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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

rest

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a good rest
▪ You need a good rest.
a resting place (=a place where someone or something stays or is buried)
▪ This tomb is the last resting place of the Davison family.
be based on/rest on an assumption
▪ Our plans were based on the assumption that everyone would be willing to help.
deserve a rest/break/holiday etc
▪ Once the students have done their exams they deserve a break.
let the matter rest/drop (=stop discussing or worrying about something)
▪ I was too curious to let the matter drop.
rest area
rest home
rest room
rest stop
the rest of the world
▪ How will this affect Britain and the rest of the world?
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
day
▪ At that time Venturous was undergoing engine repairs and some of the crew were on rest days when the call came.
▪ Horst was suffering from a headache and needed a rest day.
▪ We can take a rest day when we like.
▪ The individual event starts here today with a rest day tomorrow.
▪ We ran back towards the Solent for a rest day at Southampton.
▪ It was an astonishing piece of planning, especially as the Friday, being Good Friday, was the rest day.
▪ We'd had our rest days, just three days work left.
▪ The only thing he was thankful for was that it was the eleventh day, the rest day.
■ VERB
let
▪ She rolled on top of him, letting her full weight rest on his body.
▪ When she sat down she didn't let herself rest against the back of the chair.
▪ He let his hammer rest on the shoe sole and looked up.
▪ He is also described as the quiet one who shuns publicity and lets the rest of the band enjoy the limelight.
▪ Anyway, you really should have just taken the useful tips from his lecture and let the rest slide.
▪ Knead 1 to 2 minutes. Let rest 10 minutes.
▪ Season buffalo steaks with salt and pepper to taste and let them rest for 1 hour at room temperature.
need
▪ You need rest and besides, I want you here with me anyway.
▪ Doctors tell him he needs a complete rest for six months.
▪ So respect, remembrance was for herself, and today herself needed rest.
▪ The hotel doctor says I need a rest.
▪ Economically, it did not need the rest of the world for anything.
▪ If people need a rest on the way what's wrong with sitting on the ground?
▪ That left him the resilience he needed to enjoy the rest of his life properly.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
... and the rest is history
▪ But then he started scribbling away at A Year in Provence and the rest is history.
▪ Dependence was imposed and the rest is history and green beans, cotton tee-shirts, patronage, and serfdom.
▪ He was initially hired by the Oxford Mail, then began to concentrate on sport, and the rest is history.
▪ Manufacturers responded by building cheaper modem hardware, and the rest is history.
▪ She noticed that he had a cute bum - and the rest is history.
▪ Then, when he was 17, he picked up a basketball, and the rest is history.
God rest his/her soul
God rest his/her soul
God rest his/her soul
lay sb to rest
▪ She was laid to rest next to her husband, who died in 1993.
▪ At nightfall she was tired and lay down to rest.
▪ Rather it attempted to lay the movement to rest.
▪ She took the pills and lay down to rest with her eyes closed.
▪ Then she lay down to rest in the lounge, surrounded by other women who even here never stopped talking.
▪ We can't even lay him to rest.
▪ Without proof I should really lay the idea to rest.
let sth drop/rest/lie
more ... than the rest/the others/everything else put together
rest in peace
▪ Ashamed of your old man, want the whole gruesome mess to rest in peace?
▪ But resting in peace is not always easy.
▪ But the pensioners won't let him rest in peace.
▪ For Tony, that he may rest in peace, and for his family for their strengthening and peace.
▪ He hopes to give relatives peace of mind while their loved ones rest in peace.
▪ He was buried in Auchinleck kirkyard but, even in death, he was not allowed to rest in peace.
▪ So much for the residents being allowed to rest in peace.
▪ They need to find the killers of Peter and Gwenda so they can rest in peace.
rest/breathe easy
▪ Craig Chalmers, however, can rest easy.
▪ He also seems to want to be the Nineties Coco Chanel, so street fashion bods can rest easy.
▪ He can rest easy on that matter.
▪ No side can rest easy with such a slender lead.
▪ Some local retailer would rest easy in his bed that night.
▪ Surely, the letter said with a surprising burst of bitterness, Eileen Ryan would rest easy in her grave at last.
▪ The sun was up, the dark clouds disappeared and for a moment she breathed easy.
▪ Wall Street and the bond markets can rest easy.
rest/sit on your laurels
▪ But there is no room for resting on our laurels.
▪ But this generous accolade does not mean that we are resting on our laurels.
▪ Little time was granted to Lee and his men for resting on their laurels.
▪ Motorola has long been a leader in that as well, and it has never stopped to rest on its laurels.
▪ That is the only time when you can rest on your laurels.
▪ The religious authorities, who were very active during the nationalist struggle, rested on their laurels after independence.
▪ This evolution of Diamond Rio signals that the group is not ready to rest on its laurels -- at least not voluntarily.
▪ You can never rest on your laurels.
set/put sb's mind at rest
▪ Just to put your mind at ease, we will get a second opinion from a cardiac specialist.
▪ The doctor set my mind at rest by explaining exactly what effect the drug would have on me.
▪ But let me set your mind at rest.
▪ But she'd like to see him, to try and set her mind at rest.
▪ He's been very kind to me and Lily, as regards putting our minds at rest about Stella.
▪ He's unlikely to know how you feel, and until he does, he can't put your mind at rest.
▪ He must set their minds at rest about the Freddie affair, because they knew of Freddie.
▪ I wish I could put their minds at rest.
▪ It puts my mind at rest.
▪ Quite often, all that is required is a friendly chat to put your mind at rest.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ By the fourth day, we were all in need of a rest.
▪ He eats a lot of junk food, and he doesn't get enough rest.
▪ Make sure you have a good rest this weekend.
▪ They decided to stop driving and take a short rest.
▪ Try and give your ankle a rest so it will heal better.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ He was fully responsible for the rest of his life.
▪ In the lounge Lord Beddington was taking a short rest after the exigencies of luncheon.
▪ Is it present with the limb at rest or mainly on movement?
▪ It almost went out with the rest of the junk mail.
▪ One hour later, the circuit breakers shut down the markets for the rest of the day.
▪ Performances have been added throughout the rest of the month.
▪ The rest of this chapter relies extensively upon the research the writer undertook in 1986 and 87.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
easy
▪ No side can rest easy with such a slender lead.
▪ Wall Street and the bond markets can rest easy.
lightly
▪ Your hands will now be resting lightly over your ribs. 3.
▪ Those hands, she thought, one resting lightly on her thigh while the other cleaned the wound.
▪ He could just see Hasan, sitting, as usual, quite still, his hands resting lightly on the desk in front of him.
▪ They scrambled from the police car and headed down a narrow alleyway, their hands resting lightly on their sheathed batons.
▪ Her hands, white to the knuckle-bone, rested lightly on his shoulders.
▪ Tuan Ti Fo stood there for some time, staring at the door, the wicker basket resting lightly in his hand.
▪ Their hands were resting lightly on the wizard's shoulders.
now
▪ The responsibility for that now rests with Parliament and is to be discharged ... in two ways.
▪ And in his dream, the angel returned and told Johnny Appleseed that his work was completed and he could now rest.
▪ The challenge now rests with local authorities in partnership with others.
▪ Since the world economy now rests more on brains than on brawn, intellectual property protection is crucial to honest trade.
▪ Jimmy went back to his conversation with the tattooed man, his thumb now resting casually in Sean's belt loop.
▪ Surrey's requirements now rested with Stewart and Graham Thorpe, who quickly carted Croft straight for six.
▪ The destiny of the NatWest Cup now rests on today's match between North and South.
there
▪ But Friedman argued that matters do not rest there.
▪ Thirty-five administration critics would not permit the matter to rest there.
▪ All this is desirable and, indeed, essential; but higher education can not rest there.
▪ Strangers rested there while children tried on their shoes.
▪ Evidently, the stock market believes that matters will not rest there and Pearl's share price raced up 87p to 639p.
▪ She had climbed the seventy-nine steps to the top of the tower and rested there beside the cupola.
▪ The dead man's father says he won't let it rest there and he's planning to take legal advice.
▪ Again, though, higher education can not rest there.
■ NOUN
arm
▪ You rest your cramped arms for a moment and push again.
▪ When her wooer turned from her she rested her arms against the mantel-shelf and bowed her face in her hands.
▪ It may be a delirious hope, but you force yourself to rest your arms on your chest, crossed and pulsing.
▪ With straps holding the patient against the bed, the patient stood on the footboard and rested her arms on a tabletop.
▪ When the man had gone he rested his folded arms on the table.
▪ Many experts recommend that computer users rest their hands and arms from time to time to avoid muscle injuries.
▪ Nowadays, though, top sailors use the harnesses to rest their weary arms on long races.
▪ Now he had to stop and rest his arms every ten feet.
assumption
▪ The majority of the procedures themselves and of the theoretical results describing their properties rest on certain assumptions.
▪ The strategic order among the major nuclear powers is fragile, however, because it rests heavily on the assumption of nonuse.
▪ Political theory rests on the assumption that these activities are central to the functioning of a democratic society.
▪ However, such schemes rest on the assumption that the small businessman already has an idea he wishes to develop.
▪ But when the proof comes it also turns out to rest on the assumption that it is already true.
back
▪ Sailing inside the Boom By crouching down, you can rise up inside the boom and rest your back on it.
▪ He regularly takes days off to rest his back....
▪ He now pulled up a chair and, turning it about, sat on it, his elbows resting on the back.
▪ She sat silent, her head still propped by the arm that rested on the back of the sofa.
▪ Stephen lay flat, gazing out at the patterns of sunlight, his chin resting on the backs of his hands.
▪ Its ears rested flat back and the long dark lashes interlocked over closed eyes.
▪ Carol sat up, resting her back against the padded headboard.
▪ Millie was standing at the table with her hands resting on the back of a chair, looking down at the tablecloth.
case
▪ Well I rest my case on that one.
▪ Defense attorneys rested their case last week after calling just one witness.
▪ Should anyone remain unconvinced, I rest my case on the Leaning Tower of Pisa syndrome.
▪ I rest my case on what I did.
▪ It rested its case on Dec. 17, 1991.
▪ When Jacobs rested his case May 21, he had paraded 66 witnesses before jurors over the course of 20 days.
▪ I imagine when he rests his case, he will so state in plain terms.
chin
▪ He flexed his narrow shoulders and placed his elbows on the desk, steepled fingers resting against his chin.
▪ He put his elbows on his knees and rested his chin on his fists.
▪ She rested her chin on her knees, preparing herself for the long wait.
▪ She leant her elbows on the table, clasped her hands lightly and rested her chin on them.
▪ Paige drew her knees up inside the bag, resting her chin on them.
elbow
▪ Lee lifted herself a little towards her goddess and rested herself on one elbow, looking up like a child, expectant.
▪ Alvin had strained up to stare around him, resting on his pudgy elbows as if to survey the world.
▪ Stephen took a chair beside the stove and rested his elbow on the long flue that ran across to the wall.
▪ She crossed her ankles and leaned back, resting on one elbow and facing the door.
final
▪ So naturally, coming to his final resting place is something of a pilgrimage for me.
foot
▪ Her feet were resting on a small, aluminium step-ladder.
▪ Buddie was sitting on a hard chair with one foot resting on an upturned petrol-tin.
▪ There was sagging wire beneath the frame, a drip of water plunged sporadically into the space where his feet would rest.
▪ His feet were resting comfortably on the ship's control panel.
▪ He knelt alongside at her feet, his elbow resting on her thigh.
▪ A horse dozes on its feet, resting one hip and showing a minimum of tail.
▪ This will cause both feet to rest on the windward rail, making it difficult to keep the board level.
hand
▪ Have your hands gently resting either side of your navel.
▪ Sit with your hands politely resting on your thighs.
▪ Her arm tightened around him, her other hand resting loosely on the shoulders of another singer.
▪ His right hand rested on his knee; the discolored palm opened and closed as he stretched his corpse-white fingers.
▪ He pressed up close, his hand resting on the slope of her thigh.
▪ The girl harpists' skeleton hands were still resting on the harp strings-or where the harp strings once had been.
▪ Next to him, on one side, Katherine, her hand resting in his.
▪ Sherman stood with one hand resting on the door, wondering if he dared leave it here.
head
▪ She leaned back, her head resting against a red and blue carpet hanging on the wall.
▪ My head was resting against his chest and I felt his heart beating against my eye and cheek.
▪ Her feet still hurt and she felt the tingle of cramp in her right arm where Jane's head rested heavily.
▪ My head, resting on the tile, was only a few inches from the phone.
▪ I had been sitting uncomfortably with my head resting against the door of the car.
▪ His head rests carelessly on the slumbering body of the unknown sarariiman beside him.
▪ She shook her head, resting it against the wood, as her hands stilled.
▪ She bowed her head, resting her forehead against the fence.
knee
▪ He is resting on his knees and appears calm.
▪ Iain Morrison continued to rest his knee injury, though Ian Corcoran was restored after his ankle strain.
▪ Li Shai Tung sat there, his feet spread, the cane resting against one knee.
▪ She had pulled her legs up, her chin resting on her knees.
▪ Tweed checked the small notebook he rested on his knee.
▪ His elbows rest on his knees.
laurel
▪ That is the only time when you can rest on your laurels.
▪ Motorola has long been a leader in that as well, and it has never stopped to rest on its laurels.
▪ But this generous accolade does not mean that we are resting on our laurels.
▪ The religious authorities, who were very active during the nationalist struggle, rested on their laurels after independence.
▪ But there is no room for resting on our laurels.
▪ This evolution of Diamond Rio signals that the group is not ready to rest on its laurels -- at least not voluntarily.
▪ You can never rest on your laurels.
▪ Little time was granted to Lee and his men for resting on their laurels.
leg
▪ She sat at her desk, crossed her shapely legs, rested her hands in her lap and listened.
▪ But, as I watch, even those last legs come to rest.
▪ In the kitchen Mario sat with one leg stiffly in front of him resting on a chair.
matter
▪ But Friedman argued that matters do not rest there.
▪ But this is a matter of policy that rests entirely with the Congress not with the courts.
▪ The matter would not rest here.
▪ Thirty-five administration critics would not permit the matter to rest there.
▪ I was going to knock for I was still intrigued by him but Benjamin called me so I let the matter rest.
▪ Any decision about disciplinary matters should rest elsewhere.
▪ Evidently, the stock market believes that matters will not rest there and Pearl's share price raced up 87p to 639p.
▪ The matter now rests with our local medical committee.
peace
▪ But resting in peace is not always easy.
▪ They need to find the killers of Peter and Gwenda so they can rest in peace.
▪ For Tony, that he may rest in peace, and for his family for their strengthening and peace.
▪ Ashamed of your old man, want the whole gruesome mess to rest in peace?
▪ So much for the residents being allowed to rest in peace.
▪ But the pensioners won't let him rest in peace.
▪ This he would find touching beyond anything: Sien brought to rest, at peace in a thrilling silence.
▪ He was buried in Auchinleck kirkyard but, even in death, he was not allowed to rest in peace.
responsibility
▪ The responsibility for that now rests with Parliament and is to be discharged ... in two ways.
▪ The final responsibility rested with the president, the brothers wrote.
▪ The responsibility for doing this rests with the department managers.
▪ Ultimately, this responsibility must rest with the electorate, but they do not always receive the information necessary to make judgements.
▪ The man who designed the changes in 1993 says the responsibility rests not only with Government, but with all of us.
▪ Given the prevailing views about where responsibility for curricula rested, these findings are not perhaps totally unpredictable.
shoulder
▪ Richards will have to rest the shoulder for at least four months following the operation to tighten up ligaments.
▪ Her arm tightened around him, her other hand resting loosely on the shoulders of another singer.
▪ Suddenly, the barrel shook as a heavy man sat down and rested his shoulders against it.
▪ Solveig slept softly, her legs drawn up in front of her body, her face resting against his shoulder.
▪ They walked slowly and clumsily, her head resting on his shoulder.
▪ He fastened the beads round his neck, arranging the knife so that it rested hidden between his shoulder blades.
▪ His chin was resting on his shoulder and his face was in profile to her.
■ VERB
allow
▪ She was given a clean theatre gown and was then allowed to rest until the theatre porter arrived to collect her.
▪ Wrap in plastic and allow to rest at room temperature for 30 minutes.
▪ They will alleviate the pain and allow her to rest.
▪ Cover with plastic wrap and allow to rest for 30 minutes.
▪ She was upset because I had not been allowed to rest on the drive.
▪ So much for the residents being allowed to rest in peace.
▪ He was buried in Auchinleck kirkyard but, even in death, he was not allowed to rest in peace.
▪ She was shocked and upset and what she needed most was to be allowed to rest, alone.
come
▪ The glass moved more smoothly, more quickly, then came to rest at the figure zero.
▪ Meanwhile, we spun out and came to rest with the car still running.
▪ He rolled a couple of yards downhill and came to rest in a dwarf willow bush.
▪ Finally the raft came to rest, sitting just below the tideline.
▪ She woke slowly from a vague dream as an errant breeze drifted over her face, coming to rest on her mouth.
▪ But the shield held, long enough for the glowing meteor to come to rest.
▪ His eyes had come to rest less on the table and more on her.
▪ Flop flop flop, until it came to rest near my feet.
lay
▪ Some ghosts are being laid to rest.
▪ He was laid to rest in a grave at his settlement on the riverbank and a shrine was raised in his honour.
▪ Then she lay down to rest in the lounge, surrounded by other women who even here never stopped talking.
▪ The initial findings lay to rest a few canards.
▪ He was laid to rest in Chingford Cemetery in a public grave.
▪ Indeed, Darwin, an evolutionist to the end, was laid to rest in the hallowed ground of Westminster Abbey.
▪ Without proof I should really lay the idea to rest.
▪ We exploited the economics of small scale and laid to rest the diseconomies of large scale.
let
▪ Then let it rest for twenty to thirty minutes.
▪ Encourage him to socialize with family and friends. Let him rest if he becomes tired or frustrated.
▪ You've got to find your own way. Let me rest.
▪ And I won't let it rest.
▪ I told him you would not let things rest and would look for me.
▪ After fifteen years he was still pursuing his feud against his master-mason, unwilling to let even his bones rest.
▪ I was going to knock for I was still intrigued by him but Benjamin called me so I let the matter rest.
▪ It was better to let him rest.
lie
▪ Then she lay down to rest in the lounge, surrounded by other women who even here never stopped talking.
▪ The initial findings lay to rest a few canards.
▪ She took the pills and lay down to rest with her eyes closed.
▪ They saw a deer lying down, resting.
▪ At nightfall she was tired and lay down to rest.
▪ Before lying down to rest, he went to visit some of the men.
need
▪ He needed to rest and think, and then to plan.
▪ A player will recover somewhat between matches, but an injured player might need to be rested for longer.
▪ They needed to rest, they said, but showed no signs of doing so.
▪ You need to rest for a few days, but you should be all right soon enough.
▪ To do so, he will need to rest up a little, for an old body is a less willing one.
▪ However, the player needs to rest periodically.
▪ However, he is likely to need to rest at frequent intervals.
▪ Although Sigarup's so thin now, it was a difficult weight to carry and we needed to rest a lot.
put
▪ The exhibition put to rest some of the myths surrounding impressionist paintings.
▪ This, then, is an issue we should put to rest.
▪ The old Five Nations competition, an unofficial series of matches was put to rest on Saturday.
▪ Morales also vowed to soon put to rest questions about a federal government scholarship received by his wife.
▪ But most of your worries can be put to rest with a spoonful of Calpol.
▪ I think this definitely puts it to rest.
▪ It is time the myth of the kilted, bagpipe-playing ambassador is put to rest.
▪ I put this thing to rest a long time ago.
sit
▪ Alice was tired and sat down to rest some 300m below the summit while the two men walked on.
▪ He sat and rested on his stool once he got back there.
▪ Suddenly, the barrel shook as a heavy man sat down and rested his shoulders against it.
▪ Slinging his mac over the back of a pew he sat down and rested his feet on the one in front.
▪ He had just fired up and sat down to rest.
▪ Little Billy found a comfortable place where two big branches came together and he sat down to rest.
▪ Carol sat up, resting her back against the padded headboard.
stop
▪ I had to stop and rest for a moment.
▪ At the mouth of the Umpqua River, they stopped to rest.
▪ He stopped neither to rest or eat until it was almost dark.
▪ Motorola has long been a leader in that as well, and it has never stopped to rest on its laurels.
▪ The magazines were heavy, and Bobbie stopped to rest on the way home.
▪ He had sworn that he would not stop to rest going down the stairs.
▪ She did not dare to stop or rest because immediately she was surrounded by offers of unreliable help.
▪ Now he had to stop and rest his arms every ten feet.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
... and the rest is history
▪ But then he started scribbling away at A Year in Provence and the rest is history.
▪ Dependence was imposed and the rest is history and green beans, cotton tee-shirts, patronage, and serfdom.
▪ He was initially hired by the Oxford Mail, then began to concentrate on sport, and the rest is history.
▪ Manufacturers responded by building cheaper modem hardware, and the rest is history.
▪ She noticed that he had a cute bum - and the rest is history.
▪ Then, when he was 17, he picked up a basketball, and the rest is history.
God rest his/her soul
God rest his/her soul
God rest his/her soul
rest in peace
▪ Ashamed of your old man, want the whole gruesome mess to rest in peace?
▪ But resting in peace is not always easy.
▪ But the pensioners won't let him rest in peace.
▪ For Tony, that he may rest in peace, and for his family for their strengthening and peace.
▪ He hopes to give relatives peace of mind while their loved ones rest in peace.
▪ He was buried in Auchinleck kirkyard but, even in death, he was not allowed to rest in peace.
▪ So much for the residents being allowed to rest in peace.
▪ They need to find the killers of Peter and Gwenda so they can rest in peace.
rest/breathe easy
▪ Craig Chalmers, however, can rest easy.
▪ He also seems to want to be the Nineties Coco Chanel, so street fashion bods can rest easy.
▪ He can rest easy on that matter.
▪ No side can rest easy with such a slender lead.
▪ Some local retailer would rest easy in his bed that night.
▪ Surely, the letter said with a surprising burst of bitterness, Eileen Ryan would rest easy in her grave at last.
▪ The sun was up, the dark clouds disappeared and for a moment she breathed easy.
▪ Wall Street and the bond markets can rest easy.
rest/sit on your laurels
▪ But there is no room for resting on our laurels.
▪ But this generous accolade does not mean that we are resting on our laurels.
▪ Little time was granted to Lee and his men for resting on their laurels.
▪ Motorola has long been a leader in that as well, and it has never stopped to rest on its laurels.
▪ That is the only time when you can rest on your laurels.
▪ The religious authorities, who were very active during the nationalist struggle, rested on their laurels after independence.
▪ This evolution of Diamond Rio signals that the group is not ready to rest on its laurels -- at least not voluntarily.
▪ You can never rest on your laurels.
set/put sb's mind at rest
▪ Just to put your mind at ease, we will get a second opinion from a cardiac specialist.
▪ The doctor set my mind at rest by explaining exactly what effect the drug would have on me.
▪ But let me set your mind at rest.
▪ But she'd like to see him, to try and set her mind at rest.
▪ He's been very kind to me and Lily, as regards putting our minds at rest about Stella.
▪ He's unlikely to know how you feel, and until he does, he can't put your mind at rest.
▪ He must set their minds at rest about the Freddie affair, because they knew of Freddie.
▪ I wish I could put their minds at rest.
▪ It puts my mind at rest.
▪ Quite often, all that is required is a friendly chat to put your mind at rest.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
Resting his spade against the wall, he went to help Michael light the fire.
▪ Her head rested gently on his shoulder.
▪ I rested against a wall for a minute in order to tie up my shoe laces.
▪ John rested his head on the back of the car-seat.
▪ She slid down in her chair and rested her head on the back of the seat.
▪ The doctor told me to take some time off work and try to rest.
▪ We stopped and rested for a while at the top of the hill.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Even in its blackness, the sky did not rest.
▪ Finally, and fatally, it rests on a flawed understanding of the relevant medical facts.
▪ My head, resting on the tile, was only a few inches from the phone.
▪ Political theory rests on the assumption that these activities are central to the functioning of a democratic society.
▪ Sometimes I wonder about those three laid to rest in the old garden.
▪ The wedding platform was made of slats which rested on top of neatly stacked bricks.
▪ With the arm resting on the couch the force needed to accelerate the arm is coming from the material of the couch.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Rest

Rest \Rest\, n. [F. reste, fr. rester to remain, L. restare to stay back, remain; pref. re- re- + stare to stand, stay. See Stand, and cf. Arrest, Restive.] (With the definite article.)

  1. That which is left, or which remains after the separation of a part, either in fact or in contemplation; remainder; residue.

    Religion gives part of its reward in hand, the present comfort of having done our duty, and, for the rest, it offers us the best security that Heaven can give.
    --Tillotson.

  2. Those not included in a proposition or description; the remainder; others. ``Plato and the rest of the philosophers.''
    --Bp. Stillingfleet.

    Armed like the rest, the Trojan prince appears.
    --DRyden.

  3. (Com.) A surplus held as a reserved fund by a bank to equalize its dividends, etc.; in the Bank of England, the balance of assets above liabilities. [Eng.]

    Syn: Remainder; overplus; surplus; remnant; residue; reserve; others.

Rest

Rest \Rest\, v. i. [F. rester. See Rest remainder.] To be left; to remain; to continue to be.

The affairs of men rest still uncertain.
--Shak.

Rest

Rest \Rest\, v. t.

  1. To lay or place at rest; to quiet.

    Your piety has paid All needful rites, to rest my wandering shade.
    --Dryden.

  2. To place, as on a support; to cause to lean.

    Her weary head upon your bosom rest.
    --Waller.

Rest

Rest \Rest\ (r[e^]st), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Rested; p. pr. & vb. n. Resting.] [AS. restan. See Rest, n.]

  1. To cease from action or motion, especially from action which has caused weariness; to desist from labor or exertion.

    God . . . rested on the seventh day from all his work which he had made.
    --Gen. ii.

  2. Six days thou shalt do thy work, and on the seventh day thou shalt rest.
    --Ex. xxiii. 12.

    2. To be free from whanever wearies or disturbs; to be quiet or still.

    There rest, if any rest can harbor there.
    --Milton.

  3. To lie; to repose; to recline; to lan; as, to rest on a couch.

  4. To stand firm; to be fixed; to be supported; as, a column rests on its pedestal.

  5. To sleep; to slumber; hence, poetically, to be dead.

    Fancy . . . then retries Into her private cell when Nature rests.
    --Milton.

  6. To lean in confidence; to trust; to rely; to repose without anxiety; as, to rest on a man's promise.

    On him I rested, after long debate, And not without considering, fixed ?? fate.
    --Dryden.

  7. To be satisfied; to acquiesce.

    To rest in Heaven's determination.
    --Addison.

    To rest with, to be in the power of; to depend upon; as, it rests with him to decide.

Rest

Rest \Rest\ (r[e^]st), v. t. [For arrest.] To arrest. [Obs.]

Rest

Rest \Rest\, n. [AS. rest, r[ae]st, rest; akin to D. rust, G. rast. OHG. rasta, Dan. & Sw. rast rest, repose, Icel. r["o]st the distance between two resting places, a mole, Goth. rasta a mile, also to Goth. razn house, Icel. rann, and perhaps to G. ruhe rest, repose, AS. r[=o]w, Gr. 'erwh`. Cf. Ransack.]

  1. A state of quiet or repose; a cessation from motion or labor; tranquillity; as, rest from mental exertion; rest of body or mind.
    --Chaucer.

    Sleep give thee all his rest!
    --Shak.

  2. Hence, freedom from everything which wearies or disturbs; peace; security.

    And the land had rest fourscore years.
    --Judges iii. 30.

  3. Sleep; slumber; hence, poetically, death.

    How sleep the brave who sink to rest, By all their country's wishes blest.
    --Collins.

  4. That on which anything rests or leans for support; as, a rest in a lathe, for supporting the cutting tool or steadying the work.

    He made narrowed rests round about, that the beams should not be fastened in the walls of the house.
    --1 Kings vi. 6.

  5. (Anc. Armor) A projection from the right side of the cuirass, serving to support the lance.

    Their visors closed, their lances in the rest.
    --Dryden.

  6. A place where one may rest, either temporarily, as in an inn, or permanently, as, in an abode. ``Halfway houses and travelers' rests.''
    --J. H. Newman.

    In dust our final rest, and native home.
    --Milton.

    Ye are not as yet come to the rest and to the inheritance which the Lord your God giveth you.
    --Deut. xii. 9.

  7. (Pros.) A short pause in reading verse; a c[ae]sura.

  8. The striking of a balance at regular intervals in a running account. ``An account is said to be taken with annual or semiannual rests.''
    --Abbott.

  9. A set or game at tennis. [Obs.]

  10. (Mus.) Silence in music or in one of its parts; the name of the character that stands for such silence. They are named as notes are, whole, half, quarter,etc.

    Rest house, an empty house for the accomodation of travelers; a caravansary. [India]

    To set one's rest or To set up one's rest, to have a settled determination; -- from an old game of cards, when one so expressed his intention to stand or rest upon his hand. [Obs.]
    --Shak.
    --Bacon.

    Syn: Cessation; pause; intermission; stop; stay; repose; slumber; quiet; ease; quietness; stillness; tranquillity; peacefulness; peace.

    Usage: Rest, Repose. Rest is a ceasing from labor or exertion; repose is a mode of resting which gives relief and refreshment after toil and labor. The words are commonly interchangeable.

Wikipedia

Rest (album)

Rest, released April 1, 2008, is the second full-length album by Virginian post-rock band Gregor Samsa. The band posted the tracks online at Imeem before the album was released. The album was released in five formats, digital (April 1), unlimited (May 13), limited (April 24), collector's, and vinyl.

Rest (finance)

Rest is a financial terminology, describing the frequency in which an outstanding loan amount is being calculated. Usually the more frequently the outstanding amount is calculated the less the total interest over the entire duration of the loan will be.

Rest

Rest may refer to:

  • Leisure
  • Human relaxation
  • Sleep

Rest may also refer to:

  • Rest (finance), a financial terminology
  • Rest (music), a pause in a piece of music
  • Rest (physics), the relation between two observers
  • Rest (album), a 2008 album by Gregor Samsa
  • Rest (band), Irish instrumental doom metal band
  • Rest, Kansas, a community in the United States
  • Bank reserves, holdings in accounts at the Bank of England, plus cash in bank vaults
  • Support (structure)
    • Rest (cue sports) or mechanical bridge, a device supporting a cue stick on long shots in snooker, billiards and pool games
    • Arm rest
    • Head rest
    • Footrest
    • Leg rest

REST written as an abbreviation may refer to:

  • RE1-silencing transcription factor, a human gene
  • Replica Exchange with Solute Tempering, an enhanced sampling technique in Molecular Dynamics
  • Representational state transfer, a software architecture for distributed systems, including RESTful API web services
  • Restricted Environmental Stimulation Technique, a sensory deprivation technique
  • ReStructuredText, a lightweight markup language
  • Retail Employees Superannuation Trust, Australia's largest superannuation fund by membership
  • Revised Extended Standard Theory, a theory of linguistic competence developed by Noam Chomsky in the mid-1970s

Rest (music)

A rest is an interval of silence in a piece of music, marked by a symbol indicating the length of the pause. Each rest symbol corresponds with a particular note value:

American English

British English

Long (or four-measure rest)

Long

Double whole rest

Breve rest

Whole rest

Semibreve rest

Half rest

Minim rest

Quarter rest

Crotchet rest

Eighth rest

Quaver rest

Sixteenth rest

Semiquaver rest

Thirty-second rest

Demisemiquaver rest

Sixty-fourth rest

Hemidemisemiquaver rest

The quarter (crotchet) rest may also be found as a form in older music.

(The four-measure rest or longa rest is a symbol found in Western musical notation denoting a silence four times the duration of a whole rest. They are only used in long silent passages which are not divided into bars.

The two-measure rest or breve rest is another symbol found in Western musical notation denoting a silence twice the duration of a whole rest.

The combination of rests used to mark a pause follows the same rules as for notes. For more details see note value.

Rest (physics)

Rest, in physics, refers to an object being stationary relative to a particular frame of reference or another object. When the position of a body with respect to its surroundings does not change with time it is said to be "at rest". According to the theory of relativity, it is said that an object is "at rest relative to" another. For example, a train decelerates approaching a station and eventually comes to rest alongside the platform. The train can be said to be "at rest with respect to the station", or, as the correct frame of reference is usually implicit and/or provided by context, simply "at rest".

Given an inertial frame of reference, Newton's first law of motion states that an object at rest will remain at rest, while the motion of a moving object will remain unchanged until acted upon by an external force. An object at rest, therefore, can be described as without velocity and accelerationalthough, according to relativity, an object is either at rest or in motion relative to other moving objects. The concept of "relative rest" is closely linked to that of inertial observers and the statement that nothing is at absolute rest is loosely equivalent to stating that there are no frames of reference which are truly inertial. So-called non-inertial observers are addressed by the theory of general relativity.

In reality, there is nothing at absolute rest. For example, Earth's gravitation constantly pulls objects toward its surface, while Earth is one of the objects the Sun constantly pulls towards itself, causing it to orbit the Sun; the Sun, in turn, orbits the center of the Milky Way; and so on.Two or more than two objects are said to be at rest,if its position with respect to each other is not changing or moving with uniform velocity with respect to each other.

Rest (band)

Rest are an instrumental rock group from Cork, Ireland. The group's sound has evolved over the course of their existence to incorporate elements of progressive rock, tech-metal, post-rock, doom, black metal and math rock. The groups sound is characterised by intricate harmonised riffs, complex drum patterns, unconventional song structures, a heavy emphasis on dynamics and alternating time signatures. As well as releasing one album and an EP on Limerick independent record label Out on a Limb Records, the band has also toured Ireland and the United Kingdom, sharing stages with the likes of Isis, Cult of Luna, Oxbow, Baroness, Torche, Zu, Red Sparowes and Explosions in the Sky.

Wiktionary

rest

Etymology 1 n. 1 (context uncountable of a person or animal English) relief from work or activity by sleeping; sleep. 2 (context countable English) Any relief from exertion; a state of quiet and relaxation. 3 (context uncountable English) peace; freedom from worry, anxiety, annoyances; tranquility. 4 (context uncountable of an object or concept English) A state of inactivity; a state of little or no motion; a state of completion. 5 (context euphemistic uncountable English) A final position after death. 6 (context music countable English) A pause of a specified length in a piece of music. 7 (context music countable English) A written symbol indicating such a pause in a musical score such as in sheet music. 8 (context physics uncountable English) absence of motion. 9 (context snooker countable English) A stick with a U-, V- or X-shaped head used to support the tip of a cue when the cue ball is otherwise out of reach. 10 (context countable English) Any object designed to be used to support something else. 11 A projection from the right side of the cuirass of armour, serving to support the lance. 12 A place where one may rest, either temporarily, as in an inn, or permanently, as, in an abode. 13 (context poetry English) A short pause in reading poetry; a caesur

  1. 14 The striking of a balance at regular intervals in a running account. 15 (context dated English) A set or game at tennis. Etymology 2

    v

  2. 1 (context intransitive English) To cease from action, motion, work, or performance of any kind; stop; desist; be without motion. 2 (context intransitive English) To come to a pause or an end; end. 3 (context intransitive English) To be free from that which harasses or disturbs; be quiet or still; be undisturbed. 4 (context intransitive transitive reflexive English) To be or to put into a state of rest. Etymology 3

    n. 1 (label en uncountable) That which remains. 2 Those not included in a proposition or description; the remainder; others. vb. (context obsolete English) To remain. Etymology 4

    vb. (context obsolete English) To arrest.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

rest

"to be left, remain," mid-15c., from Old French rester "to remain," from Latin restare "stand back, be left," from re- "back" (see re-) + stare "to stand" (see stet). Partially confused and merged with the other verb rest. Sense of "to continue to be" is in rest assured. Transitive sense of "to keep, cause to continue to remain" was common in 16c.-17c., "used with a predicate adjective following and qualifying the object" [Century Dictionary], hence phrase rest you merry (1540s); God rest you merry, gentlemen, often is mis-punctuated.

rest

"remainder, that which is left after a separation," early 15c., from Middle French reste "remnant," from rester "to remain" (see rest (v.2)). Meaning "others, those not included in a proposition" is from 1530s.

rest

"repose, cease from action," Old English ræstan, restan "take repose by lying down; lie in death or in the grave; cease from motion, work, or performance; be without motion; be undisturbed, be free from what disquiets; stand or lie as upon a support or basis," from root of rest (n.1). Transitive senses "give repose to; lay or place, as on a support or basis" are from early 13c. Meaning "cease from, have intermission" is late 14c., also "rely on for support." Related: Rested; resting. Common Germanic, with cognates in Old Frisian resta, Dutch rusten, Old High German raston, German rasten, Swedish rasta, Danish raste "to rest." Resting place is from mid-14c.

rest

"sleep," Old English ræste, reste "rest, bed, intermission of labor, mental peace," common Germanic (Old Saxon resta "resting place, burial-place," Dutch rust, Old High German rasta, German Rast "rest, peace, repose"), of uncertain origin.\n

\nOriginal sense seems to be a measure of distance (compare Old High German rasta, which in addition to "rest" meant "league of miles," Old Norse rost "league, distance after which one rests," Gothic rasta "mile, stage of a journey"), perhaps a word from the nomadic period. Unless the original sense is "repose," thence extended secondarily to "distance between two resting place."\n

\nThe meaning "support, thing upon which something rests" is attested from 1580s. At rest "dead" is from mid-14c., on the notion of "last rest." Rest stop is from 1973. Colloquial expression to give (something) a rest "to stop talking about it" is first recorded 1927, American English.

WordNet

rest

  1. n. something left after other parts have been taken away; "there was no remainder"; "he threw away the rest"; "he took what he wanted and I got the balance" [syn: remainder, balance, residual, residue, residuum]

  2. freedom from activity (work or strain or responsibility); "took his repose by the swimming pool" [syn: ease, repose, relaxation]

  3. a pause for relaxation; "people actually accomplish more when they take time for short rests" [syn: respite, relief, rest period]

  4. a state of inaction; "a body will continue in a state of rest until acted upon"

  5. euphemisms for death (based on an analogy between lying in a bed and in a tomb); "she was laid to rest beside her husband"; "they had to put their family pet to sleep" [syn: eternal rest, sleep, eternal sleep, quietus]

  6. a support on which things can be put; "the gun was steadied on a special rest"

  7. a musical notation indicating a silence of a specified duration

rest

  1. v. not move; be in a resting position

  2. take a short break from one's activities in order to relax [syn: breathe, catch one's breath, take a breather]

  3. give a rest to; "He rested his bad leg"; "Rest the dogs for a moment"

  4. have a place in relation to something else; "The fate of Bosnia lies in the hands of the West"; "The responsibility rests with the Allies" [syn: lie]

  5. be at rest [ant: be active]

  6. stay the same; remain in a certain state; "The dress remained wet after repeated attempts to dry it"; "rest assured"; "stay alone"; "He remained unmoved by her tears"; "The bad weather continued for another week" [syn: stay, remain] [ant: change]

  7. be inherent or innate in; [syn: reside, repose]

  8. put something in a resting position, as for support or steadying; "Rest your head on my shoulder"

  9. sit, as on a branch; "The birds perched high in the treee" [syn: perch, roost]

  10. rest on or as if on a pillow; "pillow your head" [syn: pillow]

  11. be inactive, refrain from acting; "The committee is resting over the summer"

Gazetteer

Usage examples of "rest".

The rest I was prepared to dismiss airily as some sort of unfortunate aberration brought about by the exceptional circumstances of the tornado.

He rested her back against the wall, his forehead pressed to hers, struggling to regain his ability to breathe.

He did manage to use his fire magic on a few of them, setting their shirts and hair ablaze, and that forced the rest to reconsider their attack for a time.

Its principle was the abnegation of selfishness by strictly limiting the expenditure of every member to the amount really necessary to his comfort, dedicating the rest to humanity.

He followed immediately after, covering her with his naked body, then immediately adjusted himself, side to side and up and down so that his chest hairs abraded her nipples and his erection rested between her legs.

These probably sink down besmeared with the secretion and rest on the small sessile glands, which, if we may judge by the analogy of Drosophyllum, then pour forth their secretion and afterwards absorb the digested matter.

Mellis false-flags Banish with his bullshit mine story if there was a claymore mine on this mountain, it would be command-detonated and Abies would have lit it off with the rest of his fireworks then leads him up to the gun site and fucking drops him cold.

There I drank it, my feet resting on acanthus, my eyes wandering from sea to mountain, or peering at little shells niched in the crumbling surface of the sacred stone.

And if I asked Biliktu, after she had rested for a while, to come and join me and her sister, she might sigh, but she would usually accede, and she would give good account of herself.

Recall that Einstein accomplished this by realizing that an accelerated observer is also perfectly justified in declaring himself or herself to be at rest, and in claiming that the force he or she feels is due to a gravitational field.

Even those whom we would normally think of as accelerating may claim to be at rest, since they can attribute the force they feel to their being immersed in a gravitational field.

But if these muons are not sitting at rest in the laboratory and instead are traveling through a piece of equipment known as a particle accelerator that boosts them to just shy of light-speed, their average life expectancy as measured by scientists in the laboratory increases dramatically.

Other officers were standing by radar and radar altimeter, NST transceiver, drift indicator, accelerometer, and all the rest of it.

He had been with Mwynwen frequently, either in his own chambers or her house, resting and leaching out of his body the subliminal aches and slight sickness that extended exposure to iron caused .

Ravensbund as he ruled the rest of Achar, but as far as the Ravensbundmen knew or cared, the Achar King had as much control over them as he did over the Forbidden.