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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

rely

verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
depend on/rely on aid
▪ The report stated that some 703,000 people relied on food aid.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
always
▪ We can not always rely on the fish already being there and feeling hungry too.
▪ Nomatterhow much you learn in theory, you should always rely on what your ear is telling you.
▪ Don't always rely on the bridges marked triumphantly on your map.
▪ When all else failed however the visitors could always rely on goalkeeper John Martin to protect the points.
▪ If the modelling work does dry up, Beckham can always rely on missus Posh, who earns £6million a year.
▪ Rosemary was a friend indeed, and you could always rely on her.
▪ You can't always rely on a partner to do that for you.
entirely
▪ Even so, one in five pensioners rely entirely on state benefits for their income.
▪ For air searches the Force would have to rely entirely on its own planes.
▪ This was good news, but they didn't want to rely entirely on him.
▪ But it has to rely entirely on public donations.
▪ Printers and typesetting houses have been embracing new methods for the last 15 years or so and now rely entirely upon them.
▪ Some viruses rely entirely on the enzymes of the infected cell to catalyse every step in the production of more viruses.
▪ It is best not to rely entirely on the paper copy since continual cross-referencing is tedious.
▪ We rely entirely on the concern of private individuals like yourself.
heavily
▪ Such widely varied writers as Webern, Dallapiccola, and Stravinsky rely heavily on the textures and idioms of early choral music.
▪ Instead, the Bulldogs attacked from the outside, relying heavily on three-point shooting.
▪ Warren accepts that they do rely heavily on advanced industrial societies for economic growth, especially for advanced technology.
▪ Most did not recognize that they were relying heavily upon intimidation as a strategy for influence.
▪ Today's comics are more lean, aggressive characters who rely heavily on sarcasm and politics for their laughs.
▪ Computer crackers, for all their technical savvy, rely heavily on the carelessness and ignorance of their targets.
▪ Many organisations rely heavily on older volunteers.
▪ Consultants rely heavily on focus groups be-cause it is difficult to guess what audiences will like or hate.
instead
▪ He would rely instead on his successful general business experience to pull him through.
▪ They will rely instead on reports from correspondents for their respective owners, Univision and Telemundo.
▪ Voters depend much less on the cues and guidance given them by party workers and rely instead on television.
▪ She said she rarely uses the telephone at work, relying instead on e-mail.
▪ Today, few restaurant companies generate ideas in-house, relying instead on acquisitions or joint ventures with entrepreneurs.
more
▪ By comparison firms which rely more heavily on advertising are described as adopting a pull strategy. 23.
▪ Parents need to read these published materials, acknowledging that some teachers will rely more or less on these.
▪ But I soon had to rely more and more on my imagination.
▪ But all that changed when the Cali cartel switched tactics and started relying more on ships and trucks to transport drugs.
▪ According to Warhurst and Dickson, employers now rely more on appearance and accent than on qualifications.
▪ The preachers rely more on stories than on sermons to carry the message.
▪ The interchange would also rely more on personal meetings whether at seminars or not and some records would not then exist at all.
▪ Eventually Ponyboy and Celie realise that they should always be themselves and rely more on their own inner strengths.
on
▪ This raises doubts about some of the signposts the Fed used to rely on.
▪ It also is a proof of concept, that a large, multinational company would rely on a reduced-complexity computing device.
▪ I made a full statement, the contents of which I rely on for my defence.
▪ This was a strategy I would rely on as I grew older.
▪ Experts would rely on the latest social-science findings as an alternative to prejudice and crowd psychology.
▪ But while more sophisticated procedures may save time, they often rely on more expensive equipment.
▪ Most lenders rely on credit agencies such as Equifax and Experian to check the applications.
▪ In making policy city officials rely on over fifty citizen advisory boards and commissions for citizen input.
solely
▪ It would be most unwise at present to rely solely on luminescence interpretations of geological phenomena.
▪ The professional also learns quickly not to rely solely upon personal qualities and a limited collection of instructional materials.
▪ No longer does evidence of authenticity have to rely solely on stylistic criteria, which can be unreliable.
▪ You will be choosing the organization and then selling yourself to them, rather than relying solely upon answering newspaper advertisements.
▪ But he does not rely solely on technical gadgetry.
▪ Even in portraying the character and spirit of a little cascade one must rely solely upon line and tone.
▪ But it thinks that to rely solely on market forces is a messy way of reining in a big borrower.
▪ They are the restraints on which the people must often rely solely, in all representative governments....
still
▪ But I still rely on intuition and feeling.
▪ States like Massachusetts, which still rely primarily on traditional third-party payment systems, find their costs doubling every five years.
Still relying on your eyes, look at the window frames.
▪ Nevertheless, many Third World countries still rely heavily on selling raw material commodities as their principal source of income.
▪ Even the newest jazz players still rely on a catalog of tunes older than their grandfathers.
▪ As we shall see, some dating methods still rely on the annual passage of the seasons.
▪ Some systems still rely on a batch pagination method while others, like Interleaf, do the whole thing on the fly.
too
▪ They too rely on the wind to distribute their pollen.
▪ The skating of this period didn't rely too heavily on lip tricks.
▪ Inevitably there is a danger of relying too much on Gregory.
▪ But we should not rely too heavily on that distinction.
▪ They intend to monitor models' performance before relying too heavily upon them.
▪ And if you rely too heavily on rewards and punishments and use them too often, their effect becomes diminished.
▪ In fact, he may himself be relying too much on rational analysis in setting ideologies.
▪ We too rely on, if not the direct patronage, at least the goodwill of people in government and high places.
upon
▪ For this reason a few even chose to rely upon peers in other corporations they had met outside of work.
▪ There are several ways to view this publication that you read and rely upon.
■ NOUN
advice
▪ Instead, he believes, they rely on advice from teachers about whether or not an applicant would be compatible.
▪ I still rely on Rachel for advice.
▪ Lastly you might choose to rely on advice to farmers and fertiliser manufacturers.
▪ Many horse owners today can not draw upon years of experience and therefore rely heavily on advice from others.
▪ Being able to rely on advice can be invaluable.
▪ Any minister must rely on the operational advice he is given by the managers on the ground.
clause
▪ The burden of proving that a clause satisfies the reasonableness test is on the party who seeks to rely on the clause.
▪ The burden of proof is on the person seeking to rely on the clause.
▪ It is for this reason that a seller will usually be unable to rely on an exclusion clause printed on a receipt.
▪ The sellers tried to rely upon the exemption clause.
company
▪ If it was a drug company, they rely pretty heavily on impressive animal test data to put the product over.
▪ It also is a proof of concept, that a large, multinational company would rely on a reduced-complexity computing device.
▪ Those companies that do rely on large numbers of assembly-line workers are beginning to have difficulty finding them.
▪ More often than not, cable companies are forced to rely on tips and leads in pursuing pirates.
▪ An international company is likely to rely on agents to sell its products to the country's markets.
▪ The delivery companies will rely on a high level of trust and knowledge of the customer.
▪ Many companies rely on their continuing financial support, but this support is rarely assured for any distance into the future.
government
▪ Translated into today's idiom, the more that local government can rely upon its own tax base, the better.
▪ Entrepreneurial governments rely on information about the results of government spending-the cost and quality of government programs-to detect fraud and abuse.
▪ But that is what the Government rely on.
▪ Indeed, we do not understand the Government to rely on statutory authorization for this seizure....
▪ That is perhaps the weakest of all the indicators on which the Government seek to rely.
information
▪ And Cross soon careered out of control, relying for information on the local International Monetary Fund office.
▪ Entrepreneurial governments rely on information about the results of government spending-the cost and quality of government programs-to detect fraud and abuse.
▪ Do not, however, rely on such information as being either completely accurate or exhaustive.
▪ Managing is unusual in the extent in which it has been shown to rely on informal information.
party
▪ A party intending to rely on documentary evidence in proceedings under the Children Act must disclose this in advance.
▪ The burden of proving that a clause satisfies the reasonableness test is on the party who seeks to rely on the clause.
▪ In normal circumstances the suggestion that a contracting party can rely on his own breach to establish consideration is distinctly unattractive.
▪ It is accepted that the rule does not apply where the party seeking to rely on the document was guilty of fraud.
▪ Where both parties intend to rely on experts there should be mutual exchange, medical for medical and non-medical for non-medical.
▪ Voters depend much less on the cues and guidance given them by party workers and rely instead on television.
source
▪ They rely on four food sources, that from garden cultivation, from collecting, from hunting, and from fishing.
▪ A.. Certainly if you had to rely on those two sources of income alone you would have a very difficult time.
▪ Consequently it is necessary to rely heavily on sources of information from across the Channel.
▪ For this, most news directors rely on fairly traditional sources.
▪ Other, more modest training applications rely on non-commercial sources of funding.
▪ For early data it is necessary to rely on Soviet sources, and Soviet equipment, alone.
▪ At present we have to rely on several sources of information, which sometimes overlap, and which definitely leave great gaps.
state
▪ Even so, one in five pensioners rely entirely on state benefits for their income.
▪ Patients had to rely on varied state rules.
▪ He should consider pensioners who have to rely simply on the state pension and income support or a small occupational pension.
▪ It is not sufficient to rely upon the states.
▪ The more that companies support athletes, the less sportsmen will have to rely on the state.
support
▪ Many of those who have been sent to prison rely on income support alone.
▪ He and his disabled wife rely on income support.
▪ We rely upon the support of the families to retain personnel within the forces.
technology
▪ This is why Kenneth Baker has promised longer franchises for operators prepared to install systems that rely on switched-star technology.
▪ Establishing that networking systems, relying on advanced computer technology, can provide individual service to teachers and special learners. 2.
▪ Nor can they rely on technology from other mainframe firms.
▪ Instead, we rely on technology.
▪ Among the other museums on site, several rely on technology for a 3D animation theatre or a trip through the universe.
■ VERB
continue
▪ Such programmes continue to rely, therefore, on political will and the commitment of those with expertise in operating them.
▪ While the upgrade solves short-term problems, it still means the information pipeline will continue to rely on manual data entry.
▪ I decided we couldn't continue to rely on showbiz.
force
▪ But they're frustrated that most of the time, they're forced to rely on a helping hand.
▪ More often than not, cable companies are forced to rely on tips and leads in pursuing pirates.
▪ Small firms are consequently forced to rely much more on trade credit to finance their operations.
▪ It followed, therefore, that in cases of black revolt, states would be forced to rely on their own resources.
▪ With the advent of Verbivore, however, people are forced once again to rely on their own cognitive and creative resources.
▪ She was forced to rely on a wheelchair to get around.
need
▪ Here we need to rely on our social scientific knowledge about our own legal and social institutions.
▪ Consequently, Iridium will need to rely on more lucrative business customers than it had envisioned.
▪ Like Nelson he was thoroughly familiar with those on whom he would need most to rely.
▪ To convince the inspector, the board will need to rely on its other arguments, to which we now turn.
▪ This would ensure that most pensioners would not need to rely on means-tested benefits.
▪ In such circumstances the purchaser will then need to rely upon the terms of the sale agreement to recover from the vendor.
▪ But we do not need to rely on actual mistakes in the past.
▪ Others may need to rely on it pending the grant of legal aid.
seek
▪ The burden of proving that a clause satisfies the reasonableness test is on the party who seeks to rely on the clause.
▪ The burden of proof is on the person seeking to rely on the clause.
▪ It is accepted that the rule does not apply where the party seeking to rely on the document was guilty of fraud.
▪ That is perhaps the weakest of all the indicators on which the Government seek to rely.
tend
▪ Woman-centred methods also tend to rely uncritically on the particular kinds of scientificity that therapeutic and humanist methods have developed.
▪ Behavioral therapists tend to rely on a variety of techniques and approaches to facilitate recovery.
▪ Courts under pressure tend to rely on devices which take attention away from the underlying issues.
▪ His observations tend to rely on the sort of general disgruntlement that is the writer / drunk's off-duty state.
▪ They tend to rely on a rapid turnover of stock, to keep down inventory levels.
▪ Or does it tend to rely on implicit connections of meaning?
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Don't rely on your Accounts Department to manage the cash-flow for you.
▪ Government ministers rely on the conclusions from the Advisory Committee on Releases to the Environment prior to the field trials.
▪ If managers rely so heavily on verbal information, then that verbal information invariably arrives with an extra verbal overlay.
▪ Instead, they would rely on decentralized, uncontrolled life to sort itself out and come to some self-enhancing harmony.
▪ She needn't rely any more on Rico - or her brothers, she could be entirely independent.
▪ So don't rely on your memory.
▪ Woman-centred methods also tend to rely uncritically on the particular kinds of scientificity that therapeutic and humanist methods have developed.
Wikipedia

Rely (brand)

Rely was a brand of superabsorbent tampons made by Procter & Gamble starting in 1975.

Following a controversial period of test marketing in Rochester and Fort Wayne, in August 1978 Procter and Gamble introduced superabsorbent Rely tampons to the United States market in response to women's demands for tampons that could absorb more menstrual flow without leaking or replacement.

Unlike other tampons, which are made with cotton and rayon, Rely was unique: it used carboxymethylcellulose and compressed beads of polyester for absorption - the company released the new product after having conducted extensive research on its safety. This tampon design could absorb nearly twenty times its own weight in fluid. Further, the tampon would "blossom" into a cup shape in the vagina in order to hold menstrual fluids. Because of this, its advertising slogan was "It even absorbs the worry!", and claimed it could hold up longer than the leading tampon, because it was made differently. "Remember, They named it Rely" was the last line of most commercials.

The superabsorbent properties of Rely caused vaginal dryness by absorbing the natural humidity of the vagina. Often this led to ulcerations in the vaginal wall when the tampon was removed, offering pathways for bacteria to infect the bloodstream. Further, the tampons' superabsorbency meant that the viscosity of vaginal fluids was enhanced, providing a good environment for bacteria growth.

P&G recalled Rely on 22 September 1980 after the Centers for Disease Control released a report that summer, explaining the bacterial mechanisms which lead to TSS, and that Rely tampons were associated with TSS more than any other tampon. As part of the voluntary recall, Procter and Gamble entered into a consent agreement with the Food & Drug Administration "providing for a program for notification to consumers and retrieval of the product from the market". The recall cost Procter and Gamble over USD $75 million.

One very important effect of the attention to TSS in the 1980s was that the FDA implemented regulation of tampons as medical devices and forced manufacturers to standardize tampon absorbencies and include package inserts that warn tampon users of TSS risk. On the market today are tampons made both from synthetic materials, especially rayon, and from cotton only. The key ingredients used in Rely, carboxymethylcellulose and polyester, were removed from the market in 1980.

Reported cases of TSS have decreased dramatically since the 1980s.

Rely

Rely may refer to:

  • Rely (brand), a brand of tampon
  • Rely, Pas-de-Calais, a commune (town) in France
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Rely

Rely \Re*ly"\ (r?-l?"), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Relied (-l?d"); p. pr. & vb. n. Relying.] [Pref. re- + lie to rest.] To rest with confidence, as when fully satisfied of the veracity, integrity, or ability of persons, or of the certainty of facts or of evidence; to have confidence; to trust; to depend; -- with on, formerly also with in.

Go in thy native innocence; rely On what thou hast of virtue.
--Milton.

On some fond breast the parting soul relies.
--Gray.

Syn: To trust; depend; confide; repose.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

rely

early 14c., "to gather, assemble" (transitive and intransitive), from Old French relier "assemble, put together; fasten, attach, rally, oblige," from Latin religare "fasten, bind fast," from re-, intensive prefix (see re-), + ligare "to bind" (see ligament). Sense of "depend, trust" is from 1570s, perhaps via notion of "rally to, fall back on." Typically used with on, perhaps by influence of lie (v.2). Related: Relied; relying.

Wiktionary

rely

vb. {{label|en|with (term: on) or (term: upon), formerly also with (term: in)}} To rest with confidence, as when fully satisfied of the veracity, integrity, or ability of persons, or of the certainty of facts or of evidence; to have confidence; to trust; to depend.

WordNet

rely

  1. v. have confidence or faith in; "We can trust in God"; "Rely on your friends"; "bank on your good education"; "I swear by my grandmother's recipes" [syn: trust, swear, bank] [ant: distrust, distrust]

  2. [also: relied]

Usage examples of "rely".

In affairs of marriage both parties should rely to a great extent on the advice of friends, for mere marriages of inclination are often unhappy.

Relying on the anarchy in France and his arrangements with the Duke of Burgundy, and hoping by military successes to unite the English behind the house of Lancaster, Henry V took up the old war and the threadbare claim to the French crown which had not gained in validity by passing to him through a usurper.

We had relied on our current textbook understanding of the disease: Inhalational anthrax disease does not occur unless there is direct inhalation of more than ten thousand spores.

Perhaps our intelligence relied on the same methods to decide when and where to do extensive air or arty prep along the road.

Priizily because people in the market for an automobile rely upon an Mmnment that contains a lot of automobile messages--the car and assified section of the paper!

I hasted to take her my reply in my own person, and promised not to neglect her, assuring her that at all hazards she might rely on me.

The smooth, gray iron tips gleamed dully in the torchlight, round and barbless, the weapon relying on sheer force of impact, rather than the shredding effect of the warhead for its killing capacity.

The eccentric Bedwell, and the drunk pornographer Thomson, were perhaps not entirely to be relied on.

Would it be the Bellan way, with little from the Birrak, a direct shift to post-voluminates, relying on incredibly elaborate credenza to hold everything together?

Whereas Henthas could always be counted on to resort to lies, betrayal, and brutality, Numar relied on reason and persuasion.

Dismantled by Colonel James, the Blockhouse had now been put into repair, and was garrisoned and provided with ammunition, its commander being Colonel Blague, on whose courage and fidelity Charles could perfectly rely.

But experience shows that in firing it is better to rely habitually on the Breeching, and use the Compressors to assist.

Not having a cooling unit in his quarters had mattered since Kurdish rebels had knocked out the electricity three weeks before, forcing Manesh to rely on diesel-powered generators to provide electricity for the hangar and the communications bunker.

This memorial to Manion the Innocent offered comfort and protection against demon machines, but Jool Noret preferred to rely on his own fighting abilities, as he had done on Ix more than a year ago.

Margery usually dozed in her chair, and it was while dozing that Margery could be relied on to be even more indiscreet than usual.