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Sämi

Sämi is a village in Sõmeru Parish, Lääne-Viru County, in northeastern Estonia. It is located on the Tallinn– Narva highway ( E20), about east of the town of Rakvere. Sämi has a population of 59 (as of 1 January 2010).

Sami (name)

Sami or Sammy (, , ) is a given name and surname of different origins and meanings, most prevalent in the Arab world and Scandinavia. When spelled in English, it can be spelled as Sammy and often mistakenly confused as the abbreviated English name Sammy.

Sami or Sammy can be an Arabic name meaning "elevated" (الرفعة) or "sublime" (السُّمُوّ), or a Turkish name, a Finnish male name derived from Samuel, or an American name abbreviated from Samantha or Samuel.

When used outside of English speaking countries – specifically amongst non-native Arabic speakers – the name Sammy or Sami is mistakenly confused with Samee (Arabic for 'one who hears') or Samir (another Arabic name altogether). However, it is in fact an unabbreviated Arabic name derived from the verb saamaa (ساما) and yasmo (يسمو) which means to transcend. This is from the root samaa (سما,سمو) which means to be high, elevated, eminent, prominent.

The feminine version of this name in Arabic is Samiya or Samia (سامِيَة).

Sami (ancient city)

Sami , also referred to as Samia , Arini , or Makistos was a city in Ancient Greece. It was located in the Elis region, in western Peloponnese. The archaeological site consists of the remains of Sami's fortified citadel which dates to the Archaic period. It is situated on the slopes of the Lapithas mountain and faces the coast of the Ionian sea and also the plain of the Kato Samiko area.

Sami (poet)

Chainrai Bachomal Dattaramani Sami (1743-1850) was a distinguished poet who merged the Vedic wisdom in his Sindhi Shlokas in Beit form.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

Sami

native name for "Lapp," 1797, from the Lapp self-designation; of uncertain origin.

Usage examples of "sami".

The tempers of Horseclansmen were ever quick, but before either Djeri or Bili could free his blade, Chief Sami of Kahrtuh placed himself between them.

Bili aimed a wicked diagonal slash at Sami, who leaped back fumbling for his own hilt, and the heavy blade struck sparks from the polished floor, the well-tempered steel ringing like a bell.

No man, unfamiliar with the life-long fighting-trim of the Horseclansmen, would have believed that men of the ages of Chiefs Sami and Djeri could have moved so fast.

My dear sonsDjeri Hahfmun, Sami Kahrtuh, Bili Esmitheach of you is well proven a brave and honorable man, otherwise you would not be chiefs, your birth notwithstanding.

Aldora rode to her adoptive brother, Sami Hwahlis, who was herd-master-of-the-day, and explained her promise to the hungry thought-source.

With a wolfish grin, Chief Djeri drew both saber and dirk and, in the twinkling of an eye, Sami of Kahrtuh, Bili of Esmith, and Chuk of Djahnsun had their own steel out and were ranged beside him.

It is hard to recall after so long, but I believe Thoheeks Sami of Vawn, grandfather of the recently deceased Thoheeks Vawn, had a copy made to add to his large collection of books and writings.

Thoheeks Sami was a real scholar for his generation, with a penchant for collecting books on all aspects of warfare.