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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

rough

I.adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a rough calculation (=not very detailed or exact)
▪ I made a few rough calculations of how much it would cost.
a rough count (=not exact)
▪ I made a rough count of the houses in the street.
a rough draft (=not the finished form)
▪ Could you let me see a rough draft of your report?
a rough guess (=one that is not exact)
▪ This is just a rough guess, but I think it would cost about $50.
a rough outline (=one that has no details and that might change)
▪ Thompson gave me a rough outline of what had happened at the previous meeting.
a rough/approximate estimate (=not exact)
▪ Can you give me a rough estimate of how much the repairs will cost?
a rough/crude approximation (=one that is not very exact)
▪ Could you give us a rough approximation of the cost?
a rough/free translation (=one that is not very exact)
▪ It’s a rough translation but I think the meaning is clear.
an approximate/rough figure
▪ He gave us an approximate figure for the cost of the repairs.
diamond in the rough
hard/rough/slow etc going
▪ I’m getting the work done, but it’s slow going.
live roughBritish English (= live outside because of having no home)
▪ I ran away from home and lived rough for nine months.
rough and tumble
▪ the rough and tumble of public life
rough country (=difficult to travel over)
▪ a vehicle especially designed for rough country
rough diamond
rough guide
▪ The figures are only a rough guide.
rough paper
rough sketch
▪ Cantor drew a rough sketch of his apartment on a napkin.
rough (=with big waves)
▪ The sea was too rough to swim in.
rough (=not smooth or soft)
▪ The skin on his hands was rough and dry.
rough
▪ I reached out and touched the rough surface of the stone wall.
rough
▪ She felt the rough texture of his beard against her cheek.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
approximation
▪ For a long time, this was sufficient justification for Friedmann's assumption - as a rough approximation to the real universe.
▪ But as a very rough approximation, avoiding pain and courting pleasure is indeed the way we act.
▪ Neither could these illustrations just be rough approximations of the finished articles.
▪ However, by making some assumptions, a rough approximation of public expenditure saving can be reached.
cut
▪ Down on the bottom floor the timber for Yamaha's ever-increasing range of electric guitars is rough cut and then smooth finished.
day
▪ For quite a lot of people the last day of October was going to be a very rough day indeed.
▪ It is easy to forget exactly how much allowance should be made for the wind and other factors on a rough day.
diamond
▪ Keep your rough diamonds, your kaleidoscope, your mission, your connectors and your propaganda peddler-routing revolution.
draft
▪ Could it really be the first rough draft of a Euro-constitution?
▪ Tanedo works individually with students, helping them brainstorm and write rough drafts.
▪ She cobbled together a rough draft and then rewrote it, trying to remove the more ostentatious signs of plagiarism.
▪ For a while the conditions are so propitious that by spring break I have a rough draft of my book.
▪ One approach to the hypertext-to-text coherence problem is a labor-intensive one and treats the hypertext form as a rough draft.
▪ He kept a journal now, one filled with assignments from Speech and Psychology and Math and various rough drafts for me.
edge
▪ Although he sometimes rounded the rough edges off the truth, he remained an amusing raconteur and lively company.
▪ They were the pioneers willing to accept the rough edges of life on the technological frontier.
▪ Unpredictable, emotional and alive, it is, in keeping with the area, soul with the rough edges intact.
▪ But the Florentine School had not polished away her rough edges.
▪ Too much pressure, and you get a rough edge.
▪ He managed to smooth away his rougher edges.
▪ As with Brian, and I hope myself, Terry worked on these areas to try and even off the rough edges.
▪ Early rough edges refined in the studio and the power never drags.
estimate
▪ Calculate a rough estimate of interest at 1 percent per month.
▪ One in 5,000 is a rough estimate.
▪ You should be able to give a rough estimate of how much work each stage of the case is likely to entail.
▪ As a rough estimate, the average number of records required per title is 5.
▪ A rough estimate of the current amount of housebuilding in towns of over 50,000 population is around 15 percent.
▪ It seems worthwhile to attempt such a semi-quantitative approach if only to give rough estimates of the parameters involved.
▪ At a rough estimate 50 percent can write a few words, 50 percent can not.
grass
▪ Now they were stumbling into the front row of people, on to rough grass.
▪ Dougal stepped softly over the rough grass towards the gazebo.
▪ The road, which was narrow, was separated from a low cliff by a stretch of rough grass.
▪ Chill softness brushed his back as he slid into the rough grass.
▪ Good for utility lawns and keeping rough grass under control.
▪ I thrust into rough grass and smoothly penetrated your loamy depths.
grazing
▪ In the past, waste was not useless, but provided fuel, building materials and industrial materials, as well as rough grazing.
▪ She had needed nothing but some rough grazing, a few wells and the hospitality of the bedu to get her across.
▪ High percentage of farm land or all land in permanent pasture made up of rough grazing.
ground
▪ Felipe de Santis sat at the wheel, his eyes dark and irritated as he approached at speed over the rough ground.
▪ I was nervous about hitting the tail rotor on the rough ground.
▪ Picking her way over the rough ground and through the hazards, she gained the kitchen entrance.
▪ Handling a long-wheelbase Land-Rover with its trailer over rough ground is an art that needs plenty of practice.
▪ It is important to dress comfortably, with shoes that are suitable for walking over fairly rough ground.
▪ Then they were driving over rough ground, loose stones popping under the tyres.
▪ The specimen is believed to be a rough ground record for the south west.
▪ This helps to prevent the glider from bouncing on any rough ground.
guess
▪ At the side put down a rough guess of the cost that might be involved.
▪ At a rough guess, Pierremont Gardens today stands where the real gardens of Pierremont used to be.
guide
▪ We assume to start with that the weighted patterns provide a rough guide to playing the game.
▪ Charges differ throughout the country but 40p per cubic metre is a rough guide.
▪ However, as a rough guide, it feels slightly more Gibson-like than it does Fenderish, if that helps.
▪ Although individuals vary a great deal, a very rough guide is that the liver removes one unit of alcohol each hour.
▪ The latter is calibrated in centimetres, but most people will probably only use the rod as a rough guide.
▪ As a rough guide, first scrub or wash, peel and slice them.
▪ Charts, then, are only a rough guide to ideal weight.
hand
▪ Joe stared down at the large, rough hand gently rubbing against him.
▪ Looking down, she saw an oilcloth suit and rough hands.
▪ His rough hand had dirt under the nails.
▪ She felt his big rough hand running along her body outside her new dress.
idea
▪ And to give a rough idea of where the group makes its money, she cited breakdown of turnover by geographic area.
▪ This chart, from an Intelrun benchmark called Spec95, gives a rough idea of how the two chip families stack up.
▪ This comment depends upon having some rough idea what would count as racial discrimination.
▪ I had a rough idea from the photograph where the site was, but on the ground everything looked different.
▪ His wife gave me a rough idea of what their insurance situation was.
▪ Now you have a rough idea of your foot type, what do you look for?
justice
▪ For that he was put to death and there was, in one respect, a rough justice about it.
▪ So there was rough justice in the world.
▪ On the other hand this meted out only a very rough justice to owners.
▪ Exiled by Bolcarro to that judicial Siberia, Judge Lyttle applied his own rough justice.
▪ Here rappers become vigilantes or revolutionaries: machines for dispensing rough justice or revenge.
▪ Perhaps this was rough justice for my having ridden that one mile on the workmen's lorry on the sixth day.
▪ But the appetite for rough justice which the gun-toting sheriff satisfied does not easily go away.
▪ As it happens, there'd be a certain rough justice if I got a wage from it.
night
▪ Sounds as if he had a rough night trying to keep pace with his hosts, poor fellow!
▪ They had a rough night last night.
outline
▪ I have not been able to do more than suggest the rough outline of this approach.
▪ As the rough outlines of other cult members' lives began to take shape, I recognized them, too.
▪ We started the first rough outline of a scenario.
▪ So in the rest of this introductory chapter I will give a rough outline of all that we did, and why.
▪ So, if you can, plan ahead in rough outline.
paper
▪ I'd say you're looking for a business where they have a heavy demand for rough paper.
▪ On rough paper, cliches and clumsy constructions are allowed and then debated.
▪ Cheap envelopes of rough paper, one blue, one greeny-grey.
passage
▪ To get there would be a rough passage, and the return tortuous.
▪ It was like coming to harbour after a rough passage - with an armful of comfort to hand.
pasture
▪ For years he had refused, as it would have upset his hens in their rough pasture.
▪ At the moment it looks more like a bit of rough pasture ... full of dandelions and clover patches.
▪ The separation is at its most apparent in the summer, when the males feed on rougher pastures higher up the mountain.
▪ The changes were largely at the expense of moorland, heath and rough pasture.
patch
▪ She had been a major influence in my life, and helped me through the rough patches.
▪ The Royal Family is certainly going through a rough patch.
▪ It fills in rough patches on the cuticle and give a light-reflecting finish.
▪ When the company I work for went through a rough patch, there were no pay rises for two years.
▪ My boyfriend and I were going through a very rough patch at the time.
play
▪ That was also rough play and he should have been punished sternly.
ride
▪ Goodwin's letter was given a predictably rough ride by the liberationist press.
▪ But history says Bill Clinton may be in for a rough ride.
▪ Well, it's turned out not so badly, he thought, although it's been a rough ride.
▪ Even after the Renaissance and the rebirth of learning had reached these shores ears were still having a rough ride.
▪ He felt cold, his arms and legs aching from the rough ride of the previous day.
▪ He cheered Tory backbenchers, but they predicted that the Chancellor could also face a rough ride unless the plan works.
▪ Any member on a committee to which Karl Barth belonged had a rough ride.
road
▪ It's far from fast and there is some body shake over very rough roads.
▪ We drove for a few miles on the main road to Perth, and then turned on to a smaller, rougher road.
▪ From the chapel follow the rough road east, then north.
▪ The information highway is a rough road at best.
▪ The roughest road they will likely encounter is a parking lot studded with speed bumps.
sea
▪ Unfortunately, the London's pilot was fatally wounded, but his co-pilot managed to alight in a very rough sea.
▪ The equity department weathered not only rough seas but rejection as well.
▪ A free country in a free world is always at risk from high winds and rough seas.
▪ He sat at an ordinary table, to which the plates were clipped, as aboard ship in a rough sea.
▪ But the yacht would be a pounding hell if caught out in a rough sea.
▪ Sebastian Cermeno, went down in rough seas in 1595, along with at least seven sailors.
▪ It took a bishop called Wilfred, who was driven on to the Sussex coast by rough seas, to make the breakthrough.
▪ Dawn revealed that the rough seas had once again snapped the hogging trusses which sagged pitifully on each side of the raft.
sketch
▪ Also, try to make a very rough sketch of the rooms on each floor.
▪ Make a rough sketch of a parachute on the board.
▪ Draw a rough sketch and then translate them all in a permanent fashion to the wall.
▪ Cantor picked up his paper napkin and drew a rough sketch of a cell membrane.
▪ She sighed again and sorted through the rough sketches.
▪ Yoyo studied the rough sketch a moment.
▪ I enclose details of how to find the school and a rough sketch map showing the route from the A6.
spot
▪ Remember when Wilkinson hit that rough spot in the board meeting?
▪ Lewis talks to her, fills in the rough spots.
stone
▪ Then he lifted his other foot from the ground and set it firmly on the rough stone surface too.
▪ There are rough stone floors everywhere.
▪ Huge rough stones stood on the hard ground.
▪ There were no walls, just rough stones the size of dinner-plates marking each grave.
▪ It's impossible! she exclaimed to herself, getting up and leaning on the rough stone windowsill.
▪ Clapper or rough stone bridges are also a familiar part of the Dartmoor scenery.
▪ They pulled themselves to the top of the wall, sat there on the rough stone, shivering.
▪ She watched him clatter over the rough stones and station himself in the shadows beside the entrance.
stuff
▪ There's no rough stuff from the police - nothing you could file a complaint about - just an unexpected public display.
▪ I wait for the rough stuff.
▪ I nursed my damaged finger, and showed it to anyone who wanted me to join in the rough stuff.
▪ A great route, but strictly for lovers of full body contact and a bit of the rough stuff.
▪ A spot of rough stuff in the night; that's all they expected.
▪ But she might still be a hindrance when it came to the rough stuff.
▪ It should out-point them on the rough stuff, too, for the Range Rover is still king of the wild frontiers.
surface
▪ She stumbled on the rough surface and Roman slid his arm round her waist, holding her against him.
▪ I ran my tongue over its rough surface and felt its salty effervescence.
▪ The fabric may be textured to give it a rougher surface, resembling canvas.
▪ When reflected from a rough surface, singly and doubly reflected waves intermingle, and the signal is depolarized.
▪ You can ring the changes by exposing the aggregate and creating a rough surface texture if you find a smooth finish uninspiring.
▪ Between our mangled bodies and the rough surface of the board floor there was a thin rubber blanket.
▪ You can verify that for yourself by running your fingertips ova a slightly rough surface and then stopping.
▪ Coat each hair with a fine translucent film which smooths down the rough surface &038; seals the hair to prevent moisture loss.
terrain
▪ It's a new mobility aid designed to help blind people cover rough terrain.
▪ Otis flew over the column, dropping flares to help the nearly blind tanks and APCs navigate the rough terrain.
▪ The three person team was the first to cover 30 miles of rough terrain over two days.
▪ Specially out-fitted bulldozers, called Rome Plows, also flattened huge areas of rough terrain.
▪ So the question of her taking a five-mile hike across what in parts was sometimes rough terrain would never have occurred.
▪ Several times, sweeps through rough terrain, which had previously yielded nothing, resulted in the discovery of enemy units.
▪ At the top of the rise, in rougher terrain, the scenery improves dramatically as Gruinard Bay is suddenly revealed ahead.
▪ Off road means parkland and rough terrain.
texture
▪ I used the smoother side of the paper as I find a definite, rough texture rather intrusive.
▪ The heel of one of them might massage his arm or the rough texture of his cheek.
▪ The hairs have overlapping scales, which gives them a rough texture and increases the friction between goat and snow.
▪ The rough texture of the coat helps to protect it in undergrowth.
time
▪ This type of loving commitment can bring a marriage through the rough times and into full blossom again.
▪ She tries to recall the good memories to help smooth out the rough times.
▪ We're in for a rough time, Marcus.
▪ We were having a rough time just trying to pay the printer.
▪ You've been through rough times.
▪ She is having a rough time, too.
▪ The teachers gave me a rough time for a couple of years because my student and acting image didn't fit.
▪ After that, however, the law may have a rougher time.
track
▪ Situated on a high plain, behind Rennes-le-Chateau, La Valdieu was at the end of a very rough track.
▪ Once just a rough track, it is now passable and marked by little yellow arrows to show people the right direction.
▪ People would send cars up that rough track to Low Birk Hatt to make sure I travelled in style.
▪ Carry straight on up a rough track - this is the Minchmoor Road.
▪ Xerxes sent the Immortals, whose march-discipline on rough tracks in the dark might be equal to the task.
▪ After ¼ mile, at farm, continue uphill on obvious rough track to left of farm.
▪ Turn right and continue until you reach the buildings of Dykeheads and then take the rough track to the left.
▪ The car was closer, bumping heavily over the rough track.
treatment
▪ Especially with the rough treatment it was being subjected to.
▪ Pushchairs should be lightweight and compact, easy to fold and capable of withstanding rough treatment.
▪ The lock was not designed for rough treatment.
▪ Vinyl wallcoverings are always practical in halls since they will withstand all sorts of rough treatment.
▪ Ricardo Weibel was seized and brought to the base for 12 days of rough treatment, before being released and sent home.
▪ For all the rough treatment meted out to houses in institutional use, many retain remarkably fine interiors.
weather
▪ Our next reaction was fear that the invasion would not succeed because of the unusually rough weather.
▪ But this is no lagoon, and rough weather still has its effect.
▪ Prevents wet feet when working on the foredeck or on the lee rail in rough weather.
▪ Some doubted its ability to withstand rough weather.
▪ Fortunately, because they are diving birds, temporary submergence in rough weather is not going to trouble them.
▪ There was therefore an understandable reluctance to undertake regularly long voyages to windward in rough weather.
▪ We generally sleep right through the early morning if it's rough weather.
▪ We have suffered too much rough weather over the last few years to fall victim now to storms in the Cabinet.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a bad/difficult/sticky/rough patch
▪ Even when they knew he was going through a bad patch they would continue to deliver dangerous back-passes to him.
▪ Every team goes through a bad patch.
▪ Evode has gone through a sticky patch.
▪ Having hit a bad patch, financially, I decided I must try for some paid work with my knitting machine.
▪ Ruefully, she recalled her pleasure at the way the book, after a difficult patch, had begun to develop.
▪ Sometimes I am a real power pack of efficiency; then I hit a bad patch.
▪ Talk about hitting a bad patch.
▪ The Royal Family is certainly going through a rough patch.
a bit of rough
▪ At the moment it looks more like a bit of rough pasture ... full of dandelions and clover patches.
a rough/easy ride
▪ Any member on a committee to which Karl Barth belonged had a rough ride.
▪ But history says Bill Clinton may be in for a rough ride.
▪ Even after the Renaissance and the rebirth of learning had reached these shores ears were still having a rough ride.
▪ He cheered Tory backbenchers, but they predicted that the Chancellor could also face a rough ride unless the plan works.
▪ Well, it's turned out not so badly, he thought, although it's been a rough ride.
cut up rough
▪ But he can cut up rough and turn a bit nasty if he's got a mind to.
sleep rough
▪ A chap who had slept rough for more than 20 years was invited to offer ideas on how it should be run.
▪ And he's often had to sleep rough.
▪ As a result we have seen a sharp fall in the numbers who sleep rough on our streets.
▪ How long he'd been sleeping rough no one could tell.
▪ Many people in neighbouring buildings were also hurt as were a number of beggars sleeping rough on the pavement.
▪ Now it's in urgent need of blankets to lend to those forced to sleep rough.
▪ Others are left to wander or sleep rough.
▪ She lost precious belongings in her days of sleeping rough.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ "What are you doing in here?'' shouted the farmer in a rough voice.
rough mountain paths
▪ A rough gravel trail was the only way into town.
▪ Football's a rough sport.
▪ Fran was shaking her urgently, his voice rough with concern.
▪ Give us a rough idea of what you're trying to do.
▪ He fell, cutting his forehead on the rough edge of a rock.
▪ He gave us a rough outline of the course.
▪ Hessian cloth provides a rough homespun texture that was popular in the 1950s.
▪ His hands were big and rough.
▪ I'd say that the whole thing would cost you around $1000, but that's just a rough estimate.
▪ I've got a rough estimate here of what it might cost.
▪ I've had a rough day.
▪ I have not been able to do more than suggest the rough outline of this approach.
▪ It's just a rough draft, but I'd like you to read it and tell me what you think.
▪ It was a rough crossing and most of the passengers were seasick.
▪ Max grew up in a particularly rough part of Brooklyn.
▪ Photographs show the rough surface of the moon.
▪ Prices shown are only a rough guideline.
▪ She had a rough idea of where Harry lived, but she didn't know the exact street.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A rough hut, breadfruit, bananas, no one to talk to.
▪ Armagnac, rather like SuperBrat, is appealing because of its rough edges, its unpredictability.
▪ Here you meet the Garburn Road, a rough trackway which crosses over the pass.
▪ It is rough, he says, very bad.
▪ Most of the activities are routed through woodland and as some of the pathways can be rough outdoor footwear is recommended.
▪ The commonest are rough spar or aggregate finishes, and imitation brick and stonework; all can be painted if required.
▪ The stone scraped her legs, was rough against her hands.
▪ We were having a rough time just trying to pay the printer.
II.noun
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ friction caused by the roughness of the road surface
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Both are talented campaigners who are expert at mixing the rough and the smooth.
▪ His tee shot ended up in the rough and from there he could only slash the ball 50 yards over the green.
▪ Particularly helpful is the ability to produce slick roughs, illustrating an idea or a copy line.
▪ The roughs are weeded out until only the best remain.
III.verb
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a bad/difficult/sticky/rough patch
▪ Even when they knew he was going through a bad patch they would continue to deliver dangerous back-passes to him.
▪ Every team goes through a bad patch.
▪ Evode has gone through a sticky patch.
▪ Having hit a bad patch, financially, I decided I must try for some paid work with my knitting machine.
▪ Ruefully, she recalled her pleasure at the way the book, after a difficult patch, had begun to develop.
▪ Sometimes I am a real power pack of efficiency; then I hit a bad patch.
▪ Talk about hitting a bad patch.
▪ The Royal Family is certainly going through a rough patch.
a bit of rough
▪ At the moment it looks more like a bit of rough pasture ... full of dandelions and clover patches.
a rough/easy ride
▪ Any member on a committee to which Karl Barth belonged had a rough ride.
▪ But history says Bill Clinton may be in for a rough ride.
▪ Even after the Renaissance and the rebirth of learning had reached these shores ears were still having a rough ride.
▪ He cheered Tory backbenchers, but they predicted that the Chancellor could also face a rough ride unless the plan works.
▪ Well, it's turned out not so badly, he thought, although it's been a rough ride.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A television reporter was roughed up.
▪ As soon as they left, the agents went after them and roughed them up.
▪ By this time, Zigo had roughed up Flinn a bit, and she was afraid of him.
▪ Get Jim Bullinger past the first inning without getting too roughed up, and the Chicago Cubs pitcher is tough to beat.
▪ On the next play, Cal was flagged for roughing the passer.
▪ The rest of the animals had been roughed off and turned away in a distant paddock.
▪ Where they roughed out the areas they could cover, and possible sources of material.
IV.adverb
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ "Well, what are you waiting for? Get a move on!'' said the guard roughly.
▪ A man on the subway grabbed her roughly, asking for money.
▪ Write your experiment in rough then read it through carefully before finalizing it.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And even when the tires went flat or the road grew rough, we loved every minute of the journey.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Rough

Rough \Rough\, v. t.

  1. To render rough; to roughen.

  2. To break in, as a horse, especially for military purposes.
    --Crabb.

  3. To cut or make in a hasty, rough manner; -- with out; as, to rough out a carving, a sketch.

    Roughing rolls, rolls for reducing, in a rough manner, a bloom of iron to bars.

    To rough it, to endure hard conditions of living; to live without ordinary comforts.

Rough

Rough \Rough\, adv. In a rough manner; rudely; roughly.

Sleeping rough on the trenches, and dying stubbornly in their boats.
--Sir W. Scott.

Rough

Rough \Rough\, n.

  1. Boisterous weather. [Obs.]
    --Fletcher.

  2. A rude fellow; a coarse bully; a rowdy.

    In the rough, in an unwrought or rude condition; unpolished; as, a diamond or a sketch in the rough.

    Contemplating the people in the rough.
    --Mrs. Browning.

Rough

Rough \Rough\, a. [Compar. Rougher; superl. Roughest.] [OE. rou?, rou, row, rugh, ruh, AS. r?h; akin to LG. rug, D. rug, D. ruig, ruw, OHG. r?h, G. rauh, rauch; cf. Lith. raukas wrinkle, rukti to wrinkle. [root] 18. Cf. Rug, n.]

  1. Having inequalities, small ridges, or points, on the surface; not smooth or plain; as, a rough board; a rough stone; rough cloth. Specifically:

    1. Not level; having a broken surface; uneven; -- said of a piece of land, or of a road. ``Rough, uneven ways.''
      --Shak.

    2. Not polished; uncut; -- said of a gem; as, a rough diamond.

    3. Tossed in waves; boisterous; high; -- said of a sea or other piece of water.

      More unequal than the roughest sea.
      --T. Burnet.

    4. Marked by coarseness; shaggy; ragged; disordered; -- said of dress, appearance, or the like; as, a rough coat. ``A visage rough.''
      --Dryden. ``Roughsatyrs.''
      --Milton.

  2. Hence, figuratively, lacking refinement, gentleness, or polish. Specifically:

    1. Not courteous or kind; harsh; rude; uncivil; as, a rough temper.

      A fiend, a fury, pitiless and rough.
      --Shak.

      A surly boatman, rough as wayes or winds.
      --Prior.

    2. Marked by severity or violence; harsh; hard; as, rough measures or actions.

      On the rough edge of battle.
      --Milton.

      A quicker and rougher remedy.
      --Clarendon.

      Kind words prevent a good deal of that perverseness which rough and imperious usage often produces.
      --Locke.

    3. Loud and hoarse; offensive to the ear; harsh; grating; -- said of sound, voice, and the like; as, a rough tone; rough numbers.
      --Pope.

    4. Austere; harsh to the taste; as, rough wine.

    5. Tempestuous; boisterous; stormy; as, rough weather; a rough day.

      He stayeth his rough wind.
      --Isa. xxvii. 8.

      Time and the hour runs through the roughest day.
      --Shak.

    6. Hastily or carelessly done; wanting finish; incomplete; as, a rough estimate; a rough draught. Rough diamond, an uncut diamond; hence, colloquially, a person of intrinsic worth under a rude exterior. Rough and ready.

      1. Acting with offhand promptness and efficiency. ``The rough and ready understanding.''
        --Lowell.

      2. Produced offhand. ``Some rough and ready theory.''
        --Tylor.

WordNet

rough

  1. adv. with roughness or violence (`rough' is an informal variant for `roughly'); "he was pushed roughly aside"; "they treated him rough" [syn: roughly]

  2. with rough motion as over a rough surface; "ride rough" [syn: roughly]

rough

n. the part of a golf course bordering the fairway where the grass is not cut short

rough

v. prepare in preliminary or sketchy form [syn: rough in, rough out]

rough

  1. adj. having or caused by an irregular surface; "trees with rough bark"; "rough ground"; "a rough ride"; "rough skin"; "rough blankets"; "his unsmooth face"; "unsmooth writing" [syn: unsmooth] [ant: smooth]

  2. (of persons or behavior) lacking refinement or finesse; "she was a diamond in the rough"; "rough manners"

  3. not quite exact or correct; "the approximate time was 10 o'clock"; "a rough guess"; "a ballpark estimate" [syn: approximate, approximative]

  4. full of hardship or trials; "the rocky road to success"; "they were having a rough time" [syn: rocky]

  5. violently agitated and turbulent; "boisterous winds and waves"; "the fierce thunders roar me their music"- Ezra Pound; "rough weather"; "rough seas" [syn: boisterous, fierce]

  6. unpleasantly harsh or grating in sound; "a gravelly voice" [syn: grating, gravel, gravelly, rasping, raspy]

  7. ready and able to resort to force or violence; "pugnacious spirits...lamented that there was so little prospect of an exhilarating disturbance"- Herman Melville; "they were rough and determined fighting men" [syn: pugnacious]

  8. of the margin of a leaf shape; having the edge cut or fringed or scalloped [ant: smooth]

  9. not shaped by cutting or trimming; "an uncut diamond"; "rough gemstones" [syn: uncut] [ant: cut]

  10. not carefully or expertly made; "managed to make a crude splint"; "a crude cabin of logs with bark still on them"; "rough carpentry" [syn: crude]

  11. not perfected; "a rough draft"; "a few rough sketches"

  12. unpleasantly stern; "wild and harsh country full of hot sand and cactus"; "the nomad life is rough and hazardous" [syn: harsh]

Wikipedia

Rough (facility)

Rough is a natural gas storage facility situated off the east coast of England.

Rough

Rough may refer to:

  • Roughness
  • Rough (golf), the area outside the fairway on a golf course
  • Rough (manga)
  • Rough (facility), gas storage in England
  • Rough (album), released by Tina Turner in 1978
  • Rough (film), a 2013 film
  • Remi Rough, an English street artist

Rough (manga)

is a romantic comedy swimming manga by Mitsuru Adachi. It was published by Shogakukan in Weekly Shōnen Sunday from 1987 to 1989, and collected in 12 tankōbon volumes. The series was adapted into a live action film in 2006, released in Japan by Toho.

The story is about high school student Keisuke Yamato, a 100 m freestyle swimmer, and Ami Ninomiya, the diver he falls in love with. Their families own rival confectionery stores, and Ami hates Keisuke's family because she believes her grandfather was driven to an early death because of the Yamato "horned owl" manju, which outsold her family's owl manju because it had ears, making it larger.

Rough (album)

Rough is Tina Turner's third solo album, released in September 1978 on the EMI label in the UK, Ariola Records in West Germany and United Artists in the United States.

Rough (film)

Rough is a 2014 Telugu film directed by C. H. Subba Reddy. The movie is produced by M. Abilash on Sridevi Entertainments Banner while Aadi, Rakul Preet Singh and Srihari play pivotal roles. Mani Sharma composed the Music.Actor Srihari died before the film was released. The film received mixed reviews from critics and turned out to average hit at the box office.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

rough

c.1200, "broken ground," from rough (adj.). Meaning "a rowdy" is first attested 1837. Specific sense in golf is from 1901. Phrase in the rough "in an unfinished or unprocessed condition" (of timber, etc.) is from 1819.

rough

late 15c., from rough (adj.). Related: Roughed; roughing. Phrase rough it "submit to hardships" (1768) is originally nautical:\n\nTo lie rough; to lie all night in one's clothes: called also roughing it. Likewise to sleep on the bare deck of a ship, when the person is commonly advised to chuse the softest plank.

[Grose, "Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue," 1788]

\nTo rough out "shape or plan approximately" is from 1770. To rough up "make rough" is from 1763. To rough (someone) up "beat up, jostle violently" is from 1868. The U.S. football penalty roughing was originally a term from boxing (1866).

rough

Old English ruh "rough, coarse (of cloth); hairy, shaggy; untrimmed, uncultivated," from West Germanic *rukhwaz "shaggy, hairy, rough" (cognates: Middle Dutch ruuch, Dutch ruig, Old High German ruher, German rauh), from Proto-Germanic *rukhaz, from PIE *reue- (2) "to smash, knock down, tear out, dig up" (cognates: Sanskrit ruksah "rough;" Latin ruga "wrinkle," ruere "to rush, fall violently, collapse," ruina "a collapse;" Lithuanian raukas "wrinkle," rukti "to shrink").\n

\nThe original -gh- sound was guttural, as in Scottish loch. Sense of "approximate" is first recorded c.1600. Of places, "riotous, disorderly, characterized by violent action," 1863. Rough draft is from 1690s. Rough-and-ready is from 1810, originally military; rough-and-tumble (1810) is from a style of free-fighting.

Wiktionary

rough

  1. 1 Having a texture that has much friction. Not smooth; uneven. 2 approximate; hasty or careless; not finished. 3 turbulent. 4 difficult; trying. 5 crude; unrefined 6 violent; not careful or subtle 7 Loud and hoarse; offensive to the ear; harsh; grating. 8 Not polished; uncut; said of a gem. 9 Harsh-tasting. adv. In a rough manner; rudely; roughly. n. 1 The unmowed part of a golf course. 2 A rude fellow; a coarse bully; a rowdy. 3 (context cricket English) A scuffed and roughened area of the pitch, where the bowler's feet fall, used as a target by spin bowlers because of its unpredictable bounce. 4 The raw material from which faceted or cabochon gems are created. 5 A quick sketch, similar to a thumbnail, but larger and more detailed. Meant for artistic brainstorming and a vital step in the design process. 6 (context obsolete English) Boisterous weather. v

  2. 1 To create in an approximate form. 2 (context ice hockey English) To commit the offense of roughing, i.e. to punch another player. 3 To render rough; to roughen. 4 To break in (a horse, et

  3. ), especially for military purposes.

Gazetteer

Usage examples of "rough".

As she leaned against the wall of the house, the rough texture of the red brick gently abraded her bare shoulders.

The rough tips stroked, teased, and then he caught her abraded clit between two fingers.

The people hauled in to testify about why they voted absentee offered a vivid picture of the fierce loyalties, rough politics, and economic pressures that shaped the lives of Arkansas hill people.

Bay flattened herself against the rough adobe wall and held her hands out in front of her as he started walking toward her.

Walking through a wall in the pitch black, feeling the rough adobe as she made her way blindly down a secret passageway, was sensible?

Another two strides, and he almost tripped over Issgrillikk - his agemate, friend, and foster-cousin - twisted around himself in pain at the base of one of the Great Trees, his claws gouging up the rough, grey-brown bark and tearing long white streaks into the inner wood.

Issgrillikk - his agemate, friend, and foster-cousin - twisted around himself in pain at the base of one of the Great Trees, his claws gouging up the rough, grey-brown bark and tearing long white streaks into the inner wood.

When it was over and Thure and Bud again gave their attention to the court, Bill Ugger was about to continue with his testimony, the majority of the crowd having shown themselves so plainly in sympathy with the actions of the alcalde that the rougher ones evidently thought it wise to keep quiet.

Chained again in his corner of the drafry t Vcell, Alec turned his face to the rough stone wall and sobbed until his chest ached.

More locks, more tools, rough chunks of metal and wood, and a number of devices whose uses Alec could not guess were mixed indiscriminately among masks, carvings, musical instruments of all descriptions, animal skulls, dried plants, fine pottery, glittering crystals-there was no rhyme or reason apparent in the arrangement.

Gradually, Seregil introduced Alec to more clandestine procedures-a little innocent housebreaking, or making a game of evading the notice of the Harbor Watch in the rough byways of the Lower City.

Studying them in the red sunset light, Alec could see that they were hard-faced characters in rough traveling garb.

There is not simply an inquiry as to the value of classic culture, a certain jealousy of the schools where it is obtained, a rough popular contempt for the graces of learning, a failure to see any connection between the first aorist and the rolling of steel rails, but there is arising an angry protest against the conditions of a life which make one free of the serene heights of thought and give him range of all intellectual countries, and keep another at the spade and the loom, year after year, that he may earn food for the day and lodging for the night.

Their long-armed, apish forms seemed adapted to the rough going--the way was almost half steady climbing up, and down.

And yet I have seen a sprig of arbutus in rough and clumsy buttonholes on weather-faded lapels which, the rest of the twelve-month through, know no other flower.