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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

recognition

noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
belated recognition/realization/acknowledgement
▪ The statement was a belated acknowledgement that the project had not been a success.
deserve recognition (=public respect and thanks)
▪ The teaching profession deserves more recognition.
diplomatic recognition (=acceptance that a government or organization has official authority)
▪ Beijing's diplomatic recognition of South Korea
formal recognition
formal recognition of the reformed church
optical character recognition
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
belated
▪ Most importantly it is a belated recognition that imperialism offers a fantastically huge and barely mined seam of stories.
▪ Such a belated recognition is likely to strike a reader as old news.
diplomatic
▪ He had hoped for concessions in return, including diplomatic recognition.
formal
▪ Moscow was delighted, seeing formal recognition of its sphere of influence.
▪ During the following twelve months the sultan issued a series of decrees which gave formal recognition to the MiloÜ-Marasli agreement.
▪ Essentially the formal recognition of a union legitimises workers' resistance, and this can immeasurably strengthen their bargaining position.
▪ But any more fundamental change, which would constitute the ultimate formal recognition of their new identity, is to be denied.
▪ Future plans for the Sciences will also involve negotiations with appropriate bodies regarding formal recognition of the new provision.
full
▪ He entered Paris on 25 August and in October his government was given full recognition by the Allies.
general
▪ There is also general recognition that for many years prisons have failed to meet these objectives.
▪ Further the Commission sought a general system of recognition of diplomas, subject to a minimum three years post secondary training.
▪ The above considerations make a general purpose handwriting recognition system a virtual impossibility.
▪ If there is little peripheral information in the non-risky exemplars, attention focusing would have no general effect on recognition sensitivity.
great
▪ The importance of this enabling approach is, happily, gaining greater recognition.
▪ The wines of Bergères-les-Vertus are firm and fruity, with good extract and fine balance and well deserving of greater recognition.
▪ There is a greater recognition than there was five years ago that the ten million people over retirement age are not homogeneous.
▪ They argue that the barriers to participation which exist in society should be given greater recognition.
▪ This has led to a greater recognition of the complexity of development.
growing
▪ Third, there is the growing recognition that Labour could not carry through a radical programme of change without mass support.
▪ Today that link is stronger, as part of a growing recognition that cathedral, parish and diocese all belong together.
▪ There is a growing recognition by educators and others that traditional schooling does not adequately serve an increasingly large number of students.
▪ Today it seems to evince a growing recognition that totalization can not be achieved without a movement involving the transcendence of itself.
▪ But, despite growing international recognition of the plight of elephants on general, the wider problems of their conservation remain.
▪ There was a growing recognition that the war had solved nothing.
international
▪ He appeared at the Montreux festival in 1978, and at last began to get some international recognition as a pianist.
▪ William Golding has the same international recognition.
▪ But, despite growing international recognition of the plight of elephants on general, the wider problems of their conservation remain.
▪ Degree qualifications, of course, already carry international recognition. 6.
legal
▪ If, moreover, the unit in question receives widespread legal recognition, we call it a sovereign state.
mutual
▪ There are also chapters on those areas most affected by the Seventh Directive: harmonisation, equivalence and mutual recognition.
▪ The mutual recognition of ministers and members that is inherent in all union schemes plays a crucial role here.
▪ The 1991 Basic Agreement, which looked forward to a peace treaty and mutual recognition, can also be reaffirmed.
▪ There has to be a mutual recognition among the partners to sacrifice income.
▪ However faster progress is being achieved via the mechanism of mutual recognition.
▪ Steps towards free movement of labour have been taken by use of mutual recognition of many vocational qualifications.
▪ But harmonization will now concentrate on the essentials - the peripherals will be left to a process of mutual recognition by states.
▪ Initially mutual recognition has been targeted at the professions and holders of higher level qualifications.
official
▪ Voters supported proposition 22 by 61 % to 39 %, bestowing official recognition only on marriages between men and women.
▪ The stigmata on this foot was carefully examined during its official recognition in 1597.
▪ Blake returned to London a hero in the eyes of MI6 but the secret nature of his work precluded any official recognition.
▪ But for the forgotten victims - the wives - there is little official recognition, let alone pressure for reform.
▪ A further twenty-three laborious years were to elapse before official recognition of his services to Britain was given.
▪ In this way, for the first time, the Association obtains official recognition.
▪ He gained only minimal official recognition for his work; death prevented his election to the Royal Society.
▪ This afforded Ted Church's involvement official recognition.
optical
▪ This can be on-line or off-line recognition of hand-printed characters, or of machine-printed characters using optical character recognition.
▪ One projected use is for optical recognition experiments.
▪ This could include word processing, a database, case management and optical character recognition.
▪ One example is the method of recognition using template matching which is applied in both speech recognition and optical character recognition.
public
▪ Their Lordships certainly gained added public recognition from television.
▪ Almost as dramatic as the loss of personal or private recognition of their achievements was the loss of public recognition.
▪ On another level, de Gaulle's public recognition of self-determination and the option of independence opened up new possibilities for negotiation.
▪ No public recognition of a claim means no authority.
▪ By dint of their dogged determination and desire for public recognition, they united the shipping interests in London.
▪ In many churches their arrival receives no public recognition.
▪ Another large reservoir of fossil fuels, solid gas hydrates, has recently come to public recognition.
visual
▪ An obvious candidate is a visual recognition system.
▪ Kunihiko Fukushima developed the Neocognitron, a neural net-work model for visual pattern recognition.
▪ We then went on to describe the Johnston-McClelland model of visual word recognition and the Cohort model of auditory word recognition.
▪ There are mazes, obstacle courses, visual recognition games, trial-and-error experiments, arcade-style shooting games.
▪ The only way in which visual recognition of a word can be primed is by previously seeing the word.
▪ Thus hearing a word, or producing it in response to an incomplete definition, will not prime visual word recognition.
▪ The priming experiments can tell us something more specific about the visual recognition system used for identifying words.
▪ Obviously, being transparent makes visual recognition by both predators and prey more difficult.
■ NOUN
character
▪ This can be on-line or off-line recognition of hand-printed characters, or of machine-printed characters using optical character recognition.
▪ Clustering applications would include things like character recognition, sonar / radar signal classification, and robotic control.
▪ Parsytec plans to release an entire family of character recognition systems with prices starting at £15,000.
▪ This could include word processing, a database, case management and optical character recognition.
▪ And character recognition is relatively slow and prone to errors even on powerful computers.
▪ Further details of printed character recognition systems are not included here in order to concentrate on cursive handwriting systems.
▪ Typically context is used only in the form of spelling correction information to compensate for errors in character recognition.
handwriting
▪ Many of these applications may need some form of handwriting recognition.
▪ Script recognition Handwriting recognition is performed either on-line or off-line.
▪ Such tablets first became available in the late 1950's and precipitated considerable activity in on-line handwriting recognition.
▪ On-line handwriting recognition requires some kind of digitising data tablet to capture the script as it is written.
▪ Effective and reliable handwriting recognition will necessarily form an important part of this new technology.
▪ Systems for handwriting recognition Script recognition systems are traditionally most heavily concerned with the problem of pattern recognition.
▪ There are arguments in favour of handwriting recognition.
name
▪ As noted, eurobond issuers need to be of good reputation, whether in terms of credit quality or name recognition.
▪ The purchase provides the Rowling family with lodging properties that carry instant name recognition, analysts said.
▪ Early money will make a big difference in establishing name recognition, especially in the crowded Ward 6 race.
▪ All have relatively low name recognition.
pattern
▪ In other words information is collected at the pattern recognition stage, and all further levels select from this.
▪ Kunihiko Fukushima developed the Neocognitron, a neural net-work model for visual pattern recognition.
▪ Intelligent processes, such as: pattern recognition, image reconstruction, learning, reasoning by deduction, expert problem solving.
▪ It is well suited to speech and pattern recognition applications, and makes neural networks an add-on technology to existing processing.
▪ Simply improving the performance of the pattern recognition module will not produce a recognition performance comparable to that of a human.
▪ Most of them have to do with pattern recognition.
▪ The pattern recognition technique enables the computer to cope with a certain amount of operator error, minor misspellings make no difference.
▪ The following discussion investigates improvements which could be made to augment the pattern recognition information.
process
▪ Discussion: Evidently, collocational information can significantly improve the recognition process.
▪ This thesis examines the use of syntactic information for assisting in the text recognition process.
▪ Most existing recognition systems concentrate on the pattern recognition process, and have not utilised the substantial amounts of available context.
▪ Moreover, the recognition process is a double mirror structure in that a Subject is also recognized and thereby constituted.
▪ Another bias is in the emphasis on recognition processes, rather than linguistic and comprehension ones.
▪ As the character candidates are received from the pattern recognition process the combinations of characters are checked for validity in the lexicon.
▪ A similar recognition process is carried out for static input.
script
▪ Elastic curve matching has also been applied to cursive script recognition.
▪ For the reasons explained above, the interest in script recognition systems has been expanding in recent years.
▪ Systems for handwriting recognition Script recognition systems are traditionally most heavily concerned with the problem of pattern recognition.
▪ Wright's system for cursive script recognition has efficient low-level processing but relies on a dictionary and higher level linguistic processing.
▪ However, parameters for them for individual writers could be extracted from an initial training phase for a script recognition system.
▪ Handwriting, or script recognition is a difficult task due to the inherent ambiguity within the input.
▪ This principle could be applied to the current script recognition system to make best use of all available information.
speech
▪ Despite a large amount of research into automatic speech recognition the results have been unimpressive.
▪ Continuous speech recognition and synthesis are additional examples of tasks neural networks are undertaking with reasonable success.
▪ A commonly used argument in favour of speech recognition is that it is the most natural communication medium.
▪ Areas such as vision, continuous speech recognition and synthesis, and machine learning have been hard.
▪ Our first aim was to examine the lexical access components of a number of existing speech recognition systems.
▪ What you hear will incorporate high-fidelity sound, speech synthesis, and speech recognition.
▪ Noisy Environments: speech recognition is made difficult if interference is created by noisy machinery or extraneous conversations.
▪ Writing allows private communication with the computer that is not possible with speech recognition.
system
▪ Significant improvements were found in the recognition performance of the recognition system.
▪ An obvious candidate is a visual recognition system.
▪ Our first aim was to examine the lexical access components of a number of existing speech recognition systems.
▪ Parsytec plans to release an entire family of character recognition systems with prices starting at £15,000.
▪ However this knowledge is not available in our recognition system.
Systems for handwriting recognition Script recognition systems are traditionally most heavily concerned with the problem of pattern recognition.
▪ Furthermore with a text recognition system, as the lexicon gets larger the problems increase.
text
▪ Analogously, computerised text recognition needs to use higher level knowledge to achieve comparable levels of performance.
▪ An ulterior motive for performing text recognition is to convert existing printed material into a computer format that permits further processing.
▪ The development of reliable text recognition procedures would serve two important functions.
▪ Conclusions A probabilistic syntax processor has been developed to assist in the selection of the correct words for a text recognition system.
▪ There are difficulties associated with automatic text recognition however.
▪ Existing systems for performing text recognition are susceptible to errors.
▪ For an automatic text recognition system to succeed it should exploit as much of the higher level information as is computationally possible.
▪ Incorporation of some of the linguistic information that humans employ is necessary to improve text recognition systems.
word
▪ Models of face processing Finally, I want to move from cognitive models of word recognition to cognitive models of face recognition.
▪ In the first stage of word recognition, cohort reduction occurs as early sensory information defines the word-initial cohort.
▪ We then went on to describe the Johnston-McClelland model of visual word recognition and the Cohort model of auditory word recognition.
▪ In doing so we have argued that the processes involved in word recognition are rather different for spoken and printed words.
▪ As this is the case, part of the research will examine various experimental techniques used previously in studies on word recognition.
▪ Thus hearing a word, or producing it in response to an incomplete definition, will not prime visual word recognition.
▪ However, the implications of the work extend beyond theories of face recognition to theories of visual object and word recognition.
▪ Access to the compound tree is achieved through the word recognition tree.
■ VERB
achieve
▪ All of these situations produce character-level ambiguity which must be reduced to achieve good recognition performance.
▪ The training to achieve a recognition speed of 6o characters per second was accomplished in 3 1 / 2 hours.
▪ Access to the compound tree is achieved through the word recognition tree.
▪ They had to achieve managerial recognition that accountability to colleagues in the team was important alongside accountability to individual agencies.
▪ For example: Handwriting contains many similarly shaped characters which must be distinguished from each other to achieve effective recognition.
▪ Not to have achieved recognition as a failure, felt Dyson, was almost worse than the failing itself.
change
▪ Clearly the role has changed beyond all recognition.
▪ Parenting in many ways has changed beyond recognition.
▪ This is another area which is changing out of all recognition since closure of the colliery and removal of sidings etc.
▪ In the course of a single year, Moon-Watcher and his companions had changed almost beyond recognition.
▪ The weather might be dull, it might be drizzling, but Broadstairs promenade had changed almost beyond recognition.
▪ Since then, the ideas of which Dawkins was an early champion have changed biology beyond recognition.
▪ John Butterworth joined the company as an apprentice 30 years ago he says Westcott has changed beyond all recognition.
▪ But a small error in the procedure could easily leave her inoperable, or at least changed beyond recognition.
deserve
▪ These inspectors nominate those staff they feel deserve extra recognition.
▪ So splendid, in fact, it deserves special recognition.
▪ This is a pity for his achievement in securing the crucial Committee vote deserves the members' recognition for his astuteness.
▪ You need to behave as though you are worthy of, and deserve, recognition.
▪ We train as hard and deserve recognition.
gain
▪ He has given the nurses every support in their efforts to gain recognition, and will speak at their conference.
▪ The brothers' work continued to stir interest and gain recognition.
▪ The importance of this enabling approach is, happily, gaining greater recognition.
▪ M that he began to gain recognition as an offensive coordinator with an effective wide-open attack and the ability to groom quarterbacks.
▪ To gain attention and recognition we need to be able to attend to and recognise others.
▪ Some remained essentially local, some gained a widespread popular recognition, and certain deities rose to national significance.
▪ To gain recognition unions had to accept the logic and rules of the capitalist system.
give
▪ Good practice involves careful listening, giving recognition, with patience.
▪ Female managers are also about 15 percent more likely to give recognition for good work.
▪ Every time you meet some one, they give you rank and recognition according to what you say and how you say it.
▪ We would give that some recognition.
▪ Both parties will give rank and recognition according to individual beliefs and values.
▪ Appeal gives status and recognition to protest.
▪ There are some places where this is done: too few, and far too seldom given recognition.
grant
▪ But in the first, euphoric phase of the disease, only the apparent text is granted recognition by the anorexic.
▪ Mike Leavitt has signed into law a bill banning public schools from granting recognition or access to gay or lesbian student groups.
▪ With time, the government grants a DeFacto recognition by installing running water, electricity, and by paving the roads.
receive
▪ Vast numbers of people, especially among the elderly, receive no financial recognition of their moderate disability.
▪ It is the third year the station has received this national recognition.
▪ Their job does not always receive the recognition which it deserves.
▪ In many churches their arrival receives no public recognition.
▪ In the same year Clovis received some recognition from the emperor Anastasius.
▪ If, moreover, the unit in question receives widespread legal recognition, we call it a sovereign state.
▪ Her success had been due to her own qualities; and she had even received national recognition for some of her work.
▪ But it is essential that the originators receive due recognition.
win
▪ Lawrence, however, feels the team have not won the recognition they deserve.
▪ The program, Striving Toward Excellence in Performance, ultimately won national recognition for innovation in government.
▪ There was still the bitter disappointment of his failure to win the recognition he deserved.
▪ By 1920 she had proved herself by earning a living in a difficult world, and by winning recognition in literary circles.
▪ Before he was incapacitated, Menelik had won recognition for his conquests and acceptance of his new frontiers.
▪ It was those sessions which won the band initial recognition and a recording contract.
▪ Meanwhile, the Mossley Mill project has also won national recognition.
▪ Now, however, Louisa is winning the recognition her well composed and deeply appealing pictures deserve.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Although he was popular in Europe, Hendrix had yet to achieve recognition in his home country.
▪ In 1991, Bush granted diplomatic recognition to Russia.
▪ She had to spend 10 years as a struggling artist, before receiving any recognition for her work.
▪ She stared at him without recognition for a few seconds.
▪ Women painters got little recognition in those days.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Effective and reliable handwriting recognition will necessarily form an important part of this new technology.
▪ He appeared at the Montreux festival in 1978, and at last began to get some international recognition as a pianist.
▪ Instead of recognition, supervisors focused on controlling workers-looking for and documenting rule infractions.
▪ It is suggested that recognition of this distinction is fundamental to the efficient and economical design and execution of stability tests.
▪ Most of them have to do with pattern recognition.
▪ The area of research is the automatic recognition of handwriting and printed text by computer.
▪ With appropriate coaching and recognition, you can help your employees be more productive and meet these goals.
Wikipedia

Recognition (EP)

Recognition is the name of the Extended Play vinyl record (an EP) released in 1983 on A&M records by Scottish rock band Europeans.

Recognition

Recognition may refer to:

  • Award, something given in recognition of an achievement

Recognition (sociology)

Recognition in sociology is public acknowledgement of person's status or merits (achievements, virtues, service, etc.). In the field of psychology, it is understood that a person who seeks excessive recognition could themselves be exhibiting traits of a narcissistic personality disorder.

When some person is recognized, he or she is accorded some special status, such as title or classification.

Recognition (diplomacy)

Recognition (tax)

In U.S. Federal income tax lawrecognition is among a series of prerequisites to the manifestation of gains and losses used to determine tax liability. First, in the series for manifesting gain and loss, a taxpayer must " realize" gain and loss. This word "realize" is a term of art that refers to the realization requirement where the taxpayer must receive or lose something of monetary value. Once the realization requirement is met, gains and losses are taken into account only to the extent that they are also "recognized."

Internal Revenue Code section 1001(c) provides that gains and losses, if realized, are also recognized unless otherwise provided in the Code. This default rule has several exceptions, called “nonrecognition” rules, which are scattered throughout the Code. These exceptions often apply in situations in which a taxpayer shifts his investment from one piece of property to another piece of property. In such cases, where the taxpayer is merely continuing his investment, it makes sense to defer the recognition of any gain or loss realized until the taxpayer truly ends the investment.

Internal Revenue Code sections 1031 through 1045 provide the most commonly implicated nonrecognition rules, including the section 1031 rule for Like-Kind Exchanges.

Recognition (parliamentary procedure)

In parliamentary procedure, recognition, or assignment of the floor, is the exclusive right to be heard at that time by a member of a deliberative assembly. With a few exceptions, a member must be recognized by the chair before engaging in debate or making a motion.

Recognition (family law)

Recognition is the process in some jurisdictions whereby a man is recognised as the father of a child in situations where there is no presumption of paternity, generally due to the mother being unwed. Historically due to the Roman law principle of Mater semper certa est (the mother is always certain) this action was not available to mothers, but since the introduction of in-vitro fertilisation this has changed. It is an act that confers legitimacy on the child.

WordNet

recognition

  1. n. the state or quality of being recognized or acknowledged; "the partners were delighted with the recognition of their work"; "she seems to avoid much in the way of recognition or acknowledgement of feminist work prior to her own" [syn: acknowledgment, acknowledgement]

  2. the process of recognizing something or someone by remembering; "a politician whose recall of names was as remarkable as his recognition of faces"; "experimental psychologists measure the elapsed time from the onset of the stimulus to its recognition by the observer" [syn: identification]

  3. approval; "give her recognition for trying"; "he was given credit for his work"; "give her credit for trying"; "the credits were given at the end of the film" [syn: credit]

  4. coming to understand something clearly and distinctly; "a growing realization of the risk involved"; "a sudden recognition of the problem he faced"; "increasing recognition that diabetes frequently coexists with other chronic diseases" [syn: realization, realisation]

  5. (biology) the ability of one molecule to attach to another molecule that has a complementary shape; "molecular recognition drives all of biology, for instance, hormone and receptor or antibody-antigen interactions or the organization of molecules into larger biologically active entities"

  6. the explicit and formal acknowledgement of a government or of the national independence of a country; "territorial disputes were resolved in Guatemala's recognition of Belize in 1991"

  7. an acceptance (as of a claim) as true and valid; "the recognition of the Rio Grande as a boundary between Mexico and the United States"

  8. designation by the chair granting a person the right to speak in a deliberative body; "he was unable to make his motion because he couldn't get recognition by the chairman"

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

recognition

mid-15c., "knowledge of an event or incident; understanding," from Middle French recognition (15c.) and directly from Latin recognitionem (nominative recognitio) "a reviewing, investigation, examination," noun of action from past participle stem of recognoscere "to acknowledge, know again; examine" (see recognize).\n

\nSense of "formal avowal of knowledge and approval" is from 1590s; especially acknowledgement of the independence of a country by a state formerly exercising sovereignty (1824). Meaning "a knowing again" is from 1798.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Recognition

Recognition \Rec`og*ni"tion\ (r[e^]k`[o^]g*n[i^]sh"[u^]n), n. The act of recognizing, or the state of being recognized; acknowledgment; formal avowal; knowledge confessed or avowed; notice.

The lives of such saints had, at the time of their yearly memorials, solemn recognition in the church of God.
--Hooker.

Wiktionary

recognition

n. 1 the act of recognizing or the condition of being recognized 2 an awareness that something observed has been observed before 3 acceptance as valid or true 4 official acceptance of the status of a new government by that of another country 5 honour, favourable note, or attention

Usage examples of "recognition".

Lydia still had not looked at Ambry except for that first startled moment of recognition.

True, her mature writing was more directly influenced by close friendships with historians such as Mignet and Thierry, yet she always retained an appreciative recognition of how Lafayette had helped her reconstruct her life in France.

Both Digby and I were preoccupied and did not converse much, yet there was a kind of harmony in our silence, and I had felt the faintest inkling of a distaste for Britten Street and a recognition that honourable behaviour does impress one and convince one of its validity.

His unburnable possessions were melted beyond recognition before joining the bone balls, and drifted down through the water to the accompaniment of piscine burps and belches.

All I had in my hand was a bunch of busted metal and broken wheels and springs, bent and smashed plumb beyond recognition.

The Recognitions and Homilies, in the form in which we have them, do not belong to the second century, but at the very earliest to the first half of the third.

He prided himself on the recognition and appreciation of beauty whether it be in horseflesh or poetry or women.

XVII WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY ESTABLISHED Marconi Goes to England--he Confounds the Skeptics--A Message to France Without Wires--The Attempt to Span the Ocean--Marconi in America Receives the First Message from Europe--Fame and Recognition Achieved.

Along the walls were glass and mirrory surfaces that reflected random images, distorting their shapes out of recognition, and Kerwin saw himself, a lean streak of black uniform topped with a brief crimson flame of hair.

Will is to be taken in its strict sense, and not misapplied to the mere recognition of need.

States Navy, was dismissed from the service under a misapprehension in regard to his loyalty to the Government, from the circumstance that several oaths were transmitted to him and the Navy Department failed to receive any recognition of them.

In short, the paradigm shift is defined, at least initially, by the recognition that only an established power, overdetermined with respect to and relatively autonomous from the sovereign nation-states, is capable of functioning as the center of the new world order, exercising over it an effective regulation and, when necessary, coercion.

If she had reached out with her percipience, she would have felt a shock of recognition and eagerness galvanize the Ranyhyn.

Claribel had gone a good deal pinker than she already was by reason of her haste and his gaze paused momentarily at her astonished face and then swept on without any sign of recognition.

Rebecca Mary was a Plummer too, but she did not think of that, unless the unswerving determination in her stout little heart was the unconscious recognition of it.