Find the word definition

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

seat

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a chair leg/arm/back/seat
▪ The chair leg has broken.
a seat in parliament (=a position as member of parliament)
▪ If Morgan resigns his seat in Parliament, there will be a bye-election.
aisle seat (=seat next to the aisle)
▪ Would you like a window seat or an aisle seat?
back seat
▪ Finally, Bryant decided to take a back seat and let his son run the company.
book a seat
▪ She booked me a seat on the 9 am flight.
booster seat
bucket seat
car seat
catbird seat
child seat
country seat
ejector seat
first-class passenger/seat/compartment etc
front seat/row
▪ We got there an hour early in order to get seats in the front row.
have a seat on the board
▪ He gave up his seat on the board after 40 years' service.
love seat
passenger seat
reclining seat/chair
resign your seat (=announce that you will no longer be a member of a parliament, be on a committee etc)
▪ A majority of voters think he should resign his seat in Congress.
seat belt
seating capacity (=how many seats there are in a theatre, hall etc)
▪ The largest hall in the university has a seating capacity of over 1,500.
seating/sleeping arrangements (=plans for where people will sit/sleep)
▪ What are the seating arrangements for dinner?
take a seat (=sit down)
▪ Please take a seat.
the toilet seat
▪ He always left the toilet seat up.
wear a seat belt (=have it around yourself)
window seat
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
back
▪ In the back seat a thin face stared ahead.
▪ LoEshe, who was sitting in the back seat, was shot in the head.
▪ In the back seats, Angus and Sawney.
▪ Hector sits in the back seat of the front row, nearest the door.
▪ Get him in the back seat.
▪ It was also a year when investment bankers took a back seat.
▪ One of Thorpey's boys was helping the boyo I'd given the forearm to into the back seat.
▪ He reeled away as Barnabas was dragged into the back seat and muzzled.
driving
▪ What in the world would the company be like in a few years' time if such people were in the driving seat?
▪ Back in the driving seat for the first time in 40 years the memories came flooding back.
▪ Once Smith's penalty goal had cut the Cambridge lead to two points Oxford appeared to be in the driving seat.
▪ Then she tried to heave herself up on to the driving seat but couldn't manage without Dad's help.
▪ Voice over Paul sells the Mini driving seats for around five hundred pounds.
▪ Bullock found himself in the driving seat after Davies was forced to play sideways out of a ditch.
▪ Kev sat with eyes closed in the driving seat.
empty
▪ If you are going to reach people through the media, never have many empty seats.
▪ They were sitting in the front row, talking to each other over two empty seats.
▪ The many empty seats in the chamber attested to the opposition the proposals will receive as they are debated in coming weeks.
▪ First off, there were a good number of empty seats.
▪ The questioner should move to an empty seat as far away as possible.
▪ Primo waves his hand at his own reflection and that of the empty seat on the opposite side of the aisle.
▪ Her bêtenoire eased his long frame into the empty seat across the aisle.
front
▪ But the man who got into the front seat was Keith Hanger, an escaped prisoner wanted in connection with a murder.
▪ Helen and Mona and Callie bobbed on the springy front seat with Ralph.
▪ A few minutes later she slumped back into the front seat of the Granada.
▪ Head restraints have been required in the front seats of cars since 1969.
▪ The bloke who'd wanted to get on with it started to climb out of the front seat.
▪ He gets into the front seat without asking me.
▪ For front or rear seat use.
▪ The passenger in the front seat opened fire, he said, hitting the men.
hot
▪ City player-manager Peter Reid, still a rookie in the hot seat, has done a fine job since replacing Howard Kendall.
▪ Wilkinson and Manion will be in the hot seat.
▪ He was in the hot seat for more than three hours.
▪ There are as many as five coaches currently on the hot seat.
▪ The hot car seats stung the children's bare legs and made them cry out in protest.
▪ Because there is no way I would want to be on the hot seat Smith now finds himself.
▪ Tips Always address the person in the hot seat by the name of the character you have chosen.
▪ That mix-up was just one of several election problems that put then-Registrar of Voters Germaine Wong on the hot seat.
marginal
▪ In Cambridge, there was a campaign to persuade students to register in the city, which was a marginal Conservative seat.
▪ One of the country's two most marginal seats, Brecon and Radnor, also declares today.
▪ The Prime Minister rounded off his campaign by visiting two Tory marginal seats in south London.
▪ Mr Devlin's constituency was a marginal seat before Parliament was dissolved last week, having a majority of 774.
▪ I won a marginal seat and have held it on five successive occasions.
▪ In the 1979 and 1983 elections there were examples of locally popular candidates holding their marginal seats against the national swing.
▪ Yet London contains around 25 Labour-winnable marginal seats.
▪ But it produced critical evidence about how different designs of tax would hit marginal seats and heartland Tory ones.
parliamentary
▪ In 1942 she married James Hoy who gained the Leith parliamentary seat for Labour in the 1945 general election.
▪ He subsequently fought and held his parliamentary seat against his former party.
▪ Shevardnadze was expected to set about forming a coalition among some of the 36 parties which had contested parliamentary seats.
▪ Hannington unsuccessfully contested parliamentary seats in 1929, 1931, 1934, and 1950.
▪ The Alliance were briefly the controlling party in local government and just missed taking the Parliamentary seat at the 1987 election.
▪ As events were to demonstrate, eleven parliamentary seats or a difference of twenty-two votes in a parliamentary division were at stake.
▪ Election results Mahathir's coalition won 127 parliamentary seats, thereby securing its two-thirds majority.
▪ The socialists looked set to lose 200 or more of their 270 parliamentary seats.
rear
▪ The rear end of the console can be detached in order to transform the two individual rear seats into a bench accommodating three.
▪ There were eight empty liquor cartons tilted and wedged across the rear seat.
▪ He climbed into the rear seat of the ford.
▪ Aide Julie Hart noted that most safety experts have said children usually are safer in the rear seat in a crash.
▪ Headroom isn't such a problem, though, and actual rear seat comfort is very good.
▪ The 60-40 split fold-down rear seats afford the owner even more useful cargo room.
▪ It is easily lifted out from front or rear seat belts.
▪ He rode with Kirilenko in the rear seat of a black Volga.
safe
▪ But, as it was, he could expect to be made Solicitor-General and found a safe seat.
▪ The already safe seat at Wandsworth was divided in 1918 into five safe seats.
▪ He has not been included on the shortlist of 18 hopefuls for this supposedly safe Tory seat.
▪ The already safe seat at Wandsworth was divided in 1918 into five safe seats.
▪ It went down a treat with the matrons in safe seats like South-west Surrey.
▪ Given that most seats are safe seats for one party or another, this selection is usually tantamount to election.
▪ It will increase citizens' control over their elected representatives, by abolishing safe seats.
▪ I shall be in London, and my vote is in Taunton, a safe Tory seat.
vacant
▪ His vacant seat on the panel was filled, naturally enough, by William Harrison.
▪ She pointed to a vacant seat which was at the end of a row near the gangway.
■ NOUN
belt
▪ The sign comes on and Paul does up John's seat belt.
▪ Basu tried to stop them, her arm entangled in the seat belt.
▪ They can be secured by an adult lap and diagonal seat belt or a child harness.
▪ Pat got into the car, buckled the seat belt, folded her arms tight to her chest.
▪ Despite the fact he was wearing his seat belt he was hurled forward.
▪ And, she does not force her children to wear seat belts.
▪ In the short term the effect of the new seat belt legislation will be closely monitored.
bucket
▪ These are the colours of lines on Beck's map and also sometimes of station trims and new station bucket seats.
▪ Sherman and Maria are sitting in their tan leather bucket seats staring right at them.
▪ Even multimillionaires don't like getting blood all over their soft, beige leather bucket seats.
car
▪ Ensure you use the correct fitting kit for your make and model of car seat.
▪ When it came time to get a car seat, I looked up that category.
▪ The hot car seats stung the children's bare legs and made them cry out in protest.
▪ Officers found used hypodermic needles in a trailer in the backyard next to an infant car seat.
▪ Some baby seats can be converted into car seats for older children.
▪ Miguel told him, picking a spot opposite the car seat for the desk.
▪ Boots have stopped selling car seats but say they will offer further information to people who've bought the Rainbow seat.
▪ He thought about hiding it in the car seat, but Firebug was always moving the thing around.
love
▪ Helen bought her love seat, a sky blue velveteen fold-out, and also her bridge table.
▪ With mock surprise, he settled into the love seat, draping his arms along its top.
▪ And maybe a love seat too, that folded out to a bed, in case anyone wanted to stay.
▪ But he has no plans to replace the sofa and love seat Roberts left behind.
passenger
▪ They sat side by side in the double passenger seat, watching me as I approached.
▪ I got out of the passenger seat and turned to tell the driver she might as well go back to the airport.
▪ The compartment under the passenger seat in the front, right?
▪ His car was released to his fiancee, who was riding in the passenger seat and was sober, Ditzenberger said.
▪ As she did so she noticed a second man, who peered with interest from the passenger seat of the utility.
▪ Sarna said Miller was riding in the car when the driver lost control and crashed, throwing Miller from the passenger seat.
▪ Curtis settled himself behind the wheel and laid the empty can on the passenger seat.
ringside
▪ Meg had a ringside seat to research her latest role as a tough boxing coach.
▪ They were given ringside seats because of their devotion to Keiko.
▪ It was the first advertised air tour and the price included a ringside seat and hotel accommodation.
▪ You've got a ringside seat.
senate
▪ For the 100 Senate seats, there were 47 two-member counties and three members each for Warsaw and Katowice counties.
▪ Some 78 individuals presented their nomination papers for the presidency, 18 for the vice-presidency, and 265 for 24 Senate seats.
▪ He tried to shake up the race by resigning his Senate seat and shedding his tie.
window
▪ He paused by the window seat, a replica of one he had noticed at the other end of the gallery.
▪ They supply fresh insights, infuse you with energy and give up the window seat without complaint.
▪ Breathlessly she flung herself down on the window seat.
▪ Paul offers Bill the window seat.
▪ Clarisa passed him over to me at the window seat so she could pull out a change of clothes.
▪ Cara sat on a deep window seat, Laura beside her.
▪ Marge sat down on the window seat, and tucked her hair into the bandanna.
■ VERB
fill
▪ People began filling up the empty seats.
▪ San Marcos then held a special election to fill the open seat, for which Thibadeau campaigned and lost.
▪ He filled 80, 000 seats in a soccer stadium.
▪ These bargains are designed to fill airline seats or hotel rooms that would otherwise sit empty.
▪ And he knew he was the only one of them who could truly justify filling that empty seat.
▪ The Conservative margin is expected to be reduced to one after two upcoming elections are held to fill vacated seats.
gain
▪ In 1942 she married James Hoy who gained the Leith parliamentary seat for Labour in the 1945 general election.
▪ Since Sanders generally votes Democratic, the Democrats need to gain an additional 20 seats to win control of the House.
▪ Labour had gained over 130 seats, and for the first time in history it was the strongest party in the state.
▪ The winner would gain a seat on the City Council and would automatically be named mayor.
▪ The next grouping in this hastily cooked-up Assembly gained only 13 seats.
▪ Republicans gained two seats in the Senate and now enjoy a 55-45 majority in the Senate.
▪ Labour scored its biggest successes in London, where it gained a dozen seats on an above-average swing of 3.4 percent.
▪ Labour gained one seat but lost two in the by-election following appointment of aldermen.
hold
▪ Many councils are controlled by their political opponents, even in areas where Conservatives hold parliamentary seats with quite large majorities.
▪ The group of smaller Catholic parties allied with Berlusconi hold 34 seats.
▪ He subsequently fought and held his parliamentary seat against his former party.
▪ Republicans, at the moment, hold 41 seats while Democrats have 37.
▪ He was returned for Aldershot in 1970 and held the seat until 1997, when he did not seek re-election.
▪ The next largest party holds only 55 seats.
▪ Mr McLaughlin believes SinnFein will hold the seat in the by-election, which is likely to be held on Thursday October 21.
▪ Fini was the most determined opponent of Dini during his government, and his party holds 106 seats.
lose
▪ Despite losing the seat he has held for nine years Mr Lee managed to increase the Tory vote.
▪ While Brown lost eight seats in a heavily Republican year, Lockyer only lost one.
▪ Khan lost his seat in the 1991 elections, when a Hindu revivalist wave swept his constituency.
▪ If Republicans lose 21 seats, the Democrats will regain control of the House.
▪ Mr Patten lost his seat of Bath despite being the architect of Mr Major's 21-seat majority.
▪ They say the Tories are still looking for some one to blame for losing the seat.
▪ Second-term presidents historically lose their luster and energy by year six, and their party loses seats in Congress.
reserve
▪ Seat Reservations On all TransPennine services you are advised to reserve your seat in advance to ensure a comfortable journey.
▪ The Fat Controller had reserved good seats at the front of the stalls.
▪ It asked us to reserve our seats as soon as possible for this famous work by Shakespeare.
▪ But none of you has any choice because you all have reserved seats.
▪ Each day her youngsters have to reserve a seat at the table and no prior reservation means no meal.
▪ I must say it was an awful lot of rot, although we had reserved seats ....
resign
▪ On the defensive, Dole resigned his Kansas Senate seat on June 11.
▪ He tried to shake up the race by resigning his Senate seat and shedding his tie.
▪ He intended to resign his seat if he won the election.
▪ Garcia resigned his seat in January 1990, shortly before the two were sentenced to three years' imprisonment.
▪ Vice chairman Alan Noble resigned his seat on the board because of business commitments, but that wasn't the last of him.
▪ He resigned his South Dorset seat at the 1987 general election.
resume
▪ To escape it he pushed Iron Josh back into his chair and resumed his own seat.
▪ Madame Olenska rose, wound it up and returned to the fire, but without resuming her seat.
▪ They resumed their seats and Owen slipped away into a tide of music and colour.
▪ Winnie resumed her seat and her knitting.
▪ By the time Michele returned and resumed his seat she was sipping her wine, her plate almost empty.
▪ If your opponent interrupts you, resume your seat while he is speaking.
sit
▪ Compare the statement that he sat in a seat iii the circle.
▪ Grunt Six and the other captain sat on the bench seat facing forward.
▪ Jean sat back in her seat feeling numb and sad.
▪ I sat in my seat watching little white spots drift in front of me.
▪ The chief innovation however, were the 32 passengers who sat along wooden seats at each side.
▪ Williams just sat in his seat behind him, glaring.
▪ With another wistful sigh she sat back in her seat.
▪ She sat in the same seat during the summer when she was in his Level Two class.
take
▪ That her family had taken a back seat in her life.
▪ On Jan. 24 it was reported that 28 members of the Interim Legislative Assembly had taken their seats.
▪ The young man took the seat behind the cold metal desk and began to fire questions at me.
▪ He asked me to take a seat and listen to some music he would put on.
▪ The Labor Party, led by Shimon Peres, took 44 seats.
▪ But she didn't want to take a seat.
▪ I took the seat across from them in the booth.
win
▪ The separatists had won no seats at the last elections, in 1986.
▪ But in 1986 he won a seat in the House, and in 1994 was elected to the Senate.
▪ They lay Labour 4-7 to win most seats, Graham Robb's stable 5-4.
▪ The party won no seats in 1990, but regained forty-nine seats in 1994.
▪ In 1929 he won his Woodvale seat which he held until his death in 1949.
▪ NOWsupported candidates won several of those seats.
▪ The parliament was formed for those who won seats in the 1990 general election.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
back seat driver
be (sitting) in the catbird seat
be seated
▪ Helen was more than pleased to be seated beside Chris. She'd always wanted to meet him.
▪ Jan was seated near the door.
▪ John was seated on my left.
▪ Please be seated so we can start the meeting.
▪ The meal cannot start until everyone is seated.
▪ Example 3: Four girls were seated round a table, each writing individually.
▪ Once she was seated, he put his arms around her, cradling her fair head against his chest.
▪ Once the men are seated in the living room off the inside patio, they try to lure the children into conversation.
▪ She bade Demeter be seated and herself offered her honey-sweet wine, but the goddess would not taste it.
▪ She was seated on the Woolpack which was tied like a saddle to her Grey Horse.
▪ The other night, Deena was seated at a well-known, busy place near the Potomac River.
▪ They were seated on the far side, some in chairs, some leaning on the desk.
▪ To / two / too: There were two too many to be seated, too.
fly by the seat of your pants
get/put bums on seats
▪ When you can put bums on seats, then you can come and tell me what flights you want to travel on.
in the hot seat
▪ City player-manager Peter Reid, still a rookie in the hot seat, has done a fine job since replacing Howard Kendall.
▪ He was in the hot seat for more than three hours.
▪ Put them in the hot seat and question then to find out.
▪ This will help the person in the hot seat to become more relaxed and confident in the role of the character.
▪ Tips Always address the person in the hot seat by the name of the character you have chosen.
▪ We can put Ant in the hot seat to find out.
▪ Wilkinson and Manion will be in the hot seat.
marginal seat/constituency
▪ Another factor not taken into account before the election was the number of expatriate Tory voters registered in marginal constituencies.
▪ Hand in hand with this measure goes an equally bold re-focusing of Labour's strategy concerning marginal constituencies.
▪ In the 1979 and 1983 elections there were examples of locally popular candidates holding their marginal seats against the national swing.
▪ Mr Devlin's constituency was a marginal seat before Parliament was dissolved last week, having a majority of 774.
▪ One of the country's two most marginal seats, Brecon and Radnor, also declares today.
▪ She said Darlington had been chosen because it was a marginal constituency.
▪ The Prime Minister rounded off his campaign by visiting two Tory marginal seats in south London.
▪ There is a core vote-a traditional solid Labour support-in every constituency in the land, including marginal seats.
on the edge of your seat
▪ The movie's last scenes kept us on the edge of our seats.
▪ Chesarynth perched on the edge of her seat, fearing a poisoned needle in the cushions.
▪ From the moment he took the rostrum, Gergiev had his musicians tensely perched on the edge of their seats.
▪ He was waiting for her answer, not exactly on the edge of his seat, though.
▪ This dramatic opening had me on the edge of my seat!
▪ This keeps you on the edge of your seat.
▪ We're on the edge of our seats.
orchestra section/seats
resume your seat/place/position
▪ Will the delegates please resume their seats?
▪ By the time Michele returned and resumed his seat she was sipping her wine, her plate almost empty.
▪ If your opponent interrupts you, resume your seat while he is speaking.
▪ Madame Olenska rose, wound it up and returned to the fire, but without resuming her seat.
▪ Mr Scott resumed his place, a look of quiet satisfaction on his face.
▪ They resumed their seats and Owen slipped away into a tide of music and colour.
▪ Winnie resumed her seat and her knitting.
ringside seat
▪ It was the first advertised air tour and the price included a ringside seat and hotel accommodation.
▪ Meg had a ringside seat to research her latest role as a tough boxing coach.
▪ They were given ringside seats because of their devotion to Keiko.
▪ You've got a ringside seat.
take a back seat
▪ Women have often been forced to take a back seat in society.
▪ And very generally, the interests of lenders in New York take a back seat to the interests of the corporate borrowers.
▪ But when they were introduced, everything upstairs had to take a back seat.
▪ He notes, however, that economic considerations are taking a back seat to budget negotiations.
▪ If you can't agree to disagree, then take a back seat and let others have their way on this occasion.
▪ It was also a year when investment bankers took a back seat.
▪ Many feel reluctant to take a back seat and allow their children to enjoy the special attractiveness of the teens and twenties.
▪ Mr Peters has now taken a back seat.
▪ That her family had taken a back seat in her life.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ 'Slow down!' yelled Ben from the back seat.
▪ a seat on the board of directors
▪ a chair with a broken seat
▪ comfortable padded theater seats
▪ He leaned back in his seat and lit a cigarette.
▪ Our seats were right at the front of the airplane.
▪ Republicans hold 235 of the 435 seats in the House.
▪ There are two seats left in the back row.
▪ There was blood and broken glass all over the front seats.
▪ When we arrived, every seat was filled, so we stood at the back.
▪ Who left the toilet seat up?
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Communists catapulted from 45 to 157 seats in the 450-seat Duma to dominate a fractious chamber divided by eight political parties.
▪ Forza Italia has 110 seats, and Berlusconi has frequently changed his mind about whether Dini should stay in office.
▪ He believes they will win in the new town areas where they already have the local council seats sewn up.
▪ His left arm was jammed tight against the side of the seat.
▪ It was also a year when investment bankers took a back seat.
▪ Richard Corish held a seat in Wexford from 1921 until his death in 1945.
▪ There were three seats in our region, the Southeast.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
back
▪ The Captain was seated with his back to the door.
▪ Hansel seats himself on its back and asks his sister to join him.
▪ He could just see his Mercedes with Dillon seated in the back.
car
▪ The original cars seated 69, but the new one seated only 64.
chair
▪ When he had settled her, gently and with professional competence, he seated himself in the chair opposite.
desk
▪ She seated herself at the desk, relocated a floral display and smiled as the first patient walked into the room.
man
▪ Built in 1871, and extended in 1880, the Mess Room in its final form could seat some 2,000 men.
people
▪ A polished mahogany table, big enough to seat twenty people, ran down the middle of it.
▪ The restaurant seats 24, with three expansive rectangular marble tables each seating eight people.
▪ It was used for plays and mimes and seated about 5000 people.
▪ There was seating for hundreds of people, possibly thousands.
▪ Zeppelin may later produce a larger ship seating 40 people.
▪ Large dining space to seat 24 people.
room
▪ The Webster Room, which can seat around 60, is used for art exhibitions, talks, seminars and group meetings.
▪ The house has plenty of large rooms and places to seat a sizable banquet party.
▪ Beyond that was the locked door, and beyond that a small handsome dining room to seat eight.
▪ Quiet classical music wafts through the room, which can seat about 40 at an assortment of tables for two and four.
table
▪ It was full of long tables that seated from six and eight to a dozen or more.
▪ They dream of a great castle called Camelot and a round table that could seat 150 knights.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
back seat driver
be (sitting) in the catbird seat
be seated
▪ Helen was more than pleased to be seated beside Chris. She'd always wanted to meet him.
▪ Jan was seated near the door.
▪ John was seated on my left.
▪ Please be seated so we can start the meeting.
▪ The meal cannot start until everyone is seated.
▪ Example 3: Four girls were seated round a table, each writing individually.
▪ Once she was seated, he put his arms around her, cradling her fair head against his chest.
▪ Once the men are seated in the living room off the inside patio, they try to lure the children into conversation.
▪ She bade Demeter be seated and herself offered her honey-sweet wine, but the goddess would not taste it.
▪ She was seated on the Woolpack which was tied like a saddle to her Grey Horse.
▪ The other night, Deena was seated at a well-known, busy place near the Potomac River.
▪ They were seated on the far side, some in chairs, some leaning on the desk.
▪ To / two / too: There were two too many to be seated, too.
get/put bums on seats
▪ When you can put bums on seats, then you can come and tell me what flights you want to travel on.
in the hot seat
▪ City player-manager Peter Reid, still a rookie in the hot seat, has done a fine job since replacing Howard Kendall.
▪ He was in the hot seat for more than three hours.
▪ Put them in the hot seat and question then to find out.
▪ This will help the person in the hot seat to become more relaxed and confident in the role of the character.
▪ Tips Always address the person in the hot seat by the name of the character you have chosen.
▪ We can put Ant in the hot seat to find out.
▪ Wilkinson and Manion will be in the hot seat.
marginal seat/constituency
▪ Another factor not taken into account before the election was the number of expatriate Tory voters registered in marginal constituencies.
▪ Hand in hand with this measure goes an equally bold re-focusing of Labour's strategy concerning marginal constituencies.
▪ In the 1979 and 1983 elections there were examples of locally popular candidates holding their marginal seats against the national swing.
▪ Mr Devlin's constituency was a marginal seat before Parliament was dissolved last week, having a majority of 774.
▪ One of the country's two most marginal seats, Brecon and Radnor, also declares today.
▪ She said Darlington had been chosen because it was a marginal constituency.
▪ The Prime Minister rounded off his campaign by visiting two Tory marginal seats in south London.
▪ There is a core vote-a traditional solid Labour support-in every constituency in the land, including marginal seats.
on the edge of your seat
▪ The movie's last scenes kept us on the edge of our seats.
▪ Chesarynth perched on the edge of her seat, fearing a poisoned needle in the cushions.
▪ From the moment he took the rostrum, Gergiev had his musicians tensely perched on the edge of their seats.
▪ He was waiting for her answer, not exactly on the edge of his seat, though.
▪ This dramatic opening had me on the edge of my seat!
▪ This keeps you on the edge of your seat.
▪ We're on the edge of our seats.
orchestra section/seats
ringside seat
▪ It was the first advertised air tour and the price included a ringside seat and hotel accommodation.
▪ Meg had a ringside seat to research her latest role as a tough boxing coach.
▪ They were given ringside seats because of their devotion to Keiko.
▪ You've got a ringside seat.
take a back seat
▪ Women have often been forced to take a back seat in society.
▪ And very generally, the interests of lenders in New York take a back seat to the interests of the corporate borrowers.
▪ But when they were introduced, everything upstairs had to take a back seat.
▪ He notes, however, that economic considerations are taking a back seat to budget negotiations.
▪ If you can't agree to disagree, then take a back seat and let others have their way on this occasion.
▪ It was also a year when investment bankers took a back seat.
▪ Many feel reluctant to take a back seat and allow their children to enjoy the special attractiveness of the teens and twenties.
▪ Mr Peters has now taken a back seat.
▪ That her family had taken a back seat in her life.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ The arena seats 30,000.
▪ The auditorium seats 500 people.
▪ The Boeing 747 seats 400-425 passengers.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ After she seated herself at our table, other writers came by and, pulling chairs over, sat down.
▪ North Carolina Motor Speedway seated 48,000 until it was expanded to about 60,000 seats in 1998.
▪ Parents are encouraged to ensure that the child is seated safely and comfortably.
▪ She seated herself at the desk, relocated a floral display and smiled as the first patient walked into the room.
▪ The Captain was seated with his back to the door.
▪ There were reports of fans waiting in line as early as 6 a. m. Saturday to inquire about season seats.
Wikipedia

Seat (Buttermere)

Seat or Seat (Buttermere) is a minor Fell in the English Lake District. It has a height of 561 m (1840 ft). Seat is over-shadowed by Haystacks and High Crag. Its location is on the south-western corner of Buttermere in the North Western Fells.

SEAT

SEAT, S.A. (, Sociedad Española de Automóviles de Turismo) is a Spanish automobile manufacturer with its head office in Martorell, Spain. It was founded on May 9, 1950, by the Instituto Nacional de Industria (INI), a state-owned industrial holding company.

It is currently a wholly owned subsidiary of the German Volkswagen Group.

The headquarters of SEAT, S.A. is located at SEAT's industrial complex in Martorell near Barcelona, Spain . By 2000 annual production peaked at over 500,000 units; in total up to 2006, over 16 million cars have been produced including more than 6 million from the Martorell plant, with three-quarters of the annual production being exported to over seventy countries worldwide.

Seat (legal entity)

In legal English, the seat of a corporation or organisation, as a legal entity, is the location of its headquarters. Decision T 1012/03 of December 1, 2006 of the Boards of Appeal of the European Patent Office, Reasons 27. According to international and national procedural law, "specific legal actions with legal effect for and against the legal entity can be performed at the seat of this entity." However, "the term "seat" is sometimes also used in a broad sense without a specific legal meaning. In this case [it] only defines where an entity is located and does not mean that this location is a legal seat where specific juridical acts can be performed."

Seat (territorial-administrative unit)

Seats were administrative territorial entities in the medieval Kingdom of Hungary. The seats were autonomous regions within the Kingdom, and were independent from the feudal county system. Their autonomy was granted in return for the military services they provided to the Hungarian Kings.

The following divisions were at one point Székely seats:

  • Marosszék
  • Udvarhelyszék
  • Csíkszék
  • Gyergyószék
  • Bardóc-Miklósvárszék
  • Sepsiszék
  • Orbaiszék
  • Kézdiszék
  • Aranyosszék

Seats were formed by the:

  • Székelys
  • Transylvanian Saxons
  • Kumans
  • Jassic people
  • the Ten Lance Bearers

Most seats gave up their autonomous status and military traditions in late medieval times and paid tax instead.

Category:Medieval Kingdom of Hungary Category:Types of country subdivisions

Seat (disambiguation)

Seat can refer to:

A place to sit, (a " seat"), particularly the area one sits upon (rather than other elements, like armrests). It derives from Middle English sete and from Old Norse sæti.

See:

  • Chair
  • Car seat
  • Infant car seat, for children in a car
  • Airline seat
  • Ejection seat, rescue seat in an aircraft
  • Jump seat, auxiliary seat in a vehicle
  • Left seat, pilot in command's seat
  • Right seat, co-pilot's seat
  • Saddle, a type of seat used on the backs of animals, bicycles (see bicycle seat), etc.
  • Buttocks, the part of the body on which one sits

A place or office of authority:

This meaning derives from the Latin word situs, a place.

  • Chair (official), a seat of office, authority, or dignity
    • the family seat of a noble family, sometimes referred to as an ancestral seat.
    • the Cathedra of a bishop
  • Legislative seat, a membership in a parliament or other legislature
  • Seat (legal entity), indicating where the headquarters of the entity are located
  • An administrative centre, the capital city of an administrative region, such as:
    • County seat
    • Canton seat
    • Clan seat
  • Country seat, a place in the country
  • Throne, the original seat of authority from which others may be derived
  • Seat (territorial-administrative unit) territorial-administrative unit in the medieval Hungarian Kingdom
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Seat

Seat \Seat\ (s[=e]t), n. [OE. sete, Icel. s[ae]ti; akin to Sw. s["a]te, Dan. s[ae]de, MHG. s[=a]ze, AS. set, setl, and E. sit. [root]154. See Sit, and cf. Settle, n.]

  1. The place or thing upon which one sits; hence; anything made to be sat in or upon, as a chair, bench, stool, saddle, or the like.

    And Jesus . . . overthrew the tables of the money changers, and the seats of them that sold doves.
    --Matt. xxi. 1

  2. 2. The place occupied by anything, or where any person or thing is situated, resides, or abides; a site; an abode, a station; a post; a situation.

    Where thou dwellest, even where Satan's seat is.
    --Rev. ii. 1

  3. He that builds a fair house upon an ill seat committeth himself to prison.
    --Bacon.

    A seat of plenty, content, and tranquillity.
    --Macaulay.

    3. That part of a thing on which a person sits; as, the seat of a chair or saddle; the seat of a pair of pantaloons.

  4. A sitting; a right to sit; regular or appropriate place of sitting; as, a seat in a church; a seat for the season in the opera house.

  5. Posture, or way of sitting, on horseback.

    She had so good a seat and hand she might be trusted with any mount.
    --G. Eliot.

  6. (Mach.) A part or surface on which another part or surface rests; as, a valve seat.

    Seat worm (Zo["o]l.), the pinworm.

Seat

Seat \Seat\, v. i. To rest; to lie down. [Obs.]
--Spenser.

Seat

Seat \Seat\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Seated; p. pr. & vb. n. Seating.]

  1. To place on a seat; to cause to sit down; as, to seat one's self.

    The guests were no sooner seated but they entered into a warm debate.
    --Arbuthnot.

  2. To cause to occupy a post, site, situation, or the like; to station; to establish; to fix; to settle.

    Thus high . . . is King Richard seated.
    --Shak.

    They had seated themselves in New Guiana.
    --Sir W. Raleigh.

  3. To assign a seat to, or the seats of; to give a sitting to; as, to seat a church, or persons in a church.

  4. To fix; to set firm.

    From their foundations, loosening to and fro, They plucked the seated hills.
    --Milton.

  5. To settle; to plant with inhabitants; as to seat a country. [Obs.]
    --W. Stith.

  6. To put a seat or bottom in; as, to seat a chair.

WordNet

seat

  1. n. a space reserved for sitting (as in a theater or on a train or airplane); "he booked their seats in advance"; "he sat in someone else's place" [syn: place]

  2. the fleshy part of the human body that you sit on; "he deserves a good kick in the butt"; "are you going to sit on your fanny and do nothing?" [syn: buttocks, nates, arse, butt, backside, bum, buns, can, fundament, hindquarters, hind end, keister, posterior, prat, rear, rear end, rump, stern, tail, tail end, tooshie, tush, bottom, behind, derriere, fanny, ass]

  3. furniture that is designed for sitting on; "there were not enough seats for all the guests"

  4. any support where you can sit (especially the part of a chair or bench etc. on which you sit); "he dusted off the seat before sitting down"

  5. a center of authority (as a city from which authority is exercised)

  6. the cloth covering for the buttocks; "the seat of his pants was worn through"

seat

  1. v. show to a seat; assign a seat for; "The host seated me next to Mrs. Smith" [syn: sit, sit down]

  2. be able to seat; "The theater seats 2,000"

  3. place ceremoniously or formally in an office or position; "there was a ceremony to induct the president of the Academy" [syn: induct, invest]

  4. put a seat on a chair

  5. provide with seats; "seat a concert hall"

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

seat

"thing to sit on; act of sitting," c.1200, from Old Norse sæti "seat, position," from Proto-Germanic *sæt- (cognates: Old High German saze, Middle Dutch gesaete "seat," Old High German gisazi, German Gesäß "buttocks"), from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit" (see sit). Meaning "posterior of the body" (the sitting part) is from c.1600; sense of "part of a garment which covers the buttocks" is from 1835. Seat belt is from 1915, originally in airplanes.

seat

"residence, abode, established place," late 13c., extended use of seat (n.1), influenced by Old French siege "seat, established place," and Latin sedes "seat." Meaning "city in which a government sits" is attested from c.1400. Sense of "right of taking a place in a parliament or other legislative body" is attested from 1774. Old English had sæt "place where one sits in ambush," which also meant "residents, inhabitants," and is the source of the -set in Dorset and Somerset.

seat

1570s, "to be in a certain position" (implied in seated), from seat (n.2). Of diseases, in the body, from 1610s (hence deep-seated). Meaning "to cause to sit in a seat" is from 1610s, from seat (n.1). Related: Seated; seating.

Wiktionary

seat

n. 1 Something to be sat upon. 2 # A place in which to sit. vb. (context transitive English) To put an object into a place where it will rest; to fix; to set firm.

Gazetteer

Usage examples of "seat".

Beside the cushion was a vacant throne, radiant as morning in the East, ablaze with devices in gold and gems, a seat to fill the meanest soul with sensations of majesty and tempt dervishes to the sitting posture.

He saw one young Abies girl, then another, seated side by side on the floor, in the shadows between the wooden end-legs of a broad workbench and the far-left wall.

For instance, if your forward-facing chair is bolted to the floor and your compartment is being accelerated forward, you will feel the force of your seat on your back just as with the car described by Albert.

Take a seat, and tell me what there is to prevent you, when, in accepting my offer, you are sure to please M.

Godfrey without children, or on the future acquisition of a new seat at Cairo or Damascus.

Mr Steplight and I made a fine pair of travelling-companions, for he addressed no word to me nor even looked in my direction during all the first stage so that I might have been a parcel he had shoved onto the seat beside him.

Terrace Watson was seated behind his desk in the inner office, surrounded by file cabinets, an addressograph machine, a postage meter, a voice typer, and a computer with memory storage.

He arose from the oaken bench on which he was seated in the chapel, and wished, as the priest had done, to go and bid a last adieu to the double grave which contained his two lost friends.

As it passed in front of the lighted admin office, he caught a glimpse of two military policemen in the front seat, and one individual in the backseat.

Now it was a poster on the wall, an admonition to wear seat belts, that demanded her unwavering gaze.

He was thinking of something so widely different, being seated, in fact, just opposite to Sara, who, fresh from her afternoon sleep, was looking adorably pensive in her black dress edged with a soft white frill that took a heart-shaped curve in front, just wide enough to show the exquisite hollow in the lower part of her throat.

American bicycle-builders had surpassed the Royal Aeronautical Society, because they flew their crafts themselves, lying prone in their own creations, flying, as it was noted, by the seat of their pants.

The millionaire smiled affably at this pleasantry and invited his guest to be seated.

Or it was perhaps a beggar who came to him on the old yellow marble seat under the orange trees, and chatted affably about his business as being bad in these times of war.

The male Relidose stood silently afrown, seeing, perhaps for the first time, the madness which filled the male called High Seat.