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The Collaborative International Dictionary

Reel

Reel \Reel\ (r[=e]l), n. The act or motion of reeling or staggering; as, a drunken reel.
--Shak.

Reel

Reel \Reel\ (r[=e]l), n. [AS. hre['o]l: cf. Icel. hr[ae]ll a weaver's reed or sley.]

  1. A frame with radial arms, or a kind of spool, turning on an axis, on which yarn, threads, lines, or the like, are wound; as, a log reel, used by seamen; an angler's reel; a garden reel.

  2. A machine on which yarn is wound and measured into lays and hanks, -- for cotton or linen it is fifty-four inches in circuit; for worsted, thirty inches.
    --McElrath.

  3. (Agric.) A device consisting of radial arms with horizontal stats, connected with a harvesting machine, for holding the stalks of grain in position to be cut by the knives.

    Reel oven, a baker's oven in which bread pans hang suspended from the arms of a kind of reel revolving on a horizontal axis.
    --Knight.

Reel

Reel \Reel\ (r[=e]l), n. [Gael. righil.] A lively dance of the Highlanders of Scotland; also, the music to the dance; -- often called Scotch reel.

Virginia reel, the common name throughout the United States for the old English ``country dance,'' or contradance (contredanse).
--Bartlett.

Reel

Reel \Reel\ (r[=e]l), v. i. [Cf. Sw. ragla. See 2d Reel.]

  1. To incline, in walking, from one side to the other; to stagger.

    They reel to and fro, and stagger like a drunken man.
    --Ps. cvii. 27.

    He, with heavy fumes oppressed, Reeled from the palace, and retired to rest.
    --Pope.

    The wagons reeling under the yellow sheaves.
    --Macaulay.

  2. To have a whirling sensation; to be giddy.

    In these lengthened vigils his brain often reeled.
    --Hawthorne.

Reel

Reel \Reel\ (r[=e]l), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Reeled (r?ld); p. pr. & vb. n. Reeling. ]

  1. To roll. [Obs.]

    And Sisyphus an huge round stone did reel.
    --Spenser.

  2. To wind upon a reel, as yarn or thread.

Wikipedia

Reel (dance)

The reel is a folk dance type as well as the accompanying dance tune type. In Scottish country dancing, the reel is one of the four traditional dances, the others being the jig, the strathspey and the waltz, and is also the name of a dance figure (see below).

In Irish dance, a reel is any dance danced to music in reel time (see below). In Irish stepdance, the reel is danced in soft shoes and is one of the first dances taught to students. There is also a treble reel, danced in hard shoes to reel music.

Reel

A reel is an object around which lengths of another material (usually long and flexible) are wound for storage. Generally a reel has a cylindrical core and walls on the sides to retain the material wound around the core. In some cases the core is hollow, although other items may be mounted on it, and grips may exist for mechanically turning the reel.

Reel (horse)

Reel was a thoroughbred race horse, and one of the greatest American Thoroughbred broodmares in history.

Reel (disambiguation)

A reel is an object around which lengths of another material are wound for storage.

Reel may also refer to:

  • Reel (dance), a type of dance and its accompanying music
  • Reel (horse), a thoroughbred racehorse and prolific broodmare
  • Reel (album), an album by the German artist P·A·L
  • Reel (people), an ethnic group of Sudan
  • Reel language, or Atwot, a Nilotic language of South Sudan that is closely related to Nuer
  • The Reels, an Australian rock pop group
  • Reel Cinemas, a cinema chain in the United Arab Emirates
  • Reel Cinemas (UK), a cinema chain in the United Kingdom
  • Reel Corporation, an Australian film distributor
  • Reel Theatres, a cinema chain in the USA
  • Fishing reel, a device used on a fishing rod to wind the fishing line up
  • Leica reel, a type of storyboarding device in animation
  • Showreel (actors), a piece of video or film footage that displays an actor's work
  • Reel, one of the rotating bands that form the main feature of a slot machine
  • Reel, a complex bird vocalization consisting of several short elements which are repeated regularly. It is a territorial song when used by fairy-wrens of the family Maluridae
Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

reel

I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
back
▪ Once again he blasted out at the first attempt, reeling back amid a cloud of sand and covering his eyes.
▪ She reeled back against the van.
▪ His mind reeled back from the effort.
▪ The shock and force of it sent her reeling back against the wall once more.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A punch in his stomach sent him reeling.
▪ Sam reeled in a 7 pound fish.
▪ The drunk reeled across the road, talking loudly to nobody.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Birbeck reeled out into the daylight, bemused and shocked.
▪ Bowring reeled, choked, flailed his hands, tried to grab at reality, wherever it was.
▪ Cameron's brain reeled slightly under the weight of all these alternatives.
▪ People riotously reel around here, fighting, fondling, tittering, clowning.
▪ She reeled off my 752 failings, whereas I was tongue-tied.
▪ Sofia reeled her in for the kind quick embrace she had received in the hundreds from the older woman.
▪ Tyrion reeled to his feet, determined to sell his life dearly.
▪ When we left, Volkov was reeling from a mixture of liquor and exhaustion, but he remained in high good humor.
II.noun
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
send sb/sth flying/sprawling/reeling etc
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a scene from the final reel of "High Noon"
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And never does he mention a brand of rod, reel or line.
▪ Audio Masters Providing recordings of approximately 10 hours' duration on open reel tape.
▪ Carey's reel clicked slowly, then stopped.
▪ He nodded without taking his eyes from the spiked reel rolling below him.
▪ He rose to his feet and struck up a reel.
▪ His descriptions of everything from lures to reels to fish finders read like they are straight out of a company press release.
▪ Reels: A freshwater spinning reel with 6-pound-test line for the bait unit.
Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

reel

"frame turning on an axis," especially one on which thread is wound, late Old English hreol "reel for winding thread," from Proto-Germanic *hrehulaz; probably related to hrægel "garment," and Old Norse hræll "spindle," from PIE *krek- "to weave, beat" (cognates: Greek krokus "nap of cloth").\n

\nSpecifically of the fishing rod attachment from 1726; of a film projector apparatus from 1896. Reel-to-reel type of tape deck is attested from 1958.

reel

"lively Highland dance," 1580s, probably a special use of reel (n.1), which had a secondary sense of "a whirl, whirling movement" (1570s) or from reel (v.1). Applied to the music for such a dance from 1590s.

reel

"to whirl around," late 14c., also "sway, swing, rock, become unsteady" (late 14c.), "stagger as a result of a blow, etc." (c.1400), probably from reel (n.1), on notion of "spinning." Of the mind, from 1796. Related: Reeled; reeling.

reel

"to wind on a reel," late 14c., from reel (n.1). Verbal phrase reel off "recite without pause or effort" is from 1837. Fishing sense is from 1849. Related: Reeled; reeling.

Wiktionary

reel

n. 1 A lively dance of the Highlanders of Scotland; also, the music to the dance; -- often called Scotch reel. 2 A frame with radial arms, or a kind of spool, turning on an axis, on which yarn, threads, lines, or the like, are wound 3 A machine on which yarn is wound and measured into lays and hanks, -- for cotton or linen it is fifty-four inches in circuit; for worsted, thirty inches. 4 A device consisting of radial arms with horizontal stats, connected with a harvesting machine, for holding the stalks of grain in position to be cut by the knives. 5 A short compilation of sample film work used as a demonstrative resume in the entertainment industry. vb. 1 To wind on a reel. 2 To spin or revolve repeatedly. 3 To unwind, to bring or acquire something by spinning or winding something else. 4 To walk shakily or unsteadily; to stagger; move as if drunk or not in control of oneself.

WordNet

reel

  1. n. a roll of photographic film holding a series of frames to be projected by a movie projector

  2. music composed for dancing a reel

  3. winder consisting of a revolving spool with a handle; attached to a fishing rod

  4. a winder around which thread or tape or film or other flexible materials can be wound [syn: bobbin, spool]

  5. a lively dance of Scottish highlanders; marked by circular moves and gliding steps [syn: Scottish reel]

  6. an American country dance which starts with the couples facing each other in two lines [syn: Virginia reel]

reel

  1. v. walk as if unable to control one's movements; "The drunken man staggered into the room" [syn: stagger, keel, lurch, swag, careen]

  2. revolve quickly and repeatedly around one's own axis; "The dervishes whirl around and around without getting dizzy" [syn: spin, spin around, whirl, gyrate]

  3. wind onto or off a reel

Usage examples of "reel".

With his toes locked in branchiets, Alfin reeled the bird into knife range.

The somnolent Amar stirred, staggered to their feet and joined him in the blue mist, snuffing up smoke greedily, expelling it, sucking in more, till they all were reeling, the sap-smoke sending them higher than the quantities of pika-beer in their bellies.

Fishing the seething tide-race through the main channel at full spring tide, and shouting with excitement as the golden amberjack came boiling up in the wake, bellies flashing like mirrors, to hit the dancing feather lures, and send the Penn reels screeching a wild protest, and the fibreglass rods nodding and kicking.

Bonaparte As he with other figures foots his reel, Until he twitch him into his lonely grave: Also regard the frail ones that his flings Have made gyrate like animalcula In tepid pools.

From its chains dangled various chatelettes made from rustproof materials: brass scissors, a golden etui with a manicure set inside, a bodkin, a spoon, a vinaigrette, a needle-case, a small looking-glass, a cup-sized strainer for spike-leaves, a timepiece that had stopped, and whose case was inlaid with ivory and bronze, a workbox containing small reels of thread, an enameled porcelain thimble and a silver one, silver-handled buttonhooks and a few spare buttonsglass-topped, enclosing tiny picturesa miniature portrait of her mother worked in enamels, several rowan-wood tilhals, a highly ornamented anlace, a penknife, an empty silver-gilt snuff-box, and a pencil.

Like an accident victim, she reeled back a step from their proximity, aquamarine eyes shattered, shame over her own weakness where he was concerned following fast.

Lofty as the army was, that pale and sinister beacon rose above it, towering monstrous over all peaks and concernments of earth, and tasting the atomless aether where the cryptical moon and the mad planets reel.

Journals, tapes, reels, codices, file boxes, bescribbled papers were piled on every table.

Jabba, furious, bashed Bib across the face and sent him reeling to the floor.

He reeled to a stop as Bogie answered his unasked question, answered it With a spear of pain, anger, and bloodlust.

Greater men than Bonaventure would have taken the bait and been reeled in.

A fat man, clothes all-unbuttoned, reeled out of a bordel and made for the nearest lift.

His hard punches drove Brye back, until the older man reeled away, his face buried in his arms.

When they came out they were no longer timid recluses, they were shrieking with laughter, and reeling from side to side.

A round burst five hundred yards astern, then the next went between Chubby and me, a stunning blaze of passing shot that sent me reeling in the backwash of disrupted air.