Find the word definition

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

sell

I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a selling point (=a quality or feature that makes people want to buy something)
▪ The house's main selling point is its beautiful garden.
buy/sell (a) property
▪ Buying a property is a complicated business.
hard sell
pyramid selling
sell a house
▪ We decided to sell the house and move back to Seattle.
sell insurance
▪ The company sells insurance alongside its electrical products.
sell sb into slavery (=sell someone as a slave)
sell shares
▪ This isn’t a good time to sell shares.
selling point
▪ Small classes are a selling point for private schools.
selling price
selling...wares
▪ craftspeople selling their wares
soft sell
sold at a premium
▪ Top quality cigars are being sold at a premium.
sold for scrap
▪ The equipment was sold for scrap.
sold on the open market
▪ The painting would fetch millions of dollars if it was sold on the open market.
sold out
▪ The group will play three sold-out shows at Wembley Stadium.
tough sell (=something that is difficult to persuade someone about)
▪ Gage predicted the president’s proposal would be a tough sell before Congress.
work/be sold for a pittance
▪ The crop was sold for a pittance.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
off
▪ The Government have spent hundreds of thousands of pounds on imaginative advertising for selling off the country's nationalised industries.
▪ He purchased Western Union through a bankruptcycourt reorganization, selling off its well-known money-transfer business.
▪ But the information technology division is to be sold off.
▪ These are companies whose total stock value is below what the company could get if it simply sold off its assets.
▪ Who should the Minister sell off the subsidiaries?
▪ Carolco filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in November and now is selling off its assets.
▪ This takes much of the uncertainty of house buying and selling off the relocated employee's shoulders.
▪ Selman has sold off two-thirds of his herd so far.
out
▪ The tactic plays to a public perception of Washington as a place that has sold out ordinary citizens.
▪ Still others sold out to larger companies.
▪ That was after I'd sold out and sent Julia to ... overseas.
▪ Advance tickets are $ 10 per person and $ 25 per couple, and sell out every year.
▪ Tickets for the concert, priced between £15 and £20, were sold out within days of being made available last Thursday.
▪ When he published a small booklet last year offering advice on choosing a last name, it sold out immediately.
▪ Minority voices on both sides will complain and accuse their governments of selling out.
■ NOUN
asset
▪ It is of course difficult to appraise peoples' motives for buying or selling derivative assets, so mere observation is insufficient.
▪ Carolco filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in November and now is selling off its assets.
▪ How many hungry people might have been fed when he sold his material assets?
▪ To grow, they slashed, re-engineered, and bought and sold assets.
business
▪ A friend of mines and me got us into business selling something.
▪ These old shops are still in business today, selling second-hand clothes and materials.
▪ Honesty, decency, good will have no place in this business of selling or murdering an image.
▪ The possibility that parts of the business could be sold off as a going concern should not be overlooked.
▪ This is dismaying to businesses who want to sell things.
▪ He wanted to build a big business selling running shoes.
car
▪ Mrs. Hamblin would have been precluded from denying the trader's authority to sell the car.
▪ Last year, Mazda took another step when it decided to sell Anfini channel cars through its Eunos dealerships.
▪ Voice over Anyone considering selling counterfeit goods at car boot sales could face two years in prison or unlimited fines.
▪ Infiniti sold 3, 494 cars in December, up 3. 5 % from a year earlier.
▪ But that law can't be used to stop people selling heaters at car boot sales.
▪ Only 21 black-owned dealerships sold foreign cars in the United States last year, VadenWilliams said.
▪ We decided that we would quietly sell the cars when possible and then wait.
▪ He made a successful transition from selling religion to selling cars.
company
▪ Members of Dorrance's extended family have indeed disagreed in public over whether or not the company should be sold.
▪ Fidelity often clears out entire investments in companies when it starts selling, he said.
▪ Cable companies stopped selling air time.
▪ The company will sell about 60 billion lire to the public by the end of January, say investment bankers.
▪ What happens if a company is sold to one private sector owner but is transferred to another within a year?
▪ The company sells its batteries mainly through electronics stores but is expanding to grocery shops and kiosks.
▪ Many companies will process and sell information, which is not confined by borders.
▪ Because what the company is selling is not its browser, but security.
copy
▪ By 1985, that volume had sold a hundred thousand copies in paper and another hundred thousand in hardback.
▪ In the mid-1970s it was selling around thirty thousand copies compared with the Times's sixty thousand.
▪ Then it ended up selling 500, 000 copies.
▪ By last week Atwood's novel had sold 1,069 copies.
▪ So far, Microsoft has sold about 12 million copies of Windows 95.
▪ The Daily Mail sold well over 200,000 copies daily in its first years and reached half-a-million sales after three years.
▪ Not until Walden sold two thousand copies, five years later, could Thoreau point to any audience at all.
goods
▪ Part of the licence will be an undertaking by the purchaser not to sell goods covered by an invention.
▪ This practice is particularly damaging to Third World countries trying to sell their goods.
▪ Experience in selling goods is certainly a plus.
▪ The profits of a manufacturing company are achieved by selling the goods it makes at a price in excess of its costs.
▪ They sell a variety of goods on a self-service basis.
▪ Industry has continually wanted devaluation to sell goods and because of this short-sighted attitude, what now do we make and sell?
▪ For the consent to be operative it must be such as to clothe the agent with with apparent authority to sell the goods.
▪ If the seller was only able to sell the goods elsewhere for £1,800, then the seller must refund £800.
home
▪ The couple, in their mid-70s, lost their life savings of £65,000 and had to sell their home.
▪ Homeowners who want to sell their homes without a real estate agent can now advertise their residential properties free on the Internet.
▪ He would come back and find the heavy mob were selling Tombstone as holiday homes.
▪ He is not, however, selling his old motor home.
▪ The actress says she must sell her home to pay.
▪ A similar trend is also developing whereby parents sell their home when their children have established an independent existence.
▪ Higgs and Hill sold 500 homes in 1988, but volumes dropped by 35 percent in the first half of 1989.
▪ Drops in income forced some Gypsies to sell their homes.
house
▪ Why not, dear, sell the house and come with Oreste to us?
▪ Still unsuccessful, they built and sold houses.
▪ They hope to sell the house as soon as possible but did not think it would go to a Vic Reeves fan.
▪ The idea came to her during rehabilitation, and to help fund it, she sold her house in Utah.
▪ If you're selling your house, try not to show people around on your own.
▪ Your father and I are selling the house as soon as you two leave for college.
▪ Whether they will be able to sell the houses at the end of it, is another matter.
▪ The owner selling the house knew.
land
▪ We can not sell the lives of men and animals: therefore we can not sell this land.
▪ Others were more conveniently sited for them but inconveniently for the Company, as a condition of selling land for the railway.
▪ Or maybe just sell the land for condos.
▪ The plan also says republics should continue their efforts to sell land to peasants.
▪ The freeholder may of course sell the land or property subject to the leaseholder's interest being maintained.
▪ If you have planning permission it's a hell of a lot easier to sell land.
▪ Using the techniques of forum theatre, the class try to persuade the old man to sell his house and land.
market
▪ Fisher also argues that, even if you know for sure that a bear market will occur, selling is dumb.
▪ They piled into the car and headed off to the local market to sell the shot glasses and recoup cash.
▪ The government always has the ability to step into the market to buy or sell its own bonds.
▪ It turned out to be the food market, where they sold swollen watermelons and aubergines and strange shaped fruits.
▪ Boys chewed and smoked opium in the small open-air market, sold cucumbers and onions, blue eggs and small tomatoes.
million
▪ The net assets of the businesses being sold total £0.2 million.
▪ It has sold more than 2 million copies.
▪ This year alone, he has produced three albums and five singles that have each sold more than a million copies.
▪ In November, the two North Carolina power companies sold $ 150 million in insured bonds.
▪ Traders speculated the company might sell more than 40 million shares in Cepa.
▪ New York State plans to sell $ 115 million in bonds this month and $ 140 million in commercial paper in March.
▪ I want to say to you, if you can sell one Kirby, you can sell a million!
percent
▪ Melinda says she can sell her services 40 percent cheaper than when she had a showroom.
▪ Euro Disney claims that one of its tour operators has sold 70 percent of its first three months of Euro Disney allocations.
▪ Mr Holmes a Court is thought to have taken advantage of the share's rapid progress, selling his 2 percent stake.
▪ Supermarkets may be as surprised as anyone to find themselves selling no more than 25 percent of national production by 1997.
price
▪ But it's not so brilliant for any shareholders who sold at the float price.
▪ The shares were sold at prices between $ 38. 45 and $ 40. 13 apiece.
▪ Here items in short supply are sold at inflated prices - but still generally lower than on the black market.
▪ If a smaller amount had been added, it would have sold at an intermediate price.
▪ Very expensive, it sells abroad for enormous prices.
▪ Sales agents acting on behalf of manufacturers, are vigilant in preventing retailers from selling at lower prices by threatening to cut future supplies.
product
▪ Since July the bureaucrats of the foreign-trade monopoly who knew how to sell its products abroad have been sacked.
▪ He had created an overhead that was impossible to make work and still sell the product at a competitive price.
▪ The decision whether or not to sell a product will depend on which ones make a positive contribution.
▪ Our distributors worked hard to sell our products.
▪ The selling and the product design were relaunched time and again.
▪ On the surface, it looks like just another chain of huge stores selling low-cost products that require purchaser assembly.
▪ As far as I know, no one has used an ad which is actively involved in selling a product in quite this way.
▪ When Stride Rite was earning $ 100 million pretax, it was doing it by selling product that has since been abandoned.
profit
▪ The recession has cut the number of Thames's commercial customers and has virtually killed off profits from selling redundant properties.
▪ Very few firms can turn a profit by selling just once and then scurrying out of town.
▪ Life insurers used to be able to show any profit from selling a bond in the year in which they traded it.
▪ I can get more profit selling drink downstairs.
▪ Until now they have made a tidy profit from selling re-issued pop hits from the fifties, sixties and seventies.
property
▪ In the meantime, an owner who wishes to move and sell his property has to wrestle with the problem of blight.
▪ Several years ago, he said he was arrested for cutting and selling timber on state property.
▪ To keep the budget deficit down, the government proposed to sell off shares and property valued at around 1,000 million kroner.
▪ Did you know that Fiske was involved with the company that sold Whitewater property for Doogle?
▪ They gave away small parcels, and even sanctioned the right to buy and sell property in the 1993 constitution.
▪ The church sold the property to Christopher and Marie Maier in 1986.
▪ The freeholder may of course sell the land or property subject to the leaseholder's interest being maintained.
▪ When the Maiers sold the property to the Pimentels, they signed a statement saying there were no significant easements.
service
▪ Households also sell their labour services to firms in return for the payment of income.
▪ E and Edison produce three-quarters of the power sold in their service territories.
▪ Site certificates are for companies wanting to sell goods and services over the World Wide Web.
▪ Over the years, they built a network of local dealerships and warehouses to sell equipment and provide service and repairs.
▪ You could sell your services to whichever temporary group of people needed to buy your skills at that point in time.
▪ Compliance Coach sells Web-based services to the banks, stockbrokers and myriad other companies subject to the law's requirements.
▪ The current thinking is to sell off freight services first.
▪ Raised in Chicago, Don sold construction services and transferred frequently.
shop
▪ Busy tourist shops sell quality leather goods, carpets and strikingly cheap cotton goods.
▪ Just sick over the prices in shops selling the 1960s furniture you finally convinced your parents to throw out?
▪ The book has now appeared in the shops and is selling well.
▪ The shops in Brookline that sell fresh kosher chickens are closed on Saturday.
▪ But a shop selling only summer-weight clothes in November looked mildly ridiculous.
▪ One spring Conran went on a tour of sixty shops which sold his furniture.
▪ A few motorcycle shops occasionally sell used ones.
soul
▪ A whole week in Paris at Easter seemed to her something for which she would willingly have sold her soul.
▪ She was accused of being a Salem witch for selling her soul to the devil at the strawberry banks.
▪ Bertinotti accuses Cossutta of selling his political soul.
▪ The fact that we would literally sell our soul to Continental Airlines.
▪ Faustus wilfully ends himself; he sells his soul to the devil.
▪ If he were mine, I would rather sell my soul.
▪ Timothy was agonising over her, when Honor West would have sold her soul for a single kiss from him.
▪ He doesn't accuse us of selling our souls.
ticket
▪ They also help Milan to sell tickets.
▪ It also opened a concierge desk selling tickets to area events and hired a tour coordinator fluent in five languages.
▪ The time-based Travelcard will continue to be sold, but some tickets will use stored value.
▪ We are selling more single tickets.
▪ Guildford Rally Teachers who sold tickets please send a list of names of those attending to Pat Shere.
▪ He did not need to sell tickets at the entrance of a marquee.
▪ It sells combination tickets to four museums for about £3.
▪ Stations of the Pennsylvania Railroad were used for picking up passengers and selling tickets.
unit
▪ He thinks that the company will be able to sell 12,000 units.
▪ Other citizens might also, if the bonds were sold in small units.
▪ Fujitsu looks to sell 35,000 units of the new models over the next two years.
▪ Kodak is exploring either selling its copier unit or setting a joint venture or strategic alliance.
▪ But how much does it cost to sell the units?
▪ Wall Street had been clamoring for Kodak to sell the unit.
▪ Currently priced at £149, they have sold about 50,000 units in the year since it was first launched.
▪ In more than one case entire housing subdivisions have been sold before the first unit was constructed.
■ VERB
agree
▪ Last month, Ladd agreed to sell its Brown Jordan&038;.
▪ Sainsbury and Tesco said they would agree to sell the unmarked products.
▪ A lower price enables them to buy shares for less than the price at which they have agreed to sell the shares.
▪ Being willing to talk after your board agrees to sell you is different to requesting a move.
▪ Hamilton agreed to sell him the story.
buy
▪ Both trying to buy and trying to sell a property can have fundamental implications for most people's financial situation.
▪ Firms that provide swaps buy or sell U. S. Treasuries to hedge against sudden interest rate shifts.
▪ Many pastoral and voluntary caring relationships are now bought and sold in the market place.
▪ Not all the associations are jumping at the chance to buy and sell derivatives.
▪ Each contract covers the right to buy or sell 1,000 Dixons shares at a given price in the future.
▪ Jovana is 16 and works under-the-table, buying bread wholesale and selling it back to small stores.
▪ Options give investors the right to decide, at some later point, whether they want to buy or sell something.
expect
▪ It expects to sell, in two or three years, intelligent robots capable of limited judgement.
▪ The new batteries are expected to sell for about the same price as current models.
▪ Omron sold 6,000 Lunas in 1992 and expects to sell 3,000 Luna 2001s over the next twelve months.
▪ Eventually, dealers say, the irritant is expected to be sold in retail stores and convenience markets as well.
▪ It is expected to sell its entire shareholding.
▪ It is expected to sell for about $ 75 per bottle when it is released this year.
▪ Swindon Town expect to sell their entire allocation of thirty-six thousand tickets for the First Division play-off final.
▪ He also is expected to sell his expensive Bentley automobile, leaving only him with a Chevrolet Suburban.
plan
▪ Members are also planning to sell badges of its bee logo to boost funds.
▪ It had planned to sell the bonds today, underwriters said, but decided to wait because yields have risen recently.
▪ It plans to sell its franchises in those countries but continue to operate in partnership with Pepsico in Britain.
▪ NatWest plans eventually to sell the building.
▪ The owner, tycoon Antony Tannouri, 46, had planned to sell the masterpieces after getting a £23 million tax demand.
▪ New York City plans to sell $ 750 million in bonds in February.
▪ The Sister Superior at Bartestree says the nuns were already planning to sell up.
try
▪ Also, you don't get a queue of aggressive-looking old men trying to sell you E all night.
▪ He had tried to sell the O &038; Ys and failed.
▪ Finally, if you are trying to sell your house, but without much success, aromatherapy may be the answer.
▪ If you buy into that idea, let me try to sell you on yet another one.
▪ You might try to sell dreams but in the end people don't buy them.
▪ It is, rather, defining the specific thing that you are trying to sell.
▪ Mr Cross also denied that Mr Bond was trying to sell the painting himself.
▪ For your own welfare, I must try to sell you!
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be selling/going like hot cakes
be sold a pup/buy a pup
high-pressure sales/selling methods etc
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Books that don't sell are sent back to the publishers.
▪ Do they sell brake fluid here?
▪ If you can, wait to sell until prices are high.
▪ It's not just a question of making a good product - we also have to go out and sell it to people.
▪ It is illegal to sell tobacco to anyone under the age of 18.
▪ Jackson faces a difficult struggle in selling his proposal to the city council.
▪ My parents sold the stereo at a garage sale.
▪ Postcards and souvenirs were being sold outside the cathedral.
▪ The antique buttons are very valuable, and we sell them for £100 and upwards.
▪ The company sold Braugh $100,000 worth of computers at discounted rates.
▪ The handcrafted rocking horses have sold well across the United States.
▪ The last model didn't sell as well as they'd expected.
▪ The painting was sold to an art gallery in Philadelphia.
▪ Their first album sold millions.
▪ There's no question about it - scandal sells newspapers.
▪ Tom's thinking of selling his motorcycle and buying a new one.
▪ We're hoping the house will sell quickly.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Everyone seemed to be selling chromium picolinate.
▪ If you want, say, a job in customer service, those skills would be important selling points.
▪ It sold shares in an initial public offering in May 1994.
▪ Most supermarkets sell a wide range of products - often with special offers and price reductions.
▪ Raised in Chicago, Don sold construction services and transferred frequently.
▪ Some land was raised, leveled and sold to farmers.
▪ They don't even sell white heather any more or tell your fortune.
▪ Vending machines Vending machines usually sell items such as hot or cold drinks chocolate and cigarettes.
II.noun
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
high-pressure sales/selling methods etc
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Sell

Sell \Sell\ (s[e^]l), n. Self. [Obs. or Scot.]
--B. Jonson.

Sell

Sell \Sell\ (s[e^]l), n. A sill. [Obs.]
--Chaucer.

Sell

Sell \Sell\ (s[e^]l), n. A cell; a house. [Obs.]
--Chaucer.

Sell

Sell \Sell\ (s[e^]l), n. [F. selle, L. sella, akin to sedere to sit. See Sit.]

  1. A saddle for a horse. [Obs.]

    He left his lofty steed with golden self.
    --Spenser.

  2. A throne or lofty seat. [Obs.]
    --Fairfax.

Sell

Sell \Sell\ (s[e^]l), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Sold (s[=o]ld); p. pr. & vb. n. Selling.] [OE. sellen, sillen, AS. sellan, syllan, to give, to deliver; akin to OS. sellian, OFries. sella, OHG. sellen, Icel. selja to hand over, to sell, Sw. s["a]lja to sell, Dan. s[ae]lge, Goth. saljan to offer a sacrifice; all from a noun akin to E. sale. Cf. Sale.]

  1. To transfer to another for an equivalent; to give up for a valuable consideration; to dispose of in return for something, especially for money. It is the correlative of buy.

    If thou wilt be perfect, go and sell that thou hast, and give to the poor.
    --Matt. xix. 21.

    I am changed; I'll go sell all my land.
    --Shak.

    Note: Sell is corellative to buy, as one party buys what the other sells. It is distinguished usually from exchange or barter, in which one commodity is given for another; whereas in selling the consideration is usually money, or its representative in current notes.

  2. To make a matter of bargain and sale of; to accept a price or reward for, as for a breach of duty, trust, or the like; to betray.

    You would have sold your king to slaughter.
    --Shak.

  3. To impose upon; to trick; to deceive; to make a fool of; to cheat. [Slang]
    --Dickens.

    To sell one's life dearly, to cause much loss to those who take one's life, as by killing a number of one's assailants.

    To sell (anything) out, to dispose of it wholly or entirely; as, he had sold out his corn, or his interest in a business.

Sell

Sell \Sell\ (s[e^]l), v. i.

  1. To practice selling commodities.

    I will buy with you, sell with you; . . . but I will not eat with you.
    --Shak.

  2. To be sold; as, corn sells at a good price.

    To sell out, to sell one's whole stock in trade or one's entire interest in a property or a business.

Sell

Sell \Sell\, n. An imposition; a cheat; a hoax. [Colloq.]

WordNet

sell

  1. n. the activity of persuading someone to buy; "it was a hard sell"

  2. [also: sold]

sell

  1. v. exchange or deliver for money or its equivalent; "He sold his house in January"; "She sells her body to survive and support her drug habit" [ant: buy]

  2. be sold at a certain price or in a certain way; "These books sell like hot cakes"

  3. do business; offer for sale as for one's livelihood; "She deals in gold"; "The brothers sell shoes" [syn: deal, trade]

  4. persuade somebody to accept something; "The French try to sell us their image as great lovers"

  5. give up for a price or reward; "She sold her principles for a successful career"

  6. deliver to an enemy by treachery; "Judas sold Jesus"; "The spy betrayed his country" [syn: betray]

  7. be approved of or gain acceptance; "The new idea sold well in certain circles"

  8. be responsible for the sale of; "All her publicity sold the products"

  9. [also: sold]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

sell

Old English sellan "to give, furnish, supply, lend; surrender, give up; deliver to; promise," from Proto-Germanic *saljan "offer up, deliver" (cognates: Old Norse selja "to hand over, deliver, sell;" Old Frisian sella, Old High German sellen "to give, hand over, sell;" Gothic saljan "to offer a sacrifice"), ultimately from PIE root *sel- (3) "to take, grasp."\n

\nMeaning "to give up for money" had emerged by c.1000, but in Chaucer selle still can mean "to give." Students of Old English learn early that the word that looks like sell usually means "give." An Old English word for "to sell" was bebycgan, from bycgan "to buy."\n

\nSlang meaning "to swindle" is from 1590s. The noun phrase hard sell is recorded from 1952. To sell one's soul is from c.1570. Sell-by date is from 1972. To sell like hot cakes is from 1839. Selling-point attested from 1959.\n

\nTo sell (someone) down the river figuratively is by 1927, probably from or with recollection of slavery days, on notion of sale from the Upper South to the cotton plantations of the Deep South (attested in this literal sense since 1851).

Wikipedia

SELL

SELL (Syndicat des éditeurs de logiciels de loisirs) is a French organisation that promotes the interests of video game developers. The group mainly distributes information about video game professionals to authorities and consumers. Created in 1995, the group is chaired by Philippe Sauze from Electronic Arts France. The general delegate is Jean Claude Larue (ex. Infogrames).

From June 1999 until the arrival in 2003 of PEGI, the organisation rated the content of video games in France. Their classification system had four categories: "tous publics" (all audiences), "12 ans et plus" (12 years and over), "16 ans et plus" (16 years and over), and "interdit aux moins de 18 ans" (restricted under 18 years).

Wiktionary

sell

Etymology 1 n. 1 An act of selling. 2 An easy task. 3 (context colloquial dated English) An imposition, a cheat; a hoax. vb. (context transitive intransitive English) To transfer goods or provide services in exchange for money. Etymology 2

alt. 1 (context obsolete English) A seat or stool. 2 (context archaic English) A saddle. n. 1 (context obsolete English) A seat or stool. 2 (context archaic English) A saddle.

Usage examples of "sell".

The accounting for the two sides of the transaction-buying production payments and selling fixed-price contracts-followed different rules.

Worse, traditional accounting provided benefits to companies that sold winning positions while holding on to losers.

They were going to use the accounting rules and sell the plants to an entity created by Enron itself.

I had told Aley to meet me in the store that sold the Disney paraphernalia.

The Minister of War, in a barrack-square allocution to the officers of the artillery regiment he had been inspecting, had declared the national honour sold to foreigners.

He alluded to the statement that the General Government was interested in these internal improvements being made, inasmuch as they increased the value of the lands that were unsold, and they enabled the government to sell the lands which could not be sold without them.

We got arrested shooting them off in a park and I had to sell off some shares of my old Mass Anal stock to pay the fine.

Your solution will be this: suspend the negotiations until your technician phones in, and then inquire of the Anarch as to whom he wishes to be sold.

So we Uditi still maintain that as an ownerless old-born the Anarch alone can legally sell himself, and we are now waiting for his decision.

He had been fired when the anatomist discovered him copying newly made diagrams to sell to other doctors.

The dairy company demurred to the regulation on the ground of its applying to milk produced and sold intrastate.

The contraband was invariably sold deep in the hinterlands, where dreams soured within weeks when it became clear just how tough it was to survive outside the enclosed comfort of an arcology, and nobody was going to question where sophisticated power hardware and medical packages came from.

In this case a North Carolina tax was assessed on the income of a New York corporation, which bought leather, manufactured it in North Carolina, and sold its products at wholesale and retail in New York.

But the syndicate members were bankers just like 518 KEN FOLLETT the Pilasters, and in their hearts they thought There but for the grace of God go L Besides, the cooperation of the partners was helpful in selling off the assets, and it was worth a small payment to retain their goodwill.

The frequent possession of Assientos by the Portuguese and Dutch in the first half of the seventeenth century also facilitated this contraband, for when carrying negroes from Africa to Hispaniola, Cuba and the towns on the Main, they profited by their opportunities to sell merchandise also, and generally without the least obstacle.