Find the word definition

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

seep

verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
away
▪ Here, the hours seep away like draining rain.
▪ We all imagine some invisible sub stance seeping away at death.
▪ There is a sense of all rational control or deliberation seeping away or being under much less deliberative control.
▪ They argue that unseemly haggling with Congress will allow the momentum of the referendum victory to seep away.
▪ It would take months, perhaps a year, for such strength to seep away.
▪ The lock had been built on quicksand, and gave continual trouble as the ground subsided and water seeped away.
▪ Then slowly the tension began to seep away.
▪ I had grown more and more tired, energy seeped away and I had begun to sweat at night.
down
▪ Water seeps down through the limestone, carrying along tiny deposits of the rock it's washing away.
▪ Hopefully, it seeps down to your bones and then you can portray somebody like this accurately and as realistically as possible.
▪ You can often see translucent curtain formations - where water has seeped down a sloping, overhanging wall.
▪ Heat entered the flat through the walls and windows, seeped down from the tar roof.
▪ The congealing blood from the severed arteries of the snow-soaked head drenching the carpet and seeping down between the floor boards.
▪ The rain seeps down through the snow and forms a bit of terra firma when the temperature plummets.
▪ His trousers were ripped and the blood seeped down his leg from the gash inches above his knee.
▪ We shivered; the rain was getting colder, seeping down our backs and numbing our hands and feet.
in
▪ When he closed them behind him, the noise of traffic seeped in.
▪ The muted reaction is a measure of how deeply the degradation has seeped in.
▪ It seemed to be seeping in from all sides, but how?
▪ Cold air seeped in through the shattered window with a moan.
▪ Metazoans are virtually absent except in some of the lakes where fresh water seeps in at the edges.
▪ A draft of cool air seeping in around my feet and calves.
▪ A faint, stale aroma like the residue of sweat - the city's stench seeping in.
▪ It also had a smoking room, which was furnished with one electric light and pressurised to prevent hydrogen seeping in.
out
▪ Sticky pools and channels of drink were seeping out through the gaps in the floorboards on to the sand beneath the kiosk.
▪ As I soaked in the hot pool, I felt the weeks of accumulated tear-gas residue seeping out of my pores.
▪ Slowly, though, word is seeping out.
▪ Dark was seeping out of the rock and it was difficult to see the steps ahead.
▪ It was as if his mind was a leaking vessel, his sanity seeping out like water.
▪ The smell of death seeped out of the zippered pouches and made the living retch.
▪ Prestige and power have seeped out of professions as women joined them.
▪ However, since nothing substantial has seeped out in this porous capital, that's doubtful.
through
▪ The techniques of the coffee table brigade were seeping through into academia, which was no bad thing.
▪ But hope seeped through and stained you anyway.
▪ Inside is a plastic platform which is perforated to allow liquids to seep through to the tank in the bottom.
▪ She didn't move away but allowed the small pressure to seep through to her very soul where it nestled comfortably.
▪ The door that Fenella had indicated was the one with ill-fitting seams that permitted the red glow to seep through.
▪ Then the water had gradually seeped through, so it was normal again.
▪ Jean-Claude's less assured tones seeped through.
▪ And what form would the Evil take, as it came seeping through?
■ NOUN
blood
▪ He felt blood seeping into his shoe.
▪ They tried to loosen them but failed. Blood began to seep from his hands.
▪ Then she stopped dead in her tracks, the blood seeping from her veins, leaving her stiff and white with shock.
▪ His skull had been kicked in and the dark blood seeped out, mingling with the grey sludge of his brains.
▪ Red on the bandage where blood has seeped through.
▪ His trousers were ripped and the blood seeped down his leg from the gash inches above his knee.
water
▪ Rain water had slowly seeped through the top section and dropped on to the inner.
▪ The lock had been built on quicksand, and gave continual trouble as the ground subsided and water seeped away.
▪ The water seeping around the abutment of the Saint Francis Dam was brown.
▪ How far into the water table have they seeped?
▪ It was a telltale sign that water was seeping through the canyon walls, softening the mica shale and conglomerate abutment.
▪ You can often see translucent curtain formations - where water has seeped down a sloping, overhanging wall.
▪ Then the water had gradually seeped through, so it was normal again.
■ VERB
begin
▪ Nagging unease began to seep into Delaney's weary bones.
▪ But as trickles of news began to seep through the court, detailing the king's every move, she welcomed them.
▪ The rain, still fresh on the grass, began to seep through the soles of his boots.
▪ Then slowly the tension began to seep away.
▪ Blood began to seep from his hands.
▪ The art begins to seep deep into his psychological being.
▪ The smoke began seeping through the now closed door so Ralph hurried towards the other exit.
▪ She was still shivering when he finished, but the warmth gradually began to seep inwards to where her bones were chilled.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Work has seemingly seeped into everything, including dinner parties.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Inside is a plastic platform which is perforated to allow liquids to seep through to the tank in the bottom.
▪ Many of these molecules seeped into the initially crystal-clear whisky from the oak casks in which the liquor was aged.
▪ She held her pyjama bottoms up with one hand, as wakefulness seeped slowly into her head like a sunrise.
▪ That the turmoil was seeping into the villages disturbed Gandhi especially and he resolved to go to Noakhall.
▪ The car was sluggish, as if his thoughts had seeped into the car through his hands.
▪ The techniques of the coffee table brigade were seeping through into academia, which was no bad thing.
▪ They argue that unseemly haggling with Congress will allow the momentum of the referendum victory to seep away.
▪ They melt and seep into other dreams, gaining strength, getting wider and deeper as they flow downhill, gathering debris.
Wikipedia

Seep (hydrology)

A seep is a moist or wet place where water, usually groundwater, reaches the earth's surface from an underground aquifer.

Seep (disambiguation)

Seep may refer to:

  • A groundwater seep
  • Seep (Card Game)
  • A petroleum seep
  • Cold seep
  • The Ford GPA, an amphibious version of the WWII Ford GPW Jeep.
  • The SEEP Network
  • South East Europe Pipeline (SEEP), a pipeline proposal by BP
Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

seep

1790, variant of sipe (c.1500), possibly from Old English sipian "to seep," from Proto-Germanic *sip- (cognates: Middle High German sifen, Dutch sijpelen "to ooze"), from PIE root *seib- "to pour out, drip, trickle" (see soap (n.)). Related: Seeped; seeping.

Wiktionary

seep

n. 1 a small spring, pool, or other place where liquid from the ground (e.g. water, petroleum or tar) has oozed to the surface 2 moisture that seeps out; a seepage 3 A seafloor vent vb. to ooze, or pass slowly through pores or other small openings

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Seep

Seep \Seep\, or Sipe \Sipe\, v. i. [AS. s[=i]pan to distill.] To run or soak through fine pores and interstices; to ooze.

Water seeps up through the sidewalks.
--G. W. Cable.

WordNet

seep

v. pass gradually or leak through or as if through small openings [syn: ooze]

Usage examples of "seep".

Heroin continued to seep down into the valley like the water that ran along the acequias from the high Sierra Nevadas.

What eyes-and-ears reported from Altara and Arad Doman was all confusion, and the few reports beginning to seep out of Tarabon again were frightening.

She knell heavily, feeling the cool dampness seep through her skirts to chill her knees, and scooped up a little earth in her hands, scrabbling at it, ending up with a handful of earthworms and wild violet roots for her pains.

He had the bottle and the glasses ready when the tall, fragile young man seeped in through the doorway of his day cabin, looking like a wisp of ectoplasm decked out in Survey Service uniform.

His cock was dark and engorged, the mushroomed head damp with the pre-come that had seeped over it.

Below the Feyn River estuary, timbers and sodden bodies bob in the heavy swells, and the whiteness of death seeps toward him.

He pierced both eyes of a beast that was part stoat, part gharial, but it continued to writhe silently toward him, flicking its leathery tail from side to side, yellow puslike emissions seeping from around the fletchings of the arrows embedded deep within its sockets.

The sifting, seeping flow of ash and lapilli had steadily risen higher and higher, lifting a chained dog with it.

It was not true concrete, however, and seeping rainwater had leached pockets from the material.

As hot air began seeping through the vents, Lotsa Smoke and Pretty Rose greedily put their hands over the grill.

He took a sip of tea, then lowered the mug to his chin, letting the steam seep around his face.

From a dark, mephitic hole in the bottom of the exact center of the depression, water began to seep forth, until the pond was once again filled to its brim.

Just like that, something tender he had never felt before took over his bones and seeped into his guts like a golden molasses, making him want to cry.

He hammered it home with the heel of his hand, muffling the draft to a small, cold seep, then bent to retrieve his fallen papers.

When I drove the blade through her, I released her spirit into the waters of this very stream, letting her soul free to seep into the current and travel northward beneath the mountains where she found her way to the Nocturn Spring.