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Reef (band)

Reef are an English band from Glastonbury, England. The band members include Gary Stringer on vocals, Jesse Wood on guitar (replacing original guitarist Kenwyn House in 2014), Jack Bessant on bass and Dominic Greensmith on drums.

Reef

A reef is a bar of rock, sand, coral or similar material, lying beneath the surface of water. Reefs may be up to below the surface.

Many reefs result from abiotic processes— deposition of sand, wave erosion planing down rock outcrops, and other natural processes—but the best-known reefs are the coral reefs of tropical waters developed through biotic processes dominated by corals and calcareous algae. Artificial reefs such as shipwrecks are sometimes created to enhance physical complexity on generally featureless sand bottoms in order to attract a diverse assemblage of organisms, especially fish.

Reef (disambiguation)

Reef may refer to:

  • Reef, a shallow or underwater obstacle, such as a coral reef
  • Coral reef, a type of reef that is formed by coral
  • Reef knot, a kind of knot
  • Reefing, an action performed on sails to reduce the area on which the wind can act
  • Reef the Lost Cauze, an American rapper
  • Reef (band), a British band
  • Reef (company), an American apparel and shoe company
  • Reef, a slang term for the drug Cannabis.
  • Recife (Portuguese for "reef"), capital of the Brazilian state of Pernambuco
  • Gold reef, a synonym for a gold Vein (geology)
  • Reef, a 1994 Booker-shortlisted novel written by Romesh Gunesekera

Reef (company)

Reef is a brand of casual sandals, known as Thongs. Two Argentine brothers, Fernando and Santiago Aguerre, created their brand in the 1980s. In the 1980s they moved from Argentina to the San Diego beach community of La Jolla, California, where they began Reef. Their product became popular amongst surfers and beach goers. Reef has subsequently grown into one of the world's leading active sandal manufacturers.

Reef is owned by VF Corporation.

Reef (novel)

Reef is a historical fiction novel written by Sri Lankan-born British author Romesh Gunesekera, first published by Granta Books in 1994. Written in English and set in Sri Lanka, it tells the story of a talented young chef named Triton who is so committed to pleasing his master, Mr. Salgado, a marine biologist obsessed with swamps and seafood, that he is oblivious to the political unrest threatening his country. It is Gunesekera's debut novel and second book, following his 1992 collection of short stories, Monkfish Moon.

It was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize in 1994, but lost to How Late It Was, How Late by James Kelman amid much controversy; and the Guardian Fiction Prize the same year.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Reef

Reef \Reef\, n. [Akin to D. reef, G. reff, Sw. ref; cf. Icel. rif reef, rifa to basten together. Cf. Reeve, v. t., River.] (Naut.) That part of a sail which is taken in or let out by means of the reef points, in order to adapt the size of the sail to the force of the wind.

Note: From the head to the first reef-band, in square sails, is termed the first reef; from this to the next is the second reef; and so on. In fore-and-aft sails, which reef on the foot, the first reef is the lowest part.
--Totten.

Close reef, the last reef that can be put in.

Reef band. See Reef-band in the Vocabulary.

Reef knot, the knot which is used in tying reef pointss. See Illust. under Knot.

Reef line, a small rope formerly used to reef the courses by being passed spirally round the yard and through the holes of the reef.
--Totten.

Reef points, pieces of small rope passing through the eyelet holes of a reef-band, and used reefing the sail.

Reef tackle, a tackle by which the reef cringles, or rings, of a sail are hauled up to the yard for reefing.
--Totten.

To take a reef in, to reduce the size of (a sail) by folding or rolling up a reef, and lashing it to the spar.

Reef

Reef \Reef\ (r[=e]f), n. [Akin to D. rif, G. riff, Icel. rif, Dan. rev; cf. Icel. rifa rift, rent, fissure, rifa to rive, bear. Cf. Rift, Rive.]

  1. A chain or range of rocks lying at or near the surface of the water. See Coral reefs, under Coral.

  2. (Mining.) A large vein of auriferous quartz; -- so called in Australia. Hence, any body of rock yielding valuable ore.

    Reef builder (Zo["o]l.), any stony coral which contributes material to the formation of coral reefs.

    Reef heron (Zo["o]l.), any heron of the genus Demigretta; as, the blue reef heron ( Demigretta jugularis) of Australia.

Reef

Reef \Reef\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Reefed (r[=e]ft); p. pr. & vb. n. Reefing.] (Naut.) To reduce the extent of (as a sail) by rolling or folding a certain portion of it and making it fast to the yard or spar.
--Totten.

To reef the paddles, to move the floats of a paddle wheel toward its center so that they will not dip so deeply.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

reef

noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
barrier reef
coral reef
reef knot
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
coral
▪ Many of them were the tops of volcanoes poking out of the ocean, and most were surrounded by deadly coral reefs.
▪ This is true whether you are in a desert or a forest or swimming on a coral reef.
▪ To seaward, bright tropical fish dance in the coral reefs.
▪ The coral sand surrounding coral reefs is believed to be mostly produced by Parrotfish and Triggerfish.
▪ Five years after Gomez launched the coral reef, it is only now configuring itself into self-sustenance.
▪ The beautiful coral reefs are being destroyed by local people selling mementoes to tourists.
▪ Where does the synthetic coral reef end and the chanting wave machine begin?
■ NOUN
barrier
▪ In detail barrier reefs consist of whole series of individual reefs and may have small islands on them.
▪ Thus, the fringing reef would be changed into a barrier reef and finally into an atoll if the island subsided completely.
▪ In fact islands with multiple barrier reefs are unknown, although a very few double reefs are known.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ the Great Barrier Reef
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ For a moment Trent thought of letting the whole damn lot of them go up on the reef.
▪ Have you ever seen an ocean wave pass over a submerged reef?
▪ It was near the ocean and Heather could hear the waves crashing on the reef from where she lay in the bed.
▪ Large shoals may be found on quite shallow reefs or close to the walls of steep drop-offs beyond the protecting reef.
▪ Like most of the true crabs they can be very destructive in the reef tank.
▪ They look as although they belong in a warm and sunny tropical coral reef rather than the dark and cold abyss.
▪ Where does the synthetic coral reef end and the chanting wave machine begin?
Wiktionary

reef

Etymology 1

  1. scabby; scurvy. alt. scabby; scurvy. n. 1 (context Now chiefly dialectal English) The itch; any eruptive skin disorder. 2 (context Now chiefly dialectal English) dandruff. Etymology 2

    alt. 1 A chain or range of rocks, sand, or coral lying at or near the surface of the water. 2 (context Australia South Africa English) A large vein of auriferous quartz; hence, any body of rock yielding valuable ore. 3 (context nautical English) A portion of a sail rolled and tied down to lessen the area exposed in a high wind. 4 A reef knot. n. 1 A chain or range of rocks, sand, or coral lying at or near the surface of the water. 2 (context Australia South Africa English) A large vein of auriferous quartz; hence, any body of rock yielding valuable ore. 3 (context nautical English) A portion of a sail rolled and tied down to lessen the area exposed in a high wind. 4 A reef knot. v

  2. 1 (context nautical English) To take in part of a sail in order to adapt the size of the sail to the force of the wind. 2 (context Australian English) To pull or yank strongly. 3 (context nautical of paddles English) To move the floats of a paddle wheel toward its center so that they will not dip so deeply.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

reef

"rock ridge underwater," 1580s, riffe, probably via Dutch riffe, from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse rif "ridge in the sea; reef in a sail," literally "rib" (see rib (n.)).

reef

"horizontal section of sail," late 14c. (mid-14c. in rif-rope), from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse rif "reef of a sail," probably a transferred use of rif "ridge under the sea; rib" (see rib (n.) and compare reef (n.1)). German reff, Swedish ref, Norwegian riv, Danish reb likely all are from the Old Norse word.

reef

1660s, "take in, roll up" (as one would a section of a sail on a ship), from reef (n.2). Related: Reefed; reefing.

WordNet

reef

  1. n. a submerged ridge of rock or coral near the surface of the water

  2. a rocky region in the southern Transvaal in northeastern South Africa; contains rich gold deposits and coal and manganese [syn: Witwatersrand, Rand]

reef

  1. v. lower and bring partially inboard; "reef the sailboat's mast"

  2. roll up (a portion of a sail) in order to reduce its area

  3. reduce (a sail) by taking in a reef

Usage examples of "reef".

The water boiled around Abo as the shark thrashed, but Abo stayed on and, holding the stick like handlebars, he pulled back to keep the shark from diving and steered him into the shallow water of the reef, where the other men waited with their knives drawn.

The first three waves of Marines had gone in with amtracs, whose tractor wheels just ground their way up and over the coral reef.

The Spaniards approached the island just before dawn, but through the ignorance of the pilot the whole armadilla was cast upon some reefs near the shore.

Now, as he sat off Gruelegra and watched the aviso clear the reef and shape a return course to the south-east, he was in no doubt.

But tell me about this Bight, Jack: are there sirens along its shores, or terrible reefs?

Their calcareous deposits become rocks, reefs, and large and small islands.

I heard the keel grating against the rough calcareous bottom of the coral reef.

However, the tides were set fair for an early start in the morning and Chubby ran us through the channel with hardly sufficient light to recognize the coral snags, and when we took up our station in the back of the reef the sun was only just showing its blazing upper rim above the horizon.

Chubby cut the motors and we coasted in under the lee of the reef, while Chubby scrambled back to where I crouched on the thwart.

Half a mile out, where is the reef, the white-headed combers thrust suddenly skyward out of the placid turquoise-blue and come rolling in to shore.

Dredging the sand-bar and cutting a passage in the soft coralline reef will give excellent shelter and, some say, a depth of seventeen fathoms.

The decapod did not return to the cave, and JJ was unable to locate any of the creatures at the reef or any of the nearby islands.

I remember one day in a reefing job, the downhaul parted and came do on deck from the peak of the spanker.

When the weather moderated, and we shook the reefs out, the downhaul was forgotten until we happened to think we might soon need it again.

And, boy, did they know from tack downhaul, kicking strap, mainsheet, clew outhaul, topping lift, boom, tack, reefing points, leech, spreader, foresail hanks, shrouds, inner forestay, stanchion, toe rail, and fin keel!