). Slang sense of "to transport with emotion, delight" is recorded from 1932, in American English jazz slang.

Wikipedia

Send

Send or SEND may refer to:

Send (album)

Send is the tenth album by the English rock group Wire. It was their first recording as a 4 piece since 1990's Manscape and the first full-length release by any incarnation of the group since 1991.

Usage examples of "send".

We wondered for a long while why Kadra was so adamant about evacuating Tenua to the Abesse and sending her people straight into Volan hands.

Then the witch with her abhominable science, began to conjure and to make her Ceremonies, to turne the heart of the Baker to his wife, but all was in vaine, wherefore considering on the one side that she could not bring her purpose to passe, and on the other side the losse of her gaine, she ran hastily to the Baker, threatning to send an evill spirit to kill him, by meane of her conjurations.

He, therefore, who is known to have lapsed into heresy before his abjuration, if after his abjuration he receives heretics, visits them, gives or sends them presents or gifts, or shows favour to them, etc.

A cardinal had just been created in Australia, and an officer of the Noble Guard had to be sent with the Ablegate to carry the biglietto and the skull-cap.

A vial of that which is first passed in the morning, should be sent with the history of the case, as chronic rheumatism effects characteristic changes in this excretion, which clearly and unmistakably indicate the abnormal condition of the fluids of the body upon which the disease depends.

The signal gun aboard Endymion sent out a puff of smoke and a series of flags broke out at the mast-head.

All the Aboriginal girls were sent out as domestics once they reached fourteen.

He was arrested, charged with attempting to abscond and sent back to Wayland, where he remained until he had completed his sentence.

Martin Cash was a fellow countryman, born at Enniscorthy in County Wexford, and when he had been sent to Norfolk Island, he had talked freely of his exploits as absconder and bushranger, taking great pride in both.

The rogue showed up and spooked the convoy, sent Aby and Moon right off the mountain.

You may pass it on to Privalov, or to the Moscow Academician to whom you sent the knife.

After breakfast I sent for mine host and ordered an excellent supper for five persons, feeling certain that Don Sancio, whom I expected in the evening, would not refuse to honour me by accepting my invitation, and with that idea I made up my mind to go without my dinner.

That role gave him access to the transfer procedures, including how bank officials arranged for a transfer to be sent.

Sending sensitive information by fax Policy: Before Sending Sensitive information by fax to a machine that is located in an area accessible to other personnel, the sender shall transmit a cover page.

The willow has flourished by sending deep roots into the earth under the acequia, a small water ditch.