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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

second

I.number
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a first/second/third etc edition
▪ The first edition was published in 1986.
a second chance/another chance
▪ The interview went badly, so I didn’t think they would give me a second chance.
a second language (=a language you speak that is not your first language)
▪ Most of the students learned English as their second language.
a second/follow-up interview (=a more detailed interview after you have been successful in a previous interview)
▪ She was asked back for a second interview.
beat sb into second/third etc place
▪ He was beaten into second place in the Monaco Grand Prix.
closing stages/seconds/minutes etc
▪ in the closing years of his life
come first/second etc
▪ She came first in the 200 metres.
come first/second/third etc in a competition
▪ Stuart came second in the swimming competition.
come in first/second etc
▪ His horse came in second to last.
come off second best (=lose a game or competition, or not be as successful as someone else)
engage first/second etc gear (=put the car into gear)
▪ Nick struggled to engage first gear.
enter its third week/sixth day/second year etc
▪ The talks have now entered their third week.
every few seconds/ten days etc
▪ Re-apply your sunscreen every two hours.
finish first/second/third etc
▪ He finished second in the 100 metres, behind Ben Johnson.
first/second etc prize
▪ She won first prize in a poetry competition.
first/second etc quarter earnings (=the amount a company earns during one of the four periods of three months that make up a financial year)
▪ The company’s fourth quarter earnings are excellent.
first/second/last post (=the first, second, or last collection or delivery of letters each day)
▪ The last post is at 5.30.
first/second/next etc in line for
▪ He must be first in line for the editor’s job.
first/second/sixth etc form
▪ examinations taken in the fourth form
first/second/third class honours degree
first/second/third etc gear
▪ The heavy traffic meant that we seldom got out of second gear.
get/buy sth second hand
▪ We got most of our furniture second hand.
heard...second hand
▪ It may not be true – I only heard it second hand.
motion...seconded (=formally supported)
▪ The motion was seconded by Mr. Levin.
on the first/second etc attempt (also at the first/second etc attempt British English)
▪ The car started at the second attempt.
put the car etc into (first/second/third etc) gear
▪ He put the car into gear, and they moved slowly forwards.
sb's first/second/last etc appearance
▪ This is the band's last appearance in the UK before a 46-date tour of Europe.
sb’s first/second etc marriage
▪ She had two children from her first marriage.
sb’s first/second try
▪ This is his first try at directing.
second base
second best
▪ Allie was the second best shooter on the rifle team.
second best
▪ I’m not going to settle for second best.
second childhood
second class
second hand
▪ We got most of our furniture second hand.
second hand
second home
▪ town-dwellers who buy second homes in the countryside
second language
second lieutenant
Second Life
second name
▪ ‘What’s your second name?’ ‘Jones.’
second person
second sight
second/next to last (=last except for one other)
▪ the second to last paragraph
seconds/moments/minutes/hours
▪ We knew we only had a few more precious hours together.
second/third etc from bottom
▪ United currently lie second from bottom of the Premier League.
settle for second best
▪ I’m not going to settle for second best.
split second
▪ For a split second the two men hesitated.
State Second Pension, the
the first/second etc draft
▪ The second draft of the agreement contained a few important changes.
the first/second etc quarter
▪ in the last quarter of the 19th century
the first/second etc tier
▪ The second tier of the programme is in-house training.
the first/second half of the century
▪ In the second half of the century, people's wages began to rise.
the first/second half
▪ Profits doubled in the first half of the year.
the first/second/third/fourth quarter
▪ The home side took the lead in the second quarter.
the first/second/third/fourth quarter
▪ The company’s profits rose by 11% in the first quarter of the year.
the Premier/First/Second/Third/Fourth Division
▪ a second-division club
the second team (=the team with players who are not as good as those in the first team)
▪ He stepped up from the second team when Roberts was injured.
tie for first/second etc place
▪ Woosnam and Lyle tied for fourth place on 264.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(at) second/third/fourth hand
▪ A computer virus A watch with a second hand doing double time.
▪ Deathtraps: Coroner's warning over second hand electrical goods.
▪ Other rates may apply where the development is acquired second hand, or is merely a refurbishment of an existing industrial building.
▪ The Fourth Hand glides to a soft landing in Wisconsin, and readers will be left smiling.
▪ The leader takes a watch with a second hand, points to a player and calls out a letter of the alphabet.
▪ The second hand had its own dial at the bottom of the face.
▪ The story is now taken up at second hand.
▪ There is even a chapter on buying second hand - which has to be a boon for other Leica devotees.
First Class/Second Class Honours
a matter of seconds/weeks/hours etc
▪ Already we read that within a matter of weeks the number of the believers was 120.
▪ At least 30 rounds went off in a matter of seconds.
▪ But these days, the time between orders and shipments has shrunk to a matter of weeks.
▪ Hay says that Sarin would normally degrade in an open environment in a matter of hours.
▪ It seemed to the rector that it all happened within a matter of seconds.
▪ Many other soy sauces are chemically produced in a matter of hours.
▪ More to the point, he prevailed on Amelia to write the text in a matter of weeks.
▪ The new cabinet and other ministerial appointments are announced within a matter of days, sometimes within a matter of hours.
a poor second/third etc
▪ All in all marriage was a pragmatic affair and individual desires came a poor second to the harmony of the group.
▪ Food was taking a poor second on my diet sheet this evening.
▪ It is true though, that where waters are absolutely saturated with maggots, even bread comes a poor second.
▪ Peter hit a poor drive and a poor second, to the right of a nasty greenside bunker.
▪ Saturn is a poor third, and Jupiter is dead last.
▪ The passenger has always come a poor second to the operational integrity of the system.
▪ The Socialists would come a poor second with 26.5%; the Communists could expect no more than 7%.
▪ They have a poor third quarter.
a split second
another/a second bite at the cherry
be first/second/next etc in line to the throne
be placed first/second etc
▪ But it is unwise to assume that parents will inevitably pose a problem when they are placed first.
▪ Fiona Burgess was placed second with Jenny Dwyer improving on past form to gain third position.
▪ Inside the bracket the symbol of the central atom is placed first.
dying moment/minutes/seconds
▪ And, in the dying seconds, Miklosko blocked Smillie's close-range effort.
▪ Hereford usually crack or collapse in the dying minutes.
▪ In the dying minutes, full-back, Paul Bodin burst through.
▪ Jason Chandler made certain in the dying minutes of the game, Good Sports winning 2-1.
▪ One moment of astonishing creativity in the dying seconds on Saturday transported him to the centre of Arsenal's universe.
▪ Sean Farrell popped in the opener and Danny Allsopp made sure of the points in the dying seconds.
▪ The World Champion launched a direct attack in the dying moments of the first session.
first/second etc year
▪ By his second year, he said, nearly 30 schools were sending him letters.
▪ Early in the first year his behaviour pattern was showing dips and troughs.
▪ Everything about it has helped me to grapple with the intricacies of machine knitting in this, my second year.
▪ He had discussed this throughout his first year but had found no solution.
▪ In her second year, she met Edgar Lintot.
▪ Oryx Energy, like Melville, made the list for a second year in a row.
▪ That first year, by happy accident, the itinerary was set for every ride that has followed.
first/second/sixth etc former
▪ Debbie is a sixth former at Abergele High School.
first/second/third etc place
▪ But I think I got into drama professionally in the first place by accident.
▪ But it's even more of a comfort for baby if he doesn't get wind in the first place.
▪ In the opening 250 race Robert Dunlop stayed well clear of a hectic battle for second place behind him.
▪ In the second place, it involves some intention to maintain that control on the part of the possessor.
▪ The firm which supplied the scaffold blames the boy's parents for letting him play there in the first place.
▪ There is almost a tinge of predestination in footballers' reflections on how they came to sport in the first place.
▪ We never enjoyed them in the first place.
▪ Why had they come to this country in the first place?
half a minute/moment/second etc
▪ Add bean sprouts and cook another half minute.
▪ After one and a half minutes the aircraft began to overshoot, correctly making an initial turn to the west.
▪ I pulled to the curb for half a minute.
▪ Poole and Bowman studied the screen in silence for half a minute.
▪ Report repeated two and a half second ticking sounds from plane.
▪ The fireball is visible for about half a minute before the object exits from the atmosphere with its original speed virtually undiminished.
▪ The fireball that came with the flash lasted for half a second and enveloped the whole stumbling figure.
in the dying minutes/seconds/moments (of sth)
▪ And, in the dying seconds, Miklosko blocked Smillie's close-range effort.
▪ Hereford usually crack or collapse in the dying minutes.
▪ Jason Chandler made certain in the dying minutes of the game, Good Sports winning 2-1.
▪ One moment of astonishing creativity in the dying seconds on Saturday transported him to the centre of Arsenal's universe.
▪ Sean Farrell popped in the opener and Danny Allsopp made sure of the points in the dying seconds.
▪ The World Champion launched a direct attack in the dying moments of the first session.
just a minute/second/moment
Just a minute, that's not what she told us.
Just a minute. Let me see if he's here.
▪ And he had deliberately caught his flight with just minutes to spare.
▪ Aronoff, who asked to be arraigned today, appeared before the media for just minutes Thursday to read a brief statement.
▪ For just a moment there, tournament golf had taken its toll: Saavedra had lost the head.
▪ I wan na wait, wait, wait just a second.
▪ It takes just a second: One car plows into another and the backup begins.
▪ It went dead for just a second.
▪ Let's continue the story for just a moment in a ridiculous way.
▪ Neighbours pulled her to safety just minutes before flames took hold.
lie (in) second/third/fourth etc (place)
▪ After his win in Frankfurt on Sunday, he lies second in the series just behind Michel Robert.
▪ Driving a Banbury prepared Prodrive Subaru, McRae now lies third in the championship.
not give sth a second thought/another thought
play second fiddle (to sb)
▪ He was never more than a B-movie actor, playing second fiddle to actors like Errol Flynn.
▪ But putts and drives will play second fiddle to schmoozing when top sports celebrities take center stage at the golf club.
▪ Even the lyrics tend to play second fiddle and are generally added after the main melody has been composed.
▪ He had been a reluctant ally and may well have resented playing second fiddle to his younger brother.
▪ Mr Pozsgay was simply fed up with playing second fiddle, a characteristic that was to re-emerge later.
▪ She might also have simply got tired of playing second fiddle to the Prince's pastimes.
▪ So often he has played second fiddle to Wright and notched only nine goals last season to his partner's 30.
▪ The locals were not satisfied playing second fiddle to Los Angeles.
▪ Throughout her married life she had to play second fiddle to the interests of her husband.
take second place (to sb/sth)
▪ However, religious identity had taken second place to secular nationalism for a whole generation.
▪ However, toilet training took second place to skill with weapons or natural aggression.
▪ It's not unusual for man to be put in this position of taking second place.
▪ Nina was telling Joe that she was here to help but not to take second place to his wife.
▪ Since she was utterly devoted to my father, her children inevitably took second place.
▪ Spider then is able to confront his fear and on the big night, he takes second place in the spelling bee.
▪ There was criticism that books took second place, even when it came to the design of the building.
▪ Words take second place to nonverbal cues, personal mannerisms, gestures, expressions, and overall appearance.
the 10-second/40% etc barrier
three minutes/ten seconds etc flat
two points/five seconds etc adrift (of sb)
wait a minute/second/moment etc
▪ And wait a minute ... Sage Derby.
▪ And hey, wait a minute.
▪ Beth, can it wait a minute?
▪ But wait a minute! - Wasn't that blood?
▪ But wait a minute, what's this?
▪ I rounded the corner, then stopped, waited a moment and peeked back into the lobby.
▪ They come back, you know, if I wait a minute.
▪ Ward waited a moment by the door.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A second, then third decimation began.
▪ Another forecaster places it second, and two others pick it to tie for runner-up.
▪ He is not paid £20 million a year to come second.
▪ The second was a glass dome, the size of a man, and a little taller than our hero.
▪ Thus this second part is simply the tape that supposed to act on.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
only
▪ Given any number, it takes her only a second to work out the combination of smaller numbers which add up to it.
▪ The computation of probabilities took Jezrael only seconds.
▪ Now there are only seconds between the sharp bends.
▪ The van burst into flames, giving the two occupants only seconds to get out before it was engulfed.
▪ By now, only seconds after the alarm had been raised, the fire was already well established along its full length.
▪ She knew it was only seconds.
▪ Donna had only seconds to appreciate its beauty; she had other things on her mind.
▪ I was frightened, of course, but only for a second or two.
split
▪ Grant flung himself to one side ... but this time he was just a split second too late.
▪ For a split second, Constance failed to realise that he had released his grip on her.
▪ Unbelievably, for a split second, he was sure he saw a look of relief on the face of Nell Anderson.
▪ In a split second of surprised immobility, Grant saw the deadly muzzle come to bear on him.
▪ In that split second, as she and Benton fell from the train, Donna knew.
▪ It occurred to him, in that split second, to let it fall.
▪ The training officer lifted the phone, and the buzz in the room subsided in a split second.
■ NOUN
half
▪ Analysts are looking for full-year profits approaching £160m, after the important second half.
▪ Arizona made 20 miscues against Oregon State, including a dozen in that sloppy second half.
▪ He put in a superb second half, scored twice and Palace had to come home defeated by 2-3.
▪ Between 1900 and 1910, more people migrated to the United States than in the entire second half of the nineteenth century.
■ VERB
last
▪ The witnesses would say later that the searingly brilliant white flash seemed to last for several seconds.
▪ Ferguson lasted a little longer 17 seconds into the second round than Michael Dokes did in Bowe's first title defence last February.
▪ He gave only one kind of sound, a grating, even-toned grunt that lasted about one second.
▪ It lasted only ten seconds and it was at four in the morning when nobody was around.
▪ Different films were again separated by a blue field lasting five seconds.
▪ The drumroll lasts a second or two.
wait
▪ He waited a few seconds then got into the car and started it up.
▪ I guess so. Wait here a second.
▪ His pursuer smiled grimly, and waited as many seconds as he dared before heaving himself over the wall with surprising agility.
▪ I told myself to wait a second, get a better grip, try it again.
▪ Up in the bows, one of the bureaucrats flashed a torch twice, waited five seconds and repeated the signal.
▪ But wait, Walt, wait another second.
▪ Apply it over the boards with a roller, wait a few seconds, then wipe it up with a clean cloth.
▪ He waited for a few seconds, but the noise did not repeat itself.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Well, first of all, it's too expensive and second, we don't have anywhere to put it.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A second, then third decimation began.
▪ Another forecaster places it second, and two others pick it to tie for runner-up.
▪ He is not paid £20 million a year to come second.
▪ Left fielder Mark Whiten reached out and poked a tailing fastball over the left-field wall in the second.
▪ Ruth understood why in that tender, desperate second.
▪ The second was a glass dome, the size of a man, and a little taller than our hero.
III.adverb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ VERB
come
▪ The college confirmed that he came second.
▪ The West Bank story came second.
▪ Morgan Stanley Dean Witter came second.
finish
▪ The United States, who finished second, were disqualified for an illegal changeover.
▪ Milbrett finished second in scoring with 15 goals and nine assists for the U.S. women's team.
▪ She made the Olympic team last week, then finished second in the 200 backstroke on Monday.
▪ In the first event, he finished second.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But, second, in the vast majority of markets, efficient production can be attained with a high degree of competition.
IV.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
motion
▪ He sat down to applause and was followed by H B Beale from Gloucestershire who seconded the motion.
staff
▪ I was seconded to the staff of General Schwarzkopf.
■ VERB
propose
▪ These were proposed by and seconded by and carried unanimously.
▪ Names must be proposed and seconded.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(at) second/third/fourth hand
▪ A computer virus A watch with a second hand doing double time.
▪ Deathtraps: Coroner's warning over second hand electrical goods.
▪ Other rates may apply where the development is acquired second hand, or is merely a refurbishment of an existing industrial building.
▪ The Fourth Hand glides to a soft landing in Wisconsin, and readers will be left smiling.
▪ The leader takes a watch with a second hand, points to a player and calls out a letter of the alphabet.
▪ The second hand had its own dial at the bottom of the face.
▪ The story is now taken up at second hand.
▪ There is even a chapter on buying second hand - which has to be a boon for other Leica devotees.
First Class/Second Class Honours
a matter of seconds/weeks/hours etc
▪ Already we read that within a matter of weeks the number of the believers was 120.
▪ At least 30 rounds went off in a matter of seconds.
▪ But these days, the time between orders and shipments has shrunk to a matter of weeks.
▪ Hay says that Sarin would normally degrade in an open environment in a matter of hours.
▪ It seemed to the rector that it all happened within a matter of seconds.
▪ Many other soy sauces are chemically produced in a matter of hours.
▪ More to the point, he prevailed on Amelia to write the text in a matter of weeks.
▪ The new cabinet and other ministerial appointments are announced within a matter of days, sometimes within a matter of hours.
a poor second/third etc
▪ All in all marriage was a pragmatic affair and individual desires came a poor second to the harmony of the group.
▪ Food was taking a poor second on my diet sheet this evening.
▪ It is true though, that where waters are absolutely saturated with maggots, even bread comes a poor second.
▪ Peter hit a poor drive and a poor second, to the right of a nasty greenside bunker.
▪ Saturn is a poor third, and Jupiter is dead last.
▪ The passenger has always come a poor second to the operational integrity of the system.
▪ The Socialists would come a poor second with 26.5%; the Communists could expect no more than 7%.
▪ They have a poor third quarter.
a split second
another/a second bite at the cherry
be first/second/next etc in line to the throne
dying moment/minutes/seconds
▪ And, in the dying seconds, Miklosko blocked Smillie's close-range effort.
▪ Hereford usually crack or collapse in the dying minutes.
▪ In the dying minutes, full-back, Paul Bodin burst through.
▪ Jason Chandler made certain in the dying minutes of the game, Good Sports winning 2-1.
▪ One moment of astonishing creativity in the dying seconds on Saturday transported him to the centre of Arsenal's universe.
▪ Sean Farrell popped in the opener and Danny Allsopp made sure of the points in the dying seconds.
▪ The World Champion launched a direct attack in the dying moments of the first session.
first/second etc year
▪ By his second year, he said, nearly 30 schools were sending him letters.
▪ Early in the first year his behaviour pattern was showing dips and troughs.
▪ Everything about it has helped me to grapple with the intricacies of machine knitting in this, my second year.
▪ He had discussed this throughout his first year but had found no solution.
▪ In her second year, she met Edgar Lintot.
▪ Oryx Energy, like Melville, made the list for a second year in a row.
▪ That first year, by happy accident, the itinerary was set for every ride that has followed.
first/second/sixth etc former
▪ Debbie is a sixth former at Abergele High School.
first/second/third etc place
▪ But I think I got into drama professionally in the first place by accident.
▪ But it's even more of a comfort for baby if he doesn't get wind in the first place.
▪ In the opening 250 race Robert Dunlop stayed well clear of a hectic battle for second place behind him.
▪ In the second place, it involves some intention to maintain that control on the part of the possessor.
▪ The firm which supplied the scaffold blames the boy's parents for letting him play there in the first place.
▪ There is almost a tinge of predestination in footballers' reflections on how they came to sport in the first place.
▪ We never enjoyed them in the first place.
▪ Why had they come to this country in the first place?
half a minute/moment/second etc
▪ Add bean sprouts and cook another half minute.
▪ After one and a half minutes the aircraft began to overshoot, correctly making an initial turn to the west.
▪ I pulled to the curb for half a minute.
▪ Poole and Bowman studied the screen in silence for half a minute.
▪ Report repeated two and a half second ticking sounds from plane.
▪ The fireball is visible for about half a minute before the object exits from the atmosphere with its original speed virtually undiminished.
▪ The fireball that came with the flash lasted for half a second and enveloped the whole stumbling figure.
just a minute/second/moment
Just a minute, that's not what she told us.
Just a minute. Let me see if he's here.
▪ And he had deliberately caught his flight with just minutes to spare.
▪ Aronoff, who asked to be arraigned today, appeared before the media for just minutes Thursday to read a brief statement.
▪ For just a moment there, tournament golf had taken its toll: Saavedra had lost the head.
▪ I wan na wait, wait, wait just a second.
▪ It takes just a second: One car plows into another and the backup begins.
▪ It went dead for just a second.
▪ Let's continue the story for just a moment in a ridiculous way.
▪ Neighbours pulled her to safety just minutes before flames took hold.
take second place (to sb/sth)
▪ However, religious identity had taken second place to secular nationalism for a whole generation.
▪ However, toilet training took second place to skill with weapons or natural aggression.
▪ It's not unusual for man to be put in this position of taking second place.
▪ Nina was telling Joe that she was here to help but not to take second place to his wife.
▪ Since she was utterly devoted to my father, her children inevitably took second place.
▪ Spider then is able to confront his fear and on the big night, he takes second place in the spelling bee.
▪ There was criticism that books took second place, even when it came to the design of the building.
▪ Words take second place to nonverbal cues, personal mannerisms, gestures, expressions, and overall appearance.
the 10-second/40% etc barrier
three minutes/ten seconds etc flat
two points/five seconds etc adrift (of sb)
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Alderman Keane nominated him and eighteen other committeemen made lengthy speeches seconding the nomination.
▪ Mr Nichol has been seconded to the region for a special project, studying the effects of community care throughout the country.
▪ These economic pressures were seconded by the intrusion of the state.
▪ With Harman's blessing they were seconding her.
V.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
staff
▪ I was seconded to the staff of General Schwarzkopf.
■ VERB
propose
▪ These were proposed by and seconded by and carried unanimously.
▪ Names must be proposed and seconded.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A quieter but potentially important project is currently under way by Sir John Boreham who has been seconded from the government statistical office.
▪ In addition to financial support, personnel are sometimes seconded to projects and charities.
▪ My father works for an oil company and last summer he was seconded to their Texas headquarters for five years.
▪ These economic pressures were seconded by the intrusion of the state.
▪ With Harman's blessing they were seconding her.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Second

Second \Sec"ond\, a. [F., fr. L. secundus second, properly, following, fr. sequi to follow. See Sue to follow, and cf. Secund.]

  1. Immediately following the first; next to the first in order of place or time; hence, occurring again; another; other.

    And he slept and dreamed the second time.
    --Gen. xli. 5.

  2. Next to the first in value, power, excellence, dignity, or rank; secondary; subordinate; inferior.

    May the day when we become the second people upon earth . . . be the day of our utter extirpation.
    --Landor.

  3. Being of the same kind as another that has preceded; another, like a prototype; as, a second Cato; a second Troy; a second deluge.

    A Daniel, still say I, a second Daniel!
    --Shak.

    Second Adventist. See Adventist.

    Second cousin, the child of a cousin.

    Second-cut file. See under File.

    Second distance (Art), that part of a picture between the foreground and the background; -- called also middle ground, or middle distance. [R.]

    Second estate (Eng.), the House of Peers.

    Second girl, a female house-servant who does the lighter work, as chamber work or waiting on table.

    Second intention. See under Intention.

    Second story, Second floor, in America, the second range of rooms from the street level. This, in England, is called the first floor, the one beneath being the ground floor.

    Second thought or Second thoughts, consideration of a matter following a first impulse or impression; reconsideration.

    On second thoughts, gentlemen, I don't wish you had known him.
    --Dickens.

Second

Second \Sec"ond\, n.

  1. One who, or that which, follows, or comes after; one next and inferior in place, time, rank, importance, excellence, or power.

    Man An angel's second, nor his second long.
    --Young.

  2. One who follows or attends another for his support and aid; a backer; an assistant; specifically, one who acts as another's aid in a duel.

    Being sure enough of seconds after the first onset.
    --Sir H. Wotton.

  3. Aid; assistance; help. [Obs.]

    Give second, and my love Is everlasting thine.
    --J. Fletcher.

  4. pl. An article of merchandise of a grade inferior to the best; esp., a coarse or inferior kind of flour.

  5. [F. seconde. See Second, a.] The sixtieth part of a minute of time or of a minute of space, that is, the second regular subdivision of the degree; as, sound moves about 1,140 English feet in a second; five minutes and ten seconds north of this place.

  6. In the duodecimal system of mensuration, the twelfth part of an inch or prime; a line. See Inch, and Prime, n., 8.

  7. (Mus.)

    1. The interval between any tone and the tone which is represented on the degree of the staff next above it.

    2. The second part in a concerted piece; -- often popularly applied to the alto.

  8. (Parliamentary Procedure) A motion in support of another motion which has been moved in a deliberative body; a motion without a second dies without discussion.

    Second hand, the hand which marks the seconds on the dial of a watch or a clock.

Second

Second \Sec"ond\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Seconded; p. pr. & vb. n. Seconding.] [Cf. F. seconder, L. secundare, from secundus. See Second, a.]

  1. To follow in the next place; to succeed; to alternate.

    In the method of nature, a low valley is immediately seconded with an ambitious hill.
    --Fuller.

    Sin is seconded with sin.
    --South.

  2. To follow or attend for the purpose of assisting; to support; to back; to act as the second of; to assist; to forward; to encourage.

    We have supplies to second our attempt.
    --Shak.

    In human works though labored on with pain, A thousand movements scarce one purpose gain; In God's, one single can its end produce, Yet serves to second too some other use.
    --Pope.

  3. Specifically, (Parliamentary Procedure) to support, as a motion[6] or proposal, by adding one's voice to that of the mover or proposer.

    Note: Under common parliamentary rules used by many organizations, especially legislative bodies, a motion must be seconded in order to come properly before the deliberative body for discussion. Any motion[6] for which there is no second[8] dies for lack thereof.

Wiktionary

second

Etymology 1

  1. Number-two; following after the first one with nothing between them. The ordinal number corresponding to the cardinal number two. adv. 1 (context with superlative English) At the second rank. 2 After the first occurrence but before the third occurrence. alt. 1 (context with superlative English) At the second rank. 2 After the first occurrence but before the third occurrence. n. 1 One that is number two in a series. 2 One that is next in rank, quality, precedence, position, status, or authority. 3 The place that is next below first in a race or contest. 4 (context usually in the plural English) A manufactured item that, though still usable, fails to meet quality control standards. 5 (context usually in the plural English) An additional helping of food. 6 A chance or attempt to achieve what should have been done the first time, usually indicating success this time around. (See second-guess.) 7 (context music English) The interval between two adjacent notes in a diatonic scale (either or both of them may be raised or lowered from the basic scale via any type of accidental). 8 The second gear of an engine. 9 (context baseball English) second base. v

  2. 1 (context transitive English) To agree as a second person to (a proposal), usually to reach a necessary quorum of two. (See under #Etymology 3 for translations.) 2 To follow in the next place; to succeed. 3 (context climbing English) To climb after a lead climber. Etymology 2

    alt. 1 The SI unit of time, defined as the duration of 9,192,631,770 periods of radiation corresponding to the transition between two hyperfine levels of caesium-133 in a ground state at a temperature of absolute zero and at rest; one-sixtieth of a minute. 2 A unit of angle equal to one-sixtieth of a minute of arc or one part in 3600 of a degree. 3 A short, indeterminate amount of time. n. 1 The SI unit of time, defined as the duration of 9,192,631,770 periods of radiation corresponding to the transition between two hyperfine levels of caesium-133 in a ground state at a temperature of absolute zero and at rest; one-sixtieth of a minute. 2 A unit of angle equal to one-sixtieth of a minute of arc or one part in 3600 of a degree. 3 A short, indeterminate amount of time. Etymology 3

    n. 1 One who supports another in a contest or combat, such as a dueller's assistant. 2 One who agrees in addition, or such a motion, as required in certain meetings to pass judgement et

  3. 3 (context obsolete English) Aid; assistance; help. vb. 1 (context transitive UK English) To transfer temporarily to alternative employment. 2 (context transitive English) To assist or support; to back. 3 (context transitive English) To agree as a second person to (a proposal), usually to reach a necessary quorum of two. (This may come from the English adjective above.)

Wikipedia

Second (disambiguation)

A second is a unit of time.

Second or Seconds may also refer to

Second (parliamentary procedure)

In deliberative bodies a second to a proposed motion is an indication that there is at least one person besides the mover that is interested in seeing the motion come before the meeting. It does not necessarily indicate that the seconder favors the motion.

Second (Baroness album)

Second is the second official recording by the metal band Baroness. It was recorded in one session, with the exception of the vocals. The art work was done by Baroness singer John Baizley.

Second (curling)

In curling, the second is the person who delivers the second pair of stones. On most teams, where the second does not act as skip or vice, the second will sweep for each of his teammates. Due to the free-guard rule, which prevents some early stones from being removed from play by the leads, the second is usually a curler with a high degree of proficiency throwing takeouts, peels, and other power shots.

Second

The second (symbol: s) (abbreviated s or sec) is the base unit of time in the International System of Units (SI). It is qualitatively defined as the second division of the hour by sixty, the first division by sixty being the minute. It is quantitatively defined in terms of exactly 9,192,631,770 periods of a certain frequency of radiation from the caesium atom: a so-called atomic clock. Seconds may be measured using a mechanical, electric or atomic clock.

SI prefixes are combined with the word second to denote subdivisions of the second, e.g., the millisecond (one thousandth of a second), the microsecond (one millionth of a second), and the nanosecond (one billionth of a second). Though SI prefixes may also be used to form multiples of the second such as kilosecond (one thousand seconds), such units are rarely used in practice. The more common larger non-SI units of time are not formed by powers of ten; instead, the second is multiplied by 60 to form a minute, which is multiplied by 60 to form an hour, which is multiplied by 24 to form a day.

The second is also the base unit of time in other systems of measurement: the centimetre–gram–second, metre–kilogram–second, metre–tonne–second, and foot–pound–second systems of units.

WordNet

second

  1. adj. coming next after the first in position in space or time or degree or magnitude [syn: 2nd, 2d]

  2. coming next after first; "a second chance"; "the second vice president"

  3. a part or voice or instrument or orchestra section lower in pitch than or subordinate to the first; "second flute"; "the second violins" [ant: first]

  4. having the second highest gear ratio; "second gear"

second

adv. in the second place; "second, we must consider the economy" [syn: secondly]

second

  1. v. give support or one's approval to; "I'll second that motion"; "I can't back this plan"; "endorse a new project" [syn: back, endorse, indorse]

  2. transfer an employee to a different, temporary assignment; "The officer was seconded for duty overseas"

second

  1. n. 1/60 of a minute; the basic unit of time adopted under the Systeme International d'Unites [syn: sec, s]

  2. an indefinitely short time; "wait just a moment"; "it only takes a minute"; "in just a bit" [syn: moment, minute, bit]

  3. the fielding position of the player on a baseball team who is stationed near 2nd base [syn: second base]

  4. a particular point in time; "the moment he arrived the party began" [syn: moment, minute, instant]

  5. following the first in an ordering or series; "he came in a close second"

  6. a 60th part of a minute of arc; "the treasure is 2 minutes and 45 seconds south of here" [syn: arcsecond]

  7. the official attendant of a contestant in a duel or boxing match

  8. a speech seconding a motion; "do I hear a second?" [syn: secondment, endorsement, indorsement]

  9. the gear that has the second lowest forward gear ratio in the gear box of a motor vehicle; "he had to shift down into second to make the hill" [syn: second gear]

  10. merchandise that has imperfections; usually sold at a reduced price without the brand name [syn: irregular]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

second

"one-sixtieth of a minute of degree," also "sixtieth part of a minute of time," late 14c. in geometry, from Old French seconde, from Medieval Latin secunda, short for secunda pars minuta "second diminished part," the result of the second division of the hour by sixty (the first being the "prime minute," now called the minute), from Latin secunda, fem. of secundus (see second (adj.)). The second hand of a clock is attested from 1759.

second

1580s, "to support or represent in a duel, fight, etc.," from Middle French seconder, from Latin secundare "to assist, make favorable," from secundus "assisting, favorable, following, second" (see second (adj.)). The parliamentary sense is first recorded 1590s. Related: Seconded; seconding.

second

"assistant, supporter," 1580s, from second (v.).

second

"next after first," c.1300, from Old French second, secont, and directly from Latin secundus "following, next in time or order," also "secondary, subordinate, inferior," from root of sequi "follow" (see sequel). Replaced native other in this sense because of the ambiguousness of the earlier word. Second sight is from 1610s; an etymologically perverse term, because it means in reality the sight of events before, not after, they occur. Second fiddle first attested 1809:\n\nA metaphor borrowed from a musical performer who plays the second or counter to one who plays the first or the "air."

[Bartlett, "Dictionary of Americanisms," 1848]

Gazetteer

Usage examples of "second".

For a split second Abie was certain he was looking directly into her eyes as the volume of the chanting increased.

If given the chance, she would have rejoined the Order, but for those who abjure their vows, there is never a second chance.

The second is when he has abjured al heresy in general, and yet lapses into another heresy, even if he has never before been suspected or accused of that heresy.

Even the news that the Yorktown, after quelling the fires and resuming fleet speed, had been torpedoed in a second attack, was again ablaze and listing, and might be abandoned, could be taken in stride.

He was ably seconded by General Thomas West Sherman, commanding the troops.

In a second she was giving her own breakfast to Abo, who neither thanked her or acknowledged her presence.

Malink was hurling a string of native curses at Abo, who looked as if he would burst into tears any second.

Second, there are so many embryos available from other sources, there is no need to deal with aborted embryos.

In the second case, in a youth of sixteen, death occurred after washing out a deep abscess of the nates with the same solution.

There were eight runners that day, a pleasant sized field, and Abseil was second favourite.

If Glenn Abies is murdered, or if any harm comes to his wife or any one of his five innocent children then in the name of all that is Christian and Good, the second American Revolution will begin right here.

Very little careful examination would have sufficed to find, in the second section of the very first article of the Constitution, the names of every one of the thirteen then existent States distinctly mentioned, with the number of representatives to which each would be entitled, in case of acceding to the Constitution, until a census of their population could be taken.

Achieving this end required that Einstein forge a second link in the chain uniting gravity and accelerated motion: the curvature of space and time, to which we now turn.

His field of vision contracted until it embraced only the clock and the accelerometer, fifteen g, and four hundred and eighty seconds to go.

Very well, then, his name isDarian Acer, second son of the earl ofChesley .