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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

retire

verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a retired couple (=having finished working at the end of their working lives)
▪ The house is suitable for a retired couple.
a retired employee
▪ They are for an increase in pension payments to retired employees.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
before
Before retiring, they all squashed into one compartment to play charades.
▪ Fred Gustavson, who commanded submarines here before retiring the day after the Salt Lake City incident.
early
▪ Controversy has also surrounded the terms under which Mr McNeill and four other senior education officials have been able to retire early.
▪ Cosby portrays a blue-collar worker who was forced to retire early from an airline.
▪ Iris is totally dependent on Donald who retired early to care for his wife.
▪ Financial advisers warn consumers not to depend much on either their pensions or Social Security to help them retire early.
▪ He retired early in 1981 so he could nurse his wife Ruby, who was partially paralyzed with polio.
▪ Those with the longer periods received higher payments than those with shorter periods and were more likely to have retired early.
▪ People considering retiring early would be caught by that punitive tax.
▪ He was in his early fifties and couldn't be retired early, except on a very much reduced company pension.
now
▪ His father and Mr Tetlow's father, both over 70, can now retire.
▪ Forensic Anthropologist Walter Birkby, now retired, said the cause of death was almost certainly murder.
Now retired the art teacher as was is painting flat out full time whilst the other runs the distaff side.
▪ Selfredge, now retired, declined to be interviewed, and the Daily News was unable to locate any of the sailors.
▪ Which is a hard enough life for any man, and my old friend has retired now.
▪ They must now retire and decide whether he was guilty or not guilty of the charge.
Now retired, her memoirs Black Teacher is a classic of its kind.
recently
▪ He recently retired from his appointment as Lord Lieutenant of Staffordshire after 25 years.
▪ I thought about retiring recently when I found myself yelling during a game.
▪ Two members of our sales team have recently retired -, with 18 years service, and, with 20 years service.
▪ For many years he has presided over seminars in which recently retired politicians and civil servants are encouraged to share their secrets.
▪ Ulrich recently retired from the company and Lundwall lost his job last year after a downsizing.
▪ I recently retired at age 59, and my wife, a year younger, is retired as well.
■ NOUN
age
▪ He continued to box until 1914, when he retired at the age of fifty-two.
▪ She folded the Tightwad Gazette so she could retire at age 41.
▪ By the 1890s civil servants had become obliged to retire on reaching pensionable age.
▪ New York Jets wide receiver Al Toon retired in 1992 at age 29 after nine concussions.
▪ Gerald became so successful in farming and property that he was able to retire at the age of forty.
▪ I recently retired at age 59, and my wife, a year younger, is retired as well.
▪ It will be a matter for discussion as to whether all partners should retire at the same age or whether circumstances justify disparity.
▪ It was not unusual for men in the clandestine service to retire at age fifty-one.
army
▪ Even the middle-ranking provincial posts continued to attract humbler noblemen who often took them up after retiring from the army.
▪ She accompanied her husband, retired Army Maj.
▪ General Powell retires from the army this autumn.
▪ Now, detectives are investigating the possibility that a fourth woman may have been slain by the retired Army sergeant.
▪ In 1822 he retired from the army as captain on half pay.
▪ But the official, retired Army Gen.
▪ Clinton relied upon retired Army Gen.
▪ To stress the urgency for ratification, Clinton assembled a bipartisan coalition of supporters including Republicans such as retired Army Gen.
bed
▪ On hearing the story Lily had retired to bed with a headache leaving Stella to do the washing-up.
▪ Leaving her amour with strict instructions on how to find her, she retired to bed and waited.
▪ We retired to bed but I couldn't sleep.
▪ I retired late to bed, for as always the morning would arrive too soon.
▪ He had not retired to bed sober, but then he rarely, if ever, did.
▪ By the time I had made some late-night phone calls, the other athletes had long retired to their beds.
▪ Then 30 minutes back home again and about another four hours sitting around the house before retiring to bed.
▪ I decided I ought to be professional about this and also retire to my bed.
chairman
▪ Fred Walker, who still lives locally, will also retire as chairman.
▪ Mr Denny, 63 years old, is a retired vice chairman of Sears, Roebuck &038; Co.
decision
▪ The decision to retire is never an easy one for architects.
▪ His decision to retire came as a surprise.
▪ His decision to retire to Alderney with his third wife, Pat, was never easy.
▪ Ralston said his decision to retire after this season was something he had considered at the end of the last several seasons.
▪ In 1990, when Crayola announced its decision to retire eight colors, fans saw red.
▪ But there were other factors that weighed heavily in the decision to retire the Rotterdam.
director
▪ Finally, on November 24, he took over the reins of the Puzzle Palace from the retiring director.
▪ Peter Bibby has retired as deputy director of social services in Brent.
▪ He retired as general director of the Mission in 1902.
end
▪ He had told them that Whitlock would be promoted to Deputy Director when he retired at the end of the year.
▪ Nunn, who is retiring at the end of the year, and Specter did not explain their votes.
▪ Steward had announced he was retiring at the end of that season but his retirement happened earlier than anticipated.
▪ Nunn, who is retiring at the end of the year, explained his vote switch in a brief written statement.
▪ Stuart Ward has taken over from Bill Davidson who retired at the end of last year.
▪ Apparently Mr Tares retired at the end of last week.
force
▪ Mr Eynon retired from the force two months ago and so can't be disciplined.
▪ The Lawson brothers retired from the police force in January.
job
▪ She suffered serious brain damage and was retired from her job on medical grounds.
▪ By then he was retired from his job as an electronics technician for the government, and he was dying.
▪ He had also clocked up 34 years as a retained firefighter when he retired from that job two years ago.
▪ Marjorie aged 66, arranged to retire from her job a week before Tom.
officer
▪ Tell that to Huseyin Ertan, a retired naval officer who is the Bosporus's chief traffic cop.
▪ Last week, an opposing group of retired officers joined the battle on the side of the Pentagon.
pension
▪ A large number wish to continue working as long as they are fit and do not want to retire at the state pension age.
▪ Why else do we ensure that when they retire they receive subsistence-level pensions?
▪ Thank goodness, the current pensions policy is improving the position: many more people will retire with second pensions.
plan
▪ He has no immediate plans to retire, having reached a peak in his career.
▪ And he has no plans to retire.
▪ Hansford still plays at 70 and has no plans to retire.
▪ Like the defined contribution plan, therefore, the final benefit depends on what is in the plan when the employee retires.
▪ But I still have no plans to retire.
service
▪ CF-DRD was retired from service in 1984, but this was not to be the end of this particular Norseman's fame.
▪ The retired Internal Revenue Service employee paid $ 15, 500 for the two-bedroom mobile home on space 72.
▪ The college's head of training plans to retire after 30 years service.
▪ Finch, a retired National Park Service administrator, has been re searching Hunter since 1961.
▪ His father also worked there as a maintenance man, retiring after 51 years service.
▪ He retired from the Foreign Service in 1968.
▪ Héctor Jurado Toro who retired from active service.
▪ Alistair says goodbye Alistair Cairns, Supply Officer, has retired after 27 years service.
worker
▪ Abortion may be a deciding factor for Fred Chiorra, a 71-year old retired steel worker and Democrat from Allentown.
year
▪ Frank Walker retired two years ago after working for the South Tees Health authority for 23 years.
▪ Michael was going to retire that year.
▪ I am 63 years young and retired for one year.
▪ Her children had families of their own and her husband wasn't due to retire for several years.
▪ He then became assistant head coach under Ray Handley in 1991 after Parcells retired but a year later left for Pittsburgh.
▪ The college's head of training plans to retire after 30 years service.
years
▪ Mrs Hughes married after she retired 50 years later and her husband lived to be 103.
▪ I am a divorced 44-year-old woman, planning to retire in 12 years.
▪ The college's head of training plans to retire after 30 years service.
▪ Jimmy: They retired there a few years ago.
▪ Mrs Coyle was retiring after 17 years as manageress.
▪ In 1979, Courtney Pace retired after thirty-five years as a staff member for former senator James Eastland.
▪ He never played in a Test again and was to retire three years later.
▪ He retired a few years ago, but kept active at a lot of different things.
■ VERB
decide
▪ Who could take over if she decided to retire?
▪ The fifth, reserve offensive tackle Charles McRae, has decided to retire from football following a disappointing six-year career.
▪ It should be left to individuals to decide when to retire ....
▪ Q.. So how did you feel when he decided to retire from the Senate this year?
▪ Last month Putin decided to retire silo-housed intercontinental ballistic missiles as their service lives expire.
▪ He could still decide to retire.
▪ Farming businesses rationalise the labour force, or decide not to replace retiring staff.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
the retiring president/manager/director etc
▪ Finally, on November 24, he took over the reins of the Puzzle Palace from the retiring director.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ At 75, Stevens has no plans to retire.
▪ Everyone should have the right to a pension when they retire.
▪ He retired as Principal ten years ago, but still does a lot of fund-raising for the school.
▪ If you retire at 50, you won't get your full pension.
▪ In the UK, men usually retire in their late 50s or early 60s.
▪ Jim Rutland retired from the Navy last year.
▪ Mary Ellen always had to set the fire for the next morning before retiring to bed.
▪ Mrs Davies retired after 45 years with the company.
▪ My father retired at 65.
▪ The 49ers are planning to retire Montana's No. 16 jersey.
▪ The captain retired at ten o'clock with a glass of whisky.
▪ The jury has retired to consider its verdict.
▪ When Jean retired from modelling, she moved to Cornwall.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ He came back the following year only to retire once more during the exhibition season because of the resistance.
▪ Moser said the elder Carman was a retired union official.
▪ Preparing to write his great work of self-analysis and retrospection, Proust in effect retired from life.
▪ She too looks like a retired person, retired from the turbulence beyond the perimeter wall.
▪ The Director who retires by rotation is Mr F. Cox who, being eligible, offers himself for re-election.
▪ The Lawson brothers retired from the police force in January.
▪ Will, now approaching his seventies, wanted to retire but their savings were insufficient to allow him to do so.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Retire

Retire \Re*tire"\, n.

  1. The act of retiring, or the state of being retired; also, a place to which one retires. [Obs.]

    The battle and the retire of the English succors.
    --Bacon.

    [Eve] discover'd soon the place of her retire.
    --Milton.

  2. (Mil.) A call sounded on a bugle, announcing to skirmishers that they are to retire, or fall back.

Retire

Retire \Re*tire"\, v. i.

  1. To go back or return; to draw back or away; to keep aloof; to withdraw or retreat, as from observation; to go into privacy; as, to retire to his home; to retire from the world, or from notice.

    To Una back he cast him to retire.
    --Spenser.

    The mind contracts herself, and shrinketh in, And to herself she gladly doth retire.
    --Sir J. Davies.

  2. To retreat from action or danger; to withdraw for safety or pleasure; as, to retire from battle.

    Set Uriah in the forefront of the hottest battle, and retire ye from him, that he may be smitten, and die.
    --2 Sam. xi. 15.

  3. To withdraw from a public station, or from business; as, having made a large fortune, he retired.

    And from Britannia's public posts retire.
    --Addison.

  4. To recede; to fall or bend back; as, the shore of the sea retires in bays and gulfs.

  5. To go to bed; as, he usually retires early.

    Syn: To withdraw; leave; depart; secede; recede; retreat; retrocede.

Retire

Retire \Re*tire"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Retired; p. pr. & vb. n. Retiring.] [F. retirer; pref. re- re- + tirer to draw. See Tirade.]

  1. To withdraw; to take away; -- sometimes used reflexively.

    He . . . retired himself, his wife, and children into a forest.
    --Sir P. Sidney.

    As when the sun is present all the year, And never doth retire his golden ray.
    --Sir J. Davies.

  2. To withdraw from circulation, or from the market; to take up and pay; as, to retire bonds; to retire a note.

  3. To cause to retire; specifically, to designate as no longer qualified for active service; to place on the retired list; as, to retire a military or naval officer.

Wiktionary

retire

n. 1 (context rare English) The act of retiring, or the state of being retired; also, a place to which one retires. 2 (context dated English) A call sounded on a bugle, announcing to skirmishers that they are to retire, or fall back. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To withdraw; to take away; -- sometimes used reflexively. 2 (context transitive English) To withdraw from circulation, or from the market; to take up and pay; as, to retire bonds; to retire a note. 3 (context transitive English) To cause to retire; specifically, to designate as no longer qualified for active service; to place on the retired list; as, to retire a military or naval officer. 4 (context transitive cricket of a batsman English) to voluntarily stop batting before being dismissed so that the next batsman can bat 5 (context transitive baseball of a fielder English), to make a defensive play which results in a runner or the batter being put out 6 (context intransitive English) To go back or return; to draw back or away; to keep aloof; to withdraw or retreat, as from observation; to go into privacy; as, to retire to his home; to retire from the world, or from notice. 7 (context intransitive English) To retreat from action or danger; to withdraw for safety or pleasure; as, to retire from battle. 8 (context intransitive English) To withdraw from a public station, from working, or from business 9 (context intransitive English) To recede; to fall or bend back; as, the shore of the sea retires in bays and gulfs. 10 (context intransitive English) To go to bed; as, he usually retires early.

WordNet

retire

  1. v. go into retirement; stop performing one's work or withdraw from one's position; "He retired at age 68"

  2. withdraw from active participation; "He retired from chess" [syn: withdraw]

  3. pull back or move away or backward; "The enemy withdrew"; "The limo pulled away from the curb" [syn: withdraw, retreat, pull away, draw back, recede, pull back, move back]

  4. move back and away from; "The enemy fell back" [syn: recede, fall back] [ant: advance]

  5. withdraw from circulation or from the market, as of bills, shares, and bonds

  6. break from a meeting or gathering; "We adjourned for lunch"; "The men retired to the library" [syn: adjourn, withdraw]

  7. make (someone) retire; "The director was retired after the scandal"

  8. dispose of; as of old clothes; "She finally retired that old coat" [syn: pension off]

  9. lose interest; "he retired from life when his wife died" [syn: withdraw]

  10. cause to be out on a fielding play [syn: put out]

  11. cause to retire; "The pitcher retired three batters"; "the runner was put out at third base" [syn: strike out]

  12. go to bed in order to sleep; "I usually turn in at midnight"; "He turns out at the crack of dawn" [syn: go to bed, turn in, bed, crawl in, kip down, hit the hay, hit the sack, sack out, go to sleep] [ant: get up, get up]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

retire

1530s, of armies, "to retreat," from Middle French retirer "to withdraw (something)," from re- "back" (see re-) + Old French tirer "to draw" (see tirade). Related: Retired; retiring.\n

\nMeaning "to withdraw" to some place, especially for the sake of privacy, is recorded from 1530s; sense of "leave an occupation" first attested 1640s (implied in retirement). Meaning "to leave company and go to bed" is from 1660s. Transitive sense is from 1540s, originally "withdraw, lead back" (troops, etc.); meaning "to remove from active service" is from 1680s. Baseball sense of "to put out" is recorded from 1874.

Usage examples of "retire".

Louis Philippe found a home in England, at first at Claremont, and then in Abingdon House, Kensington, where he lived for some time in apparently tranquil enjoyment, the delightful and salubrious vicinity affording to his family means of retired and pleasurable recreation.

Aquileia and Padua fled before the invasion of Attila, and retired to the Isle of Gradus, and Rivus Altus, or Rialto.

When I entered the room, to my amazement I found that of the five directors only one was present besides myself, an honest old retired sea captain who had bought and paid for 300 shares.

The father reserved to himself a revenue of one hundred thousand pistoles per annum, retired to the castle of Chamberry, and espoused the countess dowager of St.

The persons against whom these measures were taken, being apprized of the impending danger, generally retired from their own habitations.

When she retired from the ring, kissing her little hands prettily to the applauding audience, the manager turned her horse again facing the curtain in the canvassed passageway.

In the summer, however, her majesty made a cruise in her yacht, before retiring to her autumnal Scottish retreat.

Someone suggested Ross Griffin, a retired ski-bum and lifelong mountain beatnik who was going half-straight at the time and talking about running for the City Council.

The two ladies had such an air of mysterious competence to the task they had undertaken that it seemed to Bernard that nothing was left to him but to retire into temporary exile.

Edgar, giving him the charge of his horse, earnestly besought him to retire in quiet, and to keep his opinions and experiments to himself.

Miss Bloomer retired to rest, or rather to bed, for during the night she was restless, tossing from side to side like one in delirium.

Two months before, Pete had retired the previous Bonkers to a small but well apportioned hutch out in his garage to live out the rest of his life in comfort.

Some rebel chiefs escaped in two French frigates, which had arrived on the coast of Lochaber about the end of April, and engaged three vessels belonging to his Britannic majesty, which they obliged to retire.

On the verge of rising to coax his charge to consider retiring to the comfort in an alehouse, Brith froze.

As soon as Bronden received the paper, the Ashanti retired to his post.