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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

see

I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
alarmed to see/hear etc
▪ He was alarmed to discover that his car was gone.
amazed to see/find/discover sth
▪ Visitors are often amazed to discover how little the town has changed.
as far as the eye could see (=all the distance you could see)
▪ The plains stretched for as far as the eye could see.
astonished to see/find/hear/learn etc
▪ We were astonished to find the temple still in its original condition.
be gratified to see/hear/learn etc
▪ John was gratified to see the improvement in his mother’s health.
be seen/regarded as essential
▪ These measures are seen as essential for national security.
buzz saw
can tell/see the difference (=can recognize how two things are different)
▪ I can’t really see the difference between these two colours.
can’t wait to see the back of (=I will be happy when it ends)
▪ I can’t wait to see the back of this project, I can tell you .
circular saw
curious to know/see/hear etc
▪ Mandy was curious to know what happened.
cut/saw wood
▪ A local carpenter cut the wood to size.
demand to know/see/have etc sth
▪ I demand to know what’s going on.
disappointed to hear/see/find etc
▪ Visitors were disappointed to find the museum closed.
dismayed to see/discover/learn etc
▪ Ruth was dismayed to see how thin he had grown.
disturbed to find/see/discover/learn etc
▪ She was disturbed to learn he had bought a motorbike.
do/if you know/see what I mean?spoken (= used to check that someone understands you)
▪ I want to buy her something really special, if you know what I mean.
▪ We’re still married but living apart in the same house, if you see what I mean.
fascinated to see/hear/learn etc
▪ Ed was fascinated to see gorillas in the wild.
get/see sth in perspective (=judge the importance of something correctly by considering it in relation to other things)
▪ You’ve got to take a wider view and get things in perspective.
glad to see/hear etc
▪ I’m glad to see you looking so well.
go to (see) a play
▪ While we were in New York, we went to a play.
Holy See, the
horrified to see/hear/find etc
▪ She was horrified to discover that he loved Rose.
I see what you mean (=I understand what you are trying to say)
▪ Oh yeah! I see what you mean.
interested to hear/know/see etc
▪ I’d be very interested to hear your opinion.
it is disheartening to hear/see etc sth
▪ It’s disheartening to see what little progress has been made.
it is hard to believe/imagine/see/know etc
▪ It was hard to see what else we could have done.
▪ It’s hard to believe that anyone would say something like that.
it is interesting to see/know etc
▪ It will be interesting to see what happens when he gets a bit older.
it surprises sb to see/find/know etc
▪ It had surprised me to find how fussy he was about some things.
live to see (=live long enough to see)
▪ He did not live to see the realization of his dream.
loads to do/see/eat etc
▪ There’s loads to see in Paris.
look at/see the menu (=read the menu)
▪ He looked at the menu and decided to have the salad.
not a soul in sight/not a soul to be seen
▪ The night was dark and still, and there was not a soul in sight.
overjoyed to hear/find/see etc sth
▪ He was overjoyed to see his mother again.
pleased to hear/see/report etc
▪ I’m pleased to tell you that you’ve got the job.
read/see an article
▪ It was good to see such an intelligent article on censorship.
risk being seen/caught/arrested etc
▪ Workers who broke the strike risked being attacked when they left the factory.
saw the funny side (=recognized that it was partly funny)
▪ Luckily, when I explained the situation, he saw the funny side.
see a connection
▪ It's easy to see a connection between stress and illness.
see a counsellor (=go to a counsellor for help)
▪ Her doctor recommended that she should see a counsellor.
see a decline (=used to say that a decline happens at a particular time or in a particular place)
▪ The 20th century saw a steady decline in the rural population.
see a distinction (=recognize that one exists)
▪ He saw no distinction between religious beliefs and superstition.
see a doctor (also visit a doctor American English) (= go to the doctor)
▪ Have you seen a doctor about it yet?
see a film
▪ We saw a good film last night at the cinema.
see a patient
▪ I stayed in the treatment room while the doctor saw another patient.
see a play
▪ I’ve never seen the play.
see a programme
▪ Did you see that programme last night about crocodiles?
see action (=be involved in fighting)
▪ By the time he was 20 he’d seen action in the Gulf War and Bosnia.
see an exhibition
▪ We also saw an exhibition of paintings by Sydney Lough Thompson, a New Zealand artist.
see chapter 2/3 etc (=used in books to direct a reader to a chapter)
▪ His scientific claims were never justified (see chapter 16).
see for miles
▪ You can see for miles from here.
see in the new year (=celebrate the beginning of the year)
▪ Our neighbours invited us round to see in the new year .
see little/no merit in sth (=think that something is not a good idea)
▪ I can see no merit in violence.
see right through
▪ I could see right through the thin curtains.
see sb’s expression
▪ I would have liked to see his expression when she told him.
see sth in the context of sth (=consider and understand something in relation to a particular situation)
▪ His life and work must be seen in the context of his youth.
see the advantage (=understand the advantage)
▪ I can see the advantage of living near the station.
see the beginning of sth (=be the time when something important starts to happen)
▪ The 1970s saw the beginning of a technological revolution.
see the world (=travel to different parts of the world)
▪ He quit his job to see the world.
see/appreciate the humour (=understand that something is funny)
▪ I may have been wet and covered in mud, but I could still see the humour in the situation.
see/consult a lawyer (=talk to a lawyer for advice)
▪ She has consulted a lawyer and is considering whether to sue Bailey.
see/detect signs of sth
▪ I could see some signs of improvement in her health.
Seeing Eye dog
see/look into the future (=know what will happen in the future)
▪ I wish I could see into the future.
seen a ghost (=he looked very frightened)
▪ He looked as if he’d seen a ghost.
see/notice an improvement
▪ After taking the tablets, he noticed some improvement in his energy levels.
see/notice/observe a change
▪ I saw a big change in her when I met her again.
see/present sth in a positive light (=see or present something as good)
▪ If you spend a year travelling after school, employers often see this in a positive light.
▪ The merger was presented to the world in a positive light.
see/read sth in the newspaper
▪ I saw in the newspaper that he had died.
see/take/get sb’s point (=understand or agree with it)
▪ OK, I take your point. But it’s not that easy.
see/view sth from a perspective
▪ A child can only see see the world from his or her own perspective.
see/watch a game
▪ Did you see the game last night?
see/watch sth on television
▪ She saw the race on television.
So I see
▪ ‘Look – I’ve even cleaned the windows.’ ‘So I see.’
sorry to hear/see/learn
▪ I was sorry to hear about your accident.
think of a reason/see a reason
▪ I see no reason why it shouldn’t work.
▪ I can’t think of any reason why she would want to leave.
turn to/see page 22/45 etc
▪ Turn to page 8 for more details.
understand/see sb’s logic
▪ I could not understand the logic of her actions.
watch/see a movie
▪ We watched the movie and ate popcorn.
you can see sth in sb’s face (=you know what someone is feeling from the expression on their face)
▪ She could see the despair in his face.
you should have seen sb’s face (=used to say that someone was very angry, surprised etc)
▪ You should have seen his face when I told him that I was resigning.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
above
▪ As we saw above, there are limitations with the rational model as a method of solving problems.
▪ Cooperative application development with shared data should be possible via the open repository strategy that Informix has outlined - see above.
▪ The Software also has many limitations as seen above.
▪ For addition or substitution of a party, see above.
ever
▪ His maximum brought with it one of the fastest race times ever seen in Swindon.
▪ If you ever see Raytell him it was Owen that called Antheil.
▪ I'd almost given up hope that you'd ever see me as a girl ... a woman.
▪ Lewie used to say that I was the second worst clerk he ever saw.
▪ At first glance they realised that the specimen differed from any meteorites they had ever seen.
▪ Do you think the homeless and hungry will ever see a cent?
▪ This was, I think, the most attractively staged exhibition I have ever seen.
▪ Did you ever see one crash?
how
▪ Have you seen how much foundation he wears at Question Time?
▪ She would see how good he was at this.
▪ The idea is gradually to introduce one or two of these ideas and see how you get on.
▪ We can see how these things work, and we can begin to manipulate them according to our own designs.
▪ Hang about for another three hundred years and see how they celebrate my Tricentennial!
▪ Let us see how he did this.
▪ They do not expect him to lose but can not quite see how he is going to win.
▪ Finally, initiatives must harmonize with one another to help people see how change can happen across an entire organization.
never
▪ I've never seen anything like it.
▪ Wyatt had never seen an adult eat so much candy.
▪ Indeed, I never saw him eat.
▪ I have never seen so many injunctions all at once.
▪ Melanie had never seen anyone playing spoons before.
▪ Where was their home, she asked, the home which they would never see again?
▪ It is interesting to me that periods are never seen as important.
▪ He had never seen it before.
why
▪ It isn't difficult to see why the Panda is so popular.
▪ It is easy to see why such bread has no character.
▪ Jehan glanced at Jehana to see why she had not answered, and he saw that her face was crimson with embarrassment.
▪ Add feuding-paleontologists-in-love and you can see why Hollywood battled over this one.
▪ I turned round to see why.
▪ Can you see why a government might conclude that these choices have public significance?
▪ I don't see why I shouldn't look people in the eye.
▪ We can see why this phenomenon should occur.
■ NOUN
face
▪ How long had she seen the face for?
▪ Through the steam, Wyatt saw the pleasantly bearded face of a high school teacher he knew, Saul Bernstein.
▪ Riven hacked at the neck of one man who had a leg over the wall and saw the agonised face disappear.
▪ It was dark, and I could barely see his face.
▪ Normally, when you're walking along the corridor, and you meet me, you see my face, right?
▪ You can not pick up a local paper without seeing his face.
▪ I shook my head, saw his disappointed face as he walked away and immediately felt bad.
▪ Idly I ---, and as I lay dreaming I saw her face again.
light
▪ What had to be understood was the process which led to the evolution of society seen in this new light.
▪ We had not seen the screen light up.
▪ Jezrael could still see the lights of sunflowers strung out like mercury on rose satin.
▪ Then I seen in the light, like inside it, with the light all around, a person.
▪ Then I saw a second light beside the first.
▪ He say if you afraid of the truth to get back in the shadows cause you never will see the light.
▪ In the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s many macroeconomists have seen different lights on the road to an economic Damascus.
page
▪ For guidance on non-verbal behaviours see page 116.
▪ Further details of Holyrood Carpets, see page 4.
▪ Low-income entitlement For details, see page 22 of this leaflet.
▪ Connections to the soil pipe are more difficult as it will almost certainly be made of cast iron - see page 66.
▪ You are not likely to see feet photos on page three, which has become synonymous with mammaries.
▪ For full hotel details see pages 16/17.
▪ For full details and entry forms please see pages 52 and 53 of this issue.
▪ For further reports see page 10.
sign
▪ Mr Harty added he had seen signs saying fishing was for members only but had not taken any notice of them.
▪ Do you see a sign on me that says Jungle Clearing Specialist?
▪ As we stroll through the mall we can see signs of the opposite problem.
▪ For years, those closest to John E. du Pont had seen signs of delusional, erratic and occasionally violent behavior.
▪ But I saw no sign of it.
▪ Finally after what appeared to be a longer time than it was, she saw the exit sign reading Greenbriar.
▪ A couple of downstairs lights suggested that it was open, but of customers Karelius could see no sign.
▪ Through our windshields we see road signs and tail-lights-technology has blinkered us.
■ VERB
let
▪ Do it. Let me see!
▪ My sister made the mistake of letting the children see them and you can imagine they were very soon much depleted.
▪ They write the ingredients down separately without letting others see their papers.
▪ Who else? Let me see.
▪ Why not take it down to the firm's office and let the experts see it for themselves?
▪ Fine, let him come. Let him see that you are not the woman he remembers.
like
▪ We'd like to see them remain as houses.
▪ They like to see the history of science progressing intellectually by ideas.
▪ Jeffrey: I like the idea of seeing the gay movement as an attitude of mind.
▪ Finally Mrs Reagan said that she liked what she saw.
▪ He saw himself then, and now, and did not like what he saw.
▪ Residents fearful of their wells becoming contaminated would like to see the one of the wells moved farther south.
▪ She was brought up very nicely and she doesn't like to see bad in anyone.
▪ This is what she likes to see: good, hard playing, everyone working the floor, tough defense.
wait
▪ Clare waited to see if she would say anything else.
▪ As just an actress, you have to wait to see what comes to you.
▪ She thought she would wait, and see what happened.
▪ They are waiting to see if you fall into the trap.
▪ We have submitted our entry of 45,908 tokens and are waiting to see if we have been successful with this staggering total.
▪ While waiting to see if he will be an Athletic, or a Twin, or a Pirate, or a Marlin.
▪ We also had to wait and see what effect the anti-male injection had.
want
▪ You've always wanted to see me broken.
▪ Jack and Magee Spencer wanted to see a better return on the investment of their time and energy.
▪ When I wanted to see them before, I would take the shuttle up and down to Philadelphia.
▪ I do not want to see the World.
▪ This is not an entirely commercial enterprise, of course; it is also about people wanting to see one's work.
▪ When Macey wanted to see her husband, she practically had to make an appointment.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
I wouldn't be seen/caught dead
as/so far as I know/I can remember/I can tell/I can see etc
be glad/delighted/pleased etc to see the back of sb/sth
be nowhere to be seen/found
▪ Our tour guide was nowhere to be seen, so we set off to explore the city alone.
▪ She'd looked everywhere for her glasses, but they were nowhere to be found.
▪ Amelia Otis's name is nowhere to be found.
▪ But David Kent was nowhere to be seen.
▪ He had been searching for Morthen, to protect her from his violent half-brother, but she was nowhere to be found.
▪ I patrolled the town for a while, but they were nowhere to be seen.
▪ The prison director ordered a search, but the prisoner was nowhere to be found.
▪ When a game was on the line, Carr was nowhere to be found.
▪ Willie had looked around for the twins and George, but they were nowhere to be seen.
be to be seen/found/heard etc
▪ A comparable tendency is to be found in the theatre.
▪ A similar situation is to be found in other regions of the world.
▪ Further comments on attaching priorities to different subjects and to different levels of material are to be found in Chapter 3.
▪ He was to be found lurking in the band's dressing room whenever they ventured into Mancunian territory, which was often.
▪ It was to be found in the libraries of other leading Virginians: Lord Botetourt, Thos.
▪ She and two of the Aussies then proceeded to the next floor where guest bedrooms were to be found.
▪ The only reference to sustainable development was to be found in paragraph two hundred and thirteen.
▪ These words, in his own hand, are to be found, framed, inside the hall.
been there, seen that, done that
can see/spot/tell sth a mile off
▪ But I think he's lovely, and you can tell a mile off that he likes you.
▪ He's a hawkeye, and can spot one a mile off, like that faraway kestrel.
▪ Our sportsdesk can spot from a mile off a person who can not tell an in-swinger from a bouncer.
children should be seen and not heard
it does your heart good to see/hear sth
long time no see
▪ Uh, and says, uh, long time no see,.
not see hide nor hair of sb
▪ I haven't seen hide nor hair of him in months.
not see the wood for the trees
sb sees the glass as half-empty/half-full
see Naples and die
see stars
▪ I had bumped my head so hard that I began to see stars.
▪ Her head rocked, and for the first time in her life, she quite literally saw stars.
▪ In the third division, Hereford United were seeing stars at Gillingham after letting in 2 early goals.
▪ Normally, one is not able to see stars in the sky that are in almost the same direction as the sun.
▪ She did it anyway, deploying her chute so late that the jolt made her see stars.
▪ The darkness intensified down in the wood though I could see stars between the boughs.
see sth out of the corner of your eye
▪ Out of the corner of her eye, she saw a man running out of the store.
see sth through a mist of tears
see the colour of sb's money
see the error of your ways
▪ In fact Brian Moore reckoned it would take only twelve days for the administrators to see the error of their ways.
see the light
▪ Danny finally saw the light and bought me flowers on Valentine's Day.
▪ We can only hope the mayor will see the light and close down all these sex shops.
▪ But soon he could only see the lights of the boat in the distance.
▪ Each has attracted his or her share of supporters who could also see the light once it was pointed out to them.
▪ Five minutes later he saw the lights of a village pub.
▪ From two blocks away you can see the light radiating up into the sky.
▪ It was uncanny and Maggie was never so glad to see the light from her own room and get Ana back indoors.
▪ One must have experienced deeply, known greatness - seen the light, as he said.
▪ Sadly, for it was a lively, largely autobiographical piece, it would never see the light of day.
▪ You were sitting in your seat, pressed back by the acceleration, and you saw the light beams curve.
see the light (of day)
▪ But at least none of them saw the light of print - until today's souvenir edition.
▪ From two blocks away you can see the light radiating up into the sky.
▪ Get to the back of the drawers and cupboards - areas which don't often see the light of day.
▪ He say if you afraid of the truth to get back in the shadows cause you never will see the light.
▪ I can see the light under Marie's door, but there's no noise or nothing.
▪ I never sold a garment or got an order from this source, I wonder if they saw the light of day.
▪ I saw the light widening in the window, but I could not make myself get up.
▪ On a clear night, you could see the lights of Saigon.
see which way the wind is blowing
see your way clear (to doing sth)
▪ If you can see your way clear, call this number to volunteer.
▪ Finally he could see his way clear to his goal.
see/find out how the land lies
see/think fit (to do sth)
▪ The government has seen fit to start testing more nuclear weapons.
▪ Add details as you see fit.
▪ For example, the firm can implement its own quality and inspection policies and amend these as they see fit.
▪ He was their final court of appeal and punished them as he saw fit.
▪ If particular LEAs see fit to alter their priorities and redeploy funds from one area to another, that is their decision.
▪ Meg had - this gift; the Lord saw fit - no qualms, she stole the jacket.
▪ Once the states knew the message of the day, they could reinforce it as they saw fit.
▪ The public can use, abuse or change the software in any way they see fit.
▪ There were some girls that I thought fit Selena more physically.
show/see sb to the door
▪ My secretary will show you to the door.
▪ Amy helped him up and showed him to the door while Kath stripped off her gown and gloves.
▪ Hanmer said as he showed me to the door.
▪ His neighbours, who regard him as a hero, respectfully show you to the door.
▪ I saw him to the door and watched him pace away along the streets he knew better than most others in London.
▪ Mrs Teal merely wished that Annie show Lois to the door.
▪ Then she showed them to the door.
▪ They stood to leave and as an afterthought Cobalt got up, too, and saw them to the door.
the way I see it
▪ The way I see it, it was a fair trade.
▪ Best thing that could happen, the way I see it.
▪ Now the way I see it, you want more upmarket time than the plebs.
think/see straight
▪ He always saw straight to the point of an argument.
▪ Metaphorically speaking, you could see straight through him to the other side of the room.
▪ On the outermost point of the peninsula we could see straight over to Midland Isle and just beyond that to Skomer Island.
▪ Since that day she had not been able to sleep, or to think straight.
▪ Sooner or later he would be too exhausted to think straight and would give up the fight against himself.
▪ The buzz made it hard to think straight.
▪ Then she might - just might - be able to think straight.
▪ You are horrified, you can not think straight, as you stare at the broken body.
what should I see but sth/who should appear but sb etc
you should have seen/heard sth
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ 'How do you know it's true?' 'Because I saw it with my own eyes!'
▪ "I've come to see Mr. Greene about a job," he said nervously.
▪ "Is he ready yet?" "I don't know - I'll go and see."
▪ "It goes in the red box, here." "Oh, I see."
▪ Ally has been seeing an analyst for years.
▪ At fourteen, he couldn't see the point of staying in school.
▪ Can't you see I'm eating?
▪ Can you see any reason why it shouldn't work?
▪ Can you see who's at the door?
▪ Dad doesn't see as well as he used to.
▪ Danielle's still too sick to see anyone today.
▪ Did you see a white van parked out here earlier today?
▪ Did you see the news last night?
▪ Dr Thomas is seeing a client at 2:30.
▪ Dr. McNeil had never seen an injury like this before.
▪ Have you seen my pen anywhere?
▪ Have you seen what Jake's done to his bedroom?
▪ He's just one of those people who never seem to see the joke.
▪ He saw a man get out of the car and walk to the side of the road.
▪ Hi, I'm here to see Mary Jorgensen.
II.noun
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
I fail to see/understand
▪ I fail to see the humor in this situation.
▪ How presumptuous my claims to knowledge based only on what I see, leaving out what I fail to see.
▪ However I fail to see firstly what you are trying to prove with your figures.
▪ Last year? I failed to see the connection.
I wouldn't be seen/caught dead
I'd like to see you/him do sth
▪ But I 'd like to see you again, when we can make time.
▪ I 'd like to see him again.
▪ I 'd like to see you give our boys a run for their money.
as/so far as I know/I can remember/I can tell/I can see etc
be glad/delighted/pleased etc to see the back of sb/sth
be nowhere to be seen/found
▪ Our tour guide was nowhere to be seen, so we set off to explore the city alone.
▪ She'd looked everywhere for her glasses, but they were nowhere to be found.
▪ Amelia Otis's name is nowhere to be found.
▪ But David Kent was nowhere to be seen.
▪ He had been searching for Morthen, to protect her from his violent half-brother, but she was nowhere to be found.
▪ I patrolled the town for a while, but they were nowhere to be seen.
▪ The prison director ordered a search, but the prisoner was nowhere to be found.
▪ When a game was on the line, Carr was nowhere to be found.
▪ Willie had looked around for the twins and George, but they were nowhere to be seen.
be to be seen/found/heard etc
▪ A comparable tendency is to be found in the theatre.
▪ A similar situation is to be found in other regions of the world.
▪ Further comments on attaching priorities to different subjects and to different levels of material are to be found in Chapter 3.
▪ He was to be found lurking in the band's dressing room whenever they ventured into Mancunian territory, which was often.
▪ It was to be found in the libraries of other leading Virginians: Lord Botetourt, Thos.
▪ She and two of the Aussies then proceeded to the next floor where guest bedrooms were to be found.
▪ The only reference to sustainable development was to be found in paragraph two hundred and thirteen.
▪ These words, in his own hand, are to be found, framed, inside the hall.
been there, seen that, done that
can see/spot/tell sth a mile off
▪ But I think he's lovely, and you can tell a mile off that he likes you.
▪ He's a hawkeye, and can spot one a mile off, like that faraway kestrel.
▪ Our sportsdesk can spot from a mile off a person who can not tell an in-swinger from a bouncer.
it does your heart good to see/hear sth
it remains to be seen
▪ "What is your next film going to be about?'' "Well, that remains to be seen.''
▪ It remains to be seen how many senior citizens will actually benefit from this new plan.
▪ What remains to be seen now is whether it is too late to save the rainforests.
▪ Whether the team can sustain its winning streak remains to be seen.
▪ And it remains to be seen if re- signing Greg Vaughn will be a hit or a miss.
▪ But it remains to be seen whether that will prove a significant omission.
▪ But it remains to be seen whether this will exacerbate chronic unemployment or solve it.
▪ Steel will make it remains to be seen.
▪ The meaning of prevention in the new Children Act is multifaceted and it remains to be seen how it will be operationalized.
▪ Today it remains to be seen whether Museveni's essentially centralist approach will be more successful than its predecessors.
▪ Whether I reach it remains to be seen!
▪ Yet it remains to be seen how strong are the forces of Euro-scepticism in Labour's own ranks.
let's see
▪ Okay, let's see, what were we talking about?
live to see/fight another day
▪ A conciliatory gesture, some argued, would appease the cardinal and Holy Trinity would live to fight another day.
▪ By his diplomacy, it was true, Gordon had lived to fight another day.
▪ Having lived to fight another day, Mayer did - with Sam Goldwyn.
▪ Or will they live to fight another day?
▪ Pol pot lives to fight another day despite butchering millions of his people.
▪ The choice for us was whether to take a strike unprepared or to live to fight another day.
long time no see
▪ Uh, and says, uh, long time no see,.
not see hide nor hair of sb
▪ I haven't seen hide nor hair of him in months.
see Naples and die
see if I care!
see stars
▪ I had bumped my head so hard that I began to see stars.
▪ Her head rocked, and for the first time in her life, she quite literally saw stars.
▪ In the third division, Hereford United were seeing stars at Gillingham after letting in 2 early goals.
▪ Normally, one is not able to see stars in the sky that are in almost the same direction as the sun.
▪ She did it anyway, deploying her chute so late that the jolt made her see stars.
▪ The darkness intensified down in the wood though I could see stars between the boughs.
see sth out of the corner of your eye
▪ Out of the corner of her eye, she saw a man running out of the store.
see sth through a mist of tears
see the colour of sb's money
see the error of your ways
▪ In fact Brian Moore reckoned it would take only twelve days for the administrators to see the error of their ways.
see what I mean?
▪ See what I mean, Dad, about this camera being difficult to use?
▪ And little enough for cleverness, if you see what I mean.
▪ BBut you see what I mean.
▪ Do you see what I mean, he was trying?
▪ He had this manner, as if he was a bit above the rest of us, if you see what I mean.
▪ He just has the feelings, if you see what I mean.
▪ I think you will see what I mean only after tasting this bread.
▪ You see what I mean about having to keep up with things.
▪ You see what I mean when I say it's nothing new, it's been endlessly talked around.
see which way the wind is blowing
see your way clear (to doing sth)
▪ If you can see your way clear, call this number to volunteer.
▪ Finally he could see his way clear to his goal.
see/find out how the land lies
see/find out what sb is (really) made of
see/think fit (to do sth)
▪ The government has seen fit to start testing more nuclear weapons.
▪ Add details as you see fit.
▪ For example, the firm can implement its own quality and inspection policies and amend these as they see fit.
▪ He was their final court of appeal and punished them as he saw fit.
▪ If particular LEAs see fit to alter their priorities and redeploy funds from one area to another, that is their decision.
▪ Meg had - this gift; the Lord saw fit - no qualms, she stole the jacket.
▪ Once the states knew the message of the day, they could reinforce it as they saw fit.
▪ The public can use, abuse or change the software in any way they see fit.
▪ There were some girls that I thought fit Selena more physically.
seeing is believing
▪ But seeing is believing, as they say.
▪ If you're still not convinced, seeing is believing.
▪ We are left with the unspecific practical objection, the objection that is as much to say that only seeing is believing.
▪ When only seeing is believing the unseen reproductive anatomy of the female can not be an article of faith.
suck it and see
the way I see it
▪ The way I see it, it was a fair trade.
▪ Best thing that could happen, the way I see it.
▪ Now the way I see it, you want more upmarket time than the plebs.
think/see straight
▪ He always saw straight to the point of an argument.
▪ Metaphorically speaking, you could see straight through him to the other side of the room.
▪ On the outermost point of the peninsula we could see straight over to Midland Isle and just beyond that to Skomer Island.
▪ Since that day she had not been able to sleep, or to think straight.
▪ Sooner or later he would be too exhausted to think straight and would give up the fight against himself.
▪ The buzz made it hard to think straight.
▪ Then she might - just might - be able to think straight.
▪ You are horrified, you can not think straight, as you stare at the broken body.
wait and see
▪ He decided to wait and see what happened in the other rehearsals.
▪ I promise you, you just wait and see.
▪ I would simply have to wait and see.
▪ Staff at Oxford Regional health Authority will now have to wait and see how many of them are to keep their jobs.
▪ The best attitude to have towards money matters in 1993 is: wait and see.
▪ They therefore had decided to wait and see how the operations progressed before attempting to formulate subsequent war strategy.
▪ Until recently, all she and her family could do was wait and see.
▪ You said you were going to wait and see.
what should I see but sth/who should appear but sb etc
you should have seen/heard sth
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But the see of London is work for the physically strong, not for declining energy.
▪ He could manage the see of London.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

See

See \See\ (s[=e]), v. t. [imp. Saw (s[add]); p. p. Seen (s[=e]n); p. pr. & vb. n. Seeing.] [OE. seen, sen, seon, AS. se['o]n; akin to OFries. s[=i]a, D. zien, OS. & OHG. sehan, G. sehen, Icel. sj[=a], Sw. se, Dan. see, Goth. sa['i]hwan, and probably to L. sequi to follow (and so originally meaning, to follow with the eyes). Gr. "e`pesqai, Skr. sac. Cf. Sight, Sue to follow.]

  1. To perceive by the eye; to have knowledge of the existence and apparent qualities of by the organs of sight; to behold; to descry; to view.

    I will now turn aside, and see this great sight.
    --Ex. iii. 3.

  2. To perceive by mental vision; to form an idea or conception of; to note with the mind; to observe; to discern; to distinguish; to understand; to comprehend; to ascertain.

    Go, I pray thee, see whether it be well with thy brethren.
    --Gen. xxxvii. 14.

    Jesus saw that he answered discreetly.
    --Mark xii. 34.

    Who's so gross That seeth not this palpable device?
    --Shak.

  3. To follow with the eyes, or as with the eyes; to watch; to regard attentively; to look after.
    --Shak.

    I had a mind to see him out, and therefore did not care for contradicting him.
    --Addison.

  4. To have an interview with; especially, to make a call upon; to visit; as, to go to see a friend.

    And Samuel came no more to see Saul until the day of his death.
    --1 Sam. xv. 3

  5. 5. To fall in with; to meet or associate with; to have intercourse or communication with; hence, to have knowledge or experience of; as, to see military service.

    Make us glad according to the days wherein thou hast afflicted us, and the years wherein we have seen evil.
    --Ps. xc. 15.

    Verily, verily, I say unto you, if a man keep my saying, he shall never see death.
    --John viii. 51.

    Improvement in wisdom and prudence by seeing men.
    --Locke.

  6. To accompany in person; to escort; to wait upon; as, to see one home; to see one aboard the cars.

  7. In poker and similar games at cards, to meet (a bet), or to equal the bet of (a player), by staking the same sum. ``I'll see you and raise you ten.''

    God you see (or God him see or God me see, etc.), God keep you (him, me, etc.) in his sight; God protect you. [Obs.]
    --Chaucer.

    To see (anything) out, to see (it) to the end; to be present at, work at, or attend, to the end.

    To see stars, to see flashes of light, like stars; -- sometimes the result of concussion of the head. [Colloq.]

    To see (one) through, to help, watch, or guard (one) to the end of a course or an undertaking.

See

See \See\, n. [OE. se, see, OF. se, sed, sied, fr. L. sedes a seat, or the kindred sedere to sit. See Sit, and cf. Siege.]

  1. A seat; a site; a place where sovereign power is exercised. [Obs.]
    --Chaucer.

    Jove laughed on Venus from his sovereign see.
    --Spenser.

  2. Specifically:

    1. The seat of episcopal power; a diocese; the jurisdiction of a bishop; as, the see of New York.

    2. The seat of an archbishop; a province or jurisdiction of an archbishop; as, an archiepiscopal see.

    3. The seat, place, or office of the pope, or Roman pontiff; as, the papal see.

    4. The pope or his court at Rome; as, to appeal to the see of Rome.

      Apostolic see. See under Apostolic.

See

See \See\, v. i.

  1. To have the power of sight, or of perceiving by the proper organs; to possess or employ the sense of vision; as, he sees distinctly.

    Whereas I was blind, now I see.
    --John ix. 25.

  2. Figuratively: To have intellectual apprehension; to perceive; to know; to understand; to discern; -- often followed by a preposition, as through, or into.

    For judgment I am come into this world, that they which see not might see; and that they which see might be made blind.
    --John ix. 39.

    Many sagacious persons will find us out, . . . and see through all our fine pretensions.
    --Tillotson.

  3. To be attentive; to take care; to give heed; -- generally with to; as, to see to the house.

    See that ye fall not out by the way.
    --Gen. xlv. 2

  4. Note: Let me see, Let us see, are used to express consideration, or to introduce the particular consideration of a subject, or some scheme or calculation. Cassio's a proper man, let me see now, To get his place. --Shak. Note: See is sometimes used in the imperative for look, or behold. ``See. see! upon the banks of Boyne he stands.'' --Halifax. To see about a thing, to pay attention to it; to consider it. To see on, to look at. [Obs.] ``She was full more blissful on to see.'' --Chaucer. To see to.

    1. To look at; to behold; to view. [Obs.] ``An altar by Jordan, a great altar to see to''
      --Josh. xxii. 10.

    2. To take care about; to look after; as, to see to a fire.

WordNet

see

  1. n. the seat within a bishop's diocese where his cathedral is located

  2. [also: seen, saw]

see

  1. adv. compare (used in texts to point the reader to another location in the text) [syn: cf., cf, confer, see also]

  2. [also: seen, saw]

see

  1. v. perceive by sight or have the power to perceive by sight; "You have to be a good observer to see all the details"; "Can you see the bird in that tree?"; "He is blind--he cannot see"

  2. perceive (an idea or situation) mentally; "Now I see!"; "I just can't see your point"; "Does she realize how important this decision is?"; "I don't understand the idea" [syn: understand, realize, realise]

  3. perceive or be contemporaneous with; "We found Republicans winning the offices"; "You'll see a lot of cheating in this school"; "I want to see results"; "The 1960 saw the rebellion of the younger generation against established traditions"; "I want to see results" [syn: witness, find]

  4. imagine; conceive of; see in one's mind; "I can't see him on horseback!"; "I can see what will happen"; "I can see a risk in this strategy" [syn: visualize, visualise, envision, project, fancy, figure, picture, image]

  5. deem to be; "She views this quite differently from me"; "I consider her to be shallow"; "I don't see the situation quite as negatively as you do" [syn: consider, reckon, view, regard]

  6. get to know or become aware of, usually accidentally; "I learned that she has two grown-up children"; "I see that you have been promoted" [syn: learn, hear, get word, get wind, pick up, find out, get a line, discover]

  7. see or watch; "view a show on television"; "This program will be seen all over the world"; "view an exhibition"; "Catch a show on Broadway"; "see a movie" [syn: watch, view, catch, take in]

  8. find out, learn, or determine with certainty, usually by making an inquiry or other effort; "I want to see whether she speaks French"; "See whether it works"; "find out if he speaks Russian"; "Check whether the train leaves on time" [syn: determine, check, find out, ascertain, watch, learn]

  9. come together; "I'll probably see you at the meeting"; "How nice to see you again!" [syn: meet, ran into, encounter, run across, come across]

  10. be careful or certain to do something; make certain of something; "He verified that the valves were closed"; "See that the curtains are closed"; "control the quality of the product" [syn: check, insure, see to it, ensure, control, ascertain, assure]

  11. go to see for professional or business reasons; "You should see a lawyer"; "We had to see a psychiatrist"

  12. go to see for a social visit; "I went to see my friend Mary the other day"

  13. visit a place, as for entertainment; "We went to see the Eiffel Tower in the morning" [syn: visit]

  14. take charge of or deal with; "Could you see about lunch?"; "I must attend to this matter"; "She took care of this business" [syn: attend, take care, look]

  15. receive as a specified guest; "the doctor will see you now"; "The minister doesn't see anybody before noon"

  16. date regularly; have a steady relationship with; "Did you know that she is seeing an older man?"; "He is dating his former wife again!" [syn: go steady, go out, date]

  17. see and understand, have a good eye; "The artist must first learn to see"

  18. deliberate or decide; "See whether you can come tomorrow"; "let's see--which movie should we see tonight?"

  19. observe as if with an eye; "The camera saw the burglary and recorded it"

  20. observe, check out, and look over carefully or inspect; "The customs agent examined the baggage"; "I must see your passport before you can enter the country" [syn: examine]

  21. go or live through; "We had many trials to go through"; "he saw action in Viet Nam" [syn: experience, undergo, go through]

  22. accompany or escort; "I'll see you to the door" [syn: escort]

  23. match or meet; "I saw the bet of one of my fellow players"

  24. make sense of; assign a meaning to; "What message do you see in this letter?"; "How do you interpret his behavior?" [syn: interpret, construe]

  25. [also: seen, saw]

Wikipedia

See

See or SEE may refer to:

  • The act of visual perception
  • The term "See:" as a form of citation signal
  • Episcopal see, domain of authority of a bishop
  • Holy See, the central government of the Roman Catholic Church
  • See Magazine, an alternative weekly newspaper in Edmonton, Canada from 1992 to 2011
  • See Tickets, a British ticketing services company
  • Small Emplacement Excavator, a military vehicle

Sée

The Sée is an 78 km long river in the Manche department, Normandy, France, beginning near Sourdeval. It empties into the bay of Mont Saint-Michel (part of the English Channel) in Avranches, close to the mouth of the Sélune river. Another town along the Sée is Brécey.

See (album)

See is the sixth studio album by rock band The Rascals, released in December 1969. It peaked at number 45 on the Billboard 200. Three singles were released from the album although the third "I Believe" b/w "Hold On" was released on Search and Nearness.

See (Preacher)

"See" is the second episode of the supernatural drama television series, Preacher, which originally aired on AMC in the United States on June 5, 2016. The episode was written by series showrunner Sam Catlin, and directed by Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg.

The episode "See" introduces Graham McTavish and Jackie Earle Haley as the Cowboy and Odin Quincannon, respectively. Jesse ( Dominic Cooper) begins struggling with God's silence. Cassidy ( Joseph Gilgun) opens up to Jesse about his true identity. Government agents Fiore ( Tom Brooke) and DeBlanc ( Anatol Yusef) sneak into the church for Jesse but Cassidy arrives in time to slaughter the duo. Tulip ( Ruth Negga) once again attempts her campaign to recruit Jesse to the dark side. Later, Jesse discovers his new abilities, using them to silence barking dogs and to remove the memory of "the Girl" from the mind of a dangerous pedophile. The episode ends with Jesse using his power to try to revive a girl in a coma.

"See" received praise from critics who noted the outstanding visuals, wonderfully demented set pieces, the fight between Cassidy, Fiore and DeBlanc, and great character moments that provides the series with a thematic throughline beneath the blood and carnage. The episode garnered a Nielsen rating of 0.8 in the 18–49 demographic, translating to 2.08 million viewers.

Wiktionary

see

Etymology 1 vb. To perceive or detect with the eyes, or as if by sight. Etymology 2

n. 1 A diocese, archdiocese; a region of a church, generally headed by a bishop, ''especially'' an archbishop. 2 The office of a bishop or archbishop; bishopric or archbishopric 3 A seat; a site; a place where sovereign power is exercised.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

see

c.1300, "throne of a bishop, archbishop, or pope," also "throne of a monarch, a goddess, Antichrist, etc.," from Old French sie "seat, throne; town, capital; episcopal see," from Latin sedem (nominative sedes) "seat, throne, abode, temple," related to sedere "to sit" (see sedentary). Early 14c. as "administrative center of a bishopric;" c.1400 as "province under the jurisdiction of a bishop."

see

Old English seon "to see, look, behold; observe, perceive, understand; experience, visit, inspect" (contracted class V strong verb; past tense seah, past participle sewen), from Proto-Germanic *sekhwan (cognates: Old Saxon, Old High German sehan, Middle High German, German sehen, Old Frisian sia, Middle Dutch sien, Old Norse sja, Gothic saihwan), from PIE root *sekw- (2) "to see," which is probably identical with *sekw- (1) "to follow" (see sequel), a root which produced words for "say" in Greek and Latin, and also words for "follow" (such as Latin sequor), but "opinions differ in regard to the semantic starting-point and sequences" [Buck]. Thus see might originally mean "follow with the eyes."\n

\nUsed in Middle English to mean "behold in the imagination or in a dream" (c.1200), "to recognize the force of (a demonstration)," also c.1200. Sense of "escort" (as in to see (someone) home) first recorded 1607 in Shakespeare. Meaning "to receive as a visitor" is attested from c.1500. Gambling sense of "equal a bet" is from 1590s. See you as a casual farewell first attested 1891. Let me see as a pausing statement is recorded from 1510s. To have seen everything as a hyperbolic expression of astonishment is from 1957.\nWhen you have seen one of their Pictures, you have seen all. [Blake, c.1811]

Usage examples of "see".

I saw that Aberrancy was not a fouling of the body, but merely a changing.

He saw that the epicentre of Aberrancy always lay at the site of a Weaver monastery, and the monasteries were always built around the witchstones.

I that the high families would sooner see an Aberrant on the throne than a Weaver.

Empress is wooing the nobles as well as she can, by introducing them to the Aberrant child so that they may see she is not deformed or freakish.

That quest was abetted by a sympathetic schoolteacher, Rebecca, who saw in the lad a glimmering hope that occasionally there might be resurrection from a bitter life sentence in the emotionally barren and aesthetically vitiated Kentucky hamlet, and who ultimately seduced him.

Now he thought that he would abide their coming and see if he might join their company, since if he crossed the water he would be on the backward way: and it was but a little while ere the head of them came up over the hill, and were presently going past Ralph, who rose up to look on them, and be seen of them, but they took little heed of him.

Moreover, thou sayest it that the champions of the Dry Tree, who would think but little of an earl for a leader, are eager to follow me: and if thou still doubt what this may mean, abide, till in two days or three thou see me before the foeman.

With the exception of Harry Keeler, who posed a direct threat to the Abiders, he had yet to see or hear of an Interloper killing a human being.

For I spake with thee, it is nigh two years agone, when thou wert abiding the coming of our Lady in the castle yonder But now I see of thee that thou art brighter-faced, and mightier of aspect than aforetime, and it is in my mind that the Lady of Abundance must have loved thee and holpen thee, and blessed thee with some great blessing.

He was almost convinced that reducing a tree to lumber expunged whatever might be abiding within when he saw the long, hooked tongue emerge from the wall behind the bed.

After seeing Abie Singleton at the club last night, he suspected sleep was to become but a bitter memory.

Though Abigail had averred his invitation, she had offered to assuage his disappointment by seeing him off.

The fact that you saw what you did confirms your ability to be functional at our destination.

O Queen Rabesqurat, the haven of our voyage was Aklis, and we feared delay, seeing the fire of the mountain ablaze with expectations of us.

Behind the closed gates, I could see that the house was ablaze with light and merriment.