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regimes

n. (plural of regime English)

Usage examples of "regimes".

To some extent, the regimes are themselves to blame, having deflected criticism of their own political and economic inequities onto Israel and the United States.

In this climate, the Arab regimes feel they need to be very careful about their support for the United States, and particularly for American policies that are unpopular with their people.

Did he think wobbly or upended regimes in Egypt and Saudi Arabia were worth the price of removing Saddam?

The most immediate concerns of the Arab governments are not revolutions but undermining their own legitimacy by highlighting the fact that the regimes do not necessarily reflect the will of the ruled.

Arab regimes feel they need to be very careful about their support for the United States, and particularly for American policies that are unpopular with their people.

The self-system, in other words, is the regime or codon of the human holon, and like all regimes, it is the opening or clearing in which correlative holons can manifest: it is Emptiness looking out through a separate self until that self simply reverts to Emptiness per se.

In what is always a bittersweet moment in the history of Communist regimes, Stalin would soon direct his savagery toward the intellectuals.

Communist regimes were established in South Yemen and Congo-Brazzaville.

Communist regimes were also established in Guinea-Bissau, Ethiopia, Angola, and Mozambique.

The main operation consisted of helping two heinous regimes bleed each other a little longer while getting money to anti-Communists battling totalitarian tyrants in Nicaragua.

Whether they are rooting for the atheistic regimes of Stalin and Mao, satanic suicide bombers and terrorists, or the Central Park rapists, liberals always take the side of savages against civilization.

Beijing, no displeasure is expressed when the regimes in Algeria and Tunisia take similar, if not harsher, steps against their citizens.

Middle East stems from the fear that free elections in Iraq, the Arab gulf states, Jordan, and North Africa will threaten the Arab regimes that help maintain strategic interests of the United States and its access to oil in the region as well as endanger American support for Israel.

That decision was also spurred by the collapse of the communist regimes in Eastern Europe and subtle pressure from Paris.

Unlike the Jordanian government, the Tunisian and Algerian regimes have attempted to suppress Islamic groups.