Find the word definition

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

rear

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a front/rear tyre
▪ I bought a set of new front tyres.
a rear door (=a door at the back of a vehicle)
▪ The kids opened the rear doors and climbed in.
rear admiral
the back/rear wheel
▪ The rear wheels of the bus got stuck in a creek.
the front/back/rear seat (=in a car)
▪ Never leave bags on the back seat of a car.
the front/back/rear/side entrance
▪ There is a long drive with steps leading to the front entrance.
the front/rear/side exit
▪ When the lights dimmed, she slipped out by the rear exit.
the rear window (=the back window, especially of a car)
▪ The car's rear window had been bashed in.
the rear/front brakes (=for the rear/front wheels)
▪ The rear brakes were ineffective.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
end
▪ Tricia kept me up-to-date on the increasing soreness of her rear end.
▪ He wiggled his rear end in emphasis, and we both laughed at his joke.
▪ Both of his big hands were open on her rear end.
■ VERB
enter
▪ Property was stolen from a residence entered by forcing a rear door.
▪ Cash was stolen from a business entered through a rear door.
▪ A residence was entered through a rear door.
▪ Telephones, keys and a vehicle were stolen from a residence entered through a rear door.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
front/rear/back wheels
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Get up off your rear end!
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A small porch at the rear can be used for other small items, although access is only from inside.
▪ That's all, apart from the domestic quarters at the rear.
▪ They glittered like the backs of scarabs caught in torchlight at the rear of a tomb.
▪ We need that certain dunk, that certain kick in the rear, and he definitely gives it to us every game.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
up
▪ Suddenly the drive ended in a gravel sweep and the house reared up on the left.
▪ Cut loose from its eyes suddenly, the mind will rear up, spin, retreat.
▪ A rider's horse reared up before her.
▪ Florida rattlers would rear up and bite a man too blind and tired to kick before reaching down.
▪ The Worm turned and reared up at them, and there was something in its sightless head that they knew showed satisfaction.
▪ It is a daunting task in a crowded, segmented marketplace where magazines rear up and expire as quickly as fruit flies.
▪ The beast reared up on its hind legs, screaming with blood showing at its lips and teeth.
▪ I was on a new pony who suddenly reared up and fell back on me.
■ NOUN
child
▪ Furthermore, the conditions under which child rearing occurs frequently makes it difficult for women to really enjoy that experience.
▪ Black psychologists crushed the notion that child rearing was the same, regardless of cultural background.
▪ Most children are reared by their natural parents and most are cared for well.
▪ Equally important, my parent had no one with whom to discuss child rearing or domestic crises.
▪ The child they had reared until some solution could be found.
▪ Polygamy is prevented by wives who resent sharing their husbands lest they also share his contributions to child rearing.
▪ Any partnership requires love, whether it is for child rearing, for economic reasons, or for any other mutual project.
▪ At Hubbard Woods Elementary an even more graphic example of the troubled world our children face reared its ugly head.
head
▪ A small worm of self-disgust reared its blind head within his belly.
▪ In addition, politics has reared its ugly head, all institutional efforts not withstanding.
▪ At this point another problem reared its head.
▪ It rears its ugly head every time a similar shooting occurs at another school.
▪ It reared high above their heads and made the river market into a town of ants, the meaningless scurryings of insects.
▪ At Hubbard Woods Elementary an even more graphic example of the troubled world our children face reared its ugly head.
▪ The question of remarriage and the provision of an heir to the unstable throne was inevitably rearing its head.
▪ One troublesome objection rears its head whenever we address this situation.
horse
▪ A rider's horse reared up before her.
▪ The roan horse reared once more, pawed at the air, forcing the other men away.
▪ The horse reared, Southgate pitched out of his saddle and was dragged along, one boot still caught in the stirrup.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ cattle rearing
▪ She's reared a large family.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Hamsters reared in the laboratory can be made to have female-biased litters by keeping them hungry during adolescence or pregnancy.
▪ If the quail have been reared with siblings, both sexes prefer to mate with first cousins.
▪ Reclamation in 1987 stopped generating power during critical salmon spawning and rearing months.
▪ Reports about the costs of rearing children are more than we can take in.
▪ Riven hung on to his mount's bridle grimly whilst it bucked and reared in a desperate effort to get away.
▪ The Worm turned and reared up at them, and there was something in its sightless head that they knew showed satisfaction.
▪ They all reared and exploded inside her - touch, smell, taste.
▪ Women who dropped out temporarily to rear children found themselves professionally penalized for the rest of their lives.
III.adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
axle
▪ Replacing a Range Rover's ball joint which joins rear axle to A frame Military or civvy?
▪ I wonder if you could tell me who could supply parts for the output differential to the second rear axle.
▪ If we had to cite a bad point, it would be the hard-to-reach drain plug on the rear axle housing.
▪ I argue that rear axle radius location arm must be out of true.
▪ This increasing castor thus compensates for any inclination of the car on the rear axle.
▪ Third provides direct drive and fourth an overdrive, driving through a new two-piece propshaft to a 3.07:1 rear axle.
▪ Wheelbase is the horizontal distance between front and rear axle centres.
brake
▪ The brakes consisted of two inefficient rear brakes and one transmission front brake, usually full of oil.
▪ He's now heavy on the front brake, while his right foot strokes the rear brake lever.
▪ Do the test again with the rear brake.
bumper
▪ Using black trimmings, shape the front and rear bumpers and a rectangle for the radiator.
▪ Old Chao showed them the spare tire, which rode in its own metal case on the rear bumper.
▪ Somebody yelled and threw a can at the cab, hitting it on the rear bumper.
▪ Almost immediately, Sprague tags a braking Rezendes in the rear bumper, nearly sending Rezendes into a 180-degree spin.
▪ MacLane was still hard on our rear bumper.
▪ When the car arrived I noticed a large dent in the rear bumper and immediately lost my temper.
▪ I have unsuccessfully been searching for a set of military rear bumpers.
door
▪ Silver-topped flasks conveniently placed inside the rear door of the Rolls-Royce.
▪ He knocked twice, then once, on the rear door.
▪ Secluded rear doors are especially vulnerable: they are often forced open with a simple well-aimed kick.
▪ He kept watching out the window of the rear door.
▪ If a would-be burglar was standing outside your front or rear door, how many neighbours could see him?
▪ He sat by the rear door of the hearse with a gun in each hand while Jack bled and bled.
▪ When Ruth and Miss Beard arrived at the rear door of the house, the carriage was already waiting.
▪ He also throws open the rear door, revealing a video screen.
entrance
▪ The nearest rear entrance belonged to a home bakery.
▪ From there, a quiet backstreet led to the rear entrance of her apartment block.
▪ I got dressed and went into the barn and looked for the old wooden trunk near the rear entrance.
▪ They did however have the convenience of a rear entrance.
▪ She garaged her car and thought briefly of entering the apartment block by the rear entrance.
▪ Beside it was an alleyway which provided rear entrances to a row of Botanic Avenue shops.
foot
▪ The advancing foot of the walker must make contact with the ground before the rear foot leaves the ground.
▪ As a rule of thumb, always use a rear foot kick after a feint.
▪ Then thrust off your rear foot, driving your open hand across the opponent's leading guard.
▪ The rear foot is used because it has the forward thrust of the body behind it.
▪ The tiger has five in each of its front feet and four in its rear feet.
▪ Jump diagonally forwards with the front leg and pick the rear foot up for a high roundhouse kick.
▪ Jump diagonally back with the rear foot and perform a front foot roundhouse kick.
▪ From the natural stance, the front foot moves a little farther out from the body and into line with the rear foot.
garden
▪ Externally, both front and rear gardens have been landscaped.
▪ There is a pleasant rear garden.
▪ When Beth first came to the house, the rear garden was derelict.
▪ Doors to conservatory and rear garden.
▪ It benefits from a large detached garage and an enclosed 90' rear garden.
▪ Features include mature rear garden in addition to a detached garage approached via a shared driveway.
▪ Each house had its own private rear garden.
▪ The property benefits from two separate reception rooms, stripped doors and woodwork, off road parking and a 90' rear garden.
guard
▪ Try to scoop the outstretched foot with your rear guard hand.
▪ He informed us that our brigade was to be the rear guard of the army, which was in full retreat.
▪ Slide diagonally forwards, catching the opponent's front kick with your rear guard hand.
▪ As feminist symbols, they are in the rear guard.
▪ As before, the rear guard hand must never cross the body's centre-line.
▪ Let your rear guard hand move forwards slightly as you do this.
leg
▪ However, this area is tender, so be gentle. 2 Work upwards when brushing the rear legs.
▪ This is done as he lifts his rear leg to kick the attacker.
▪ Repeat the exercise but kick with the front or rear leg as soon as the stance switches.
▪ The two pairs of rear legs end in bristles.
▪ Front and rear legs are thrown neither in nor out, as the imprint of hind feet should touch that of forefeet.
▪ You can easily see the effect by placing a telephone book under each of the rear legs of a ordinary kitchen chair.
▪ From a forward fighting stance, the student swings his rear leg forward and upward until the knee comes to shoulder height.
▪ The rear leg bends at the knee, supporting all the body weight.
mirror
▪ In his rear mirror he watched his father struggle with the doors and manhandle the basket on to the ground.
▪ He could see her in his rear mirror, standing on the pavement looking wistfully after him.
▪ But all the time he found his eyes fixed to the rear mirror, looking for a sign of pursuit.
seat
▪ The two forward seats distorted, but remained attached to the floor rails, and the rear seats were undamaged.
▪ Aide Julie Hart noted that most safety experts have said children usually are safer in the rear seat in a crash.
▪ He climbed into the rear seat of the ford.
▪ He rode with Kirilenko in the rear seat of a black Volga.
▪ Impossible to see who the passenger in the rear seat was.
▪ Both are welcome, but the rear seat still is no place for an adult on a long trip.
▪ Within seconds Harry was sitting in the rear seat, searching for his next words.
▪ He saw that in the long rear seat he had cornered some one.
tyre
▪ The team chose a wet front and an intermediate rear tyre.
▪ By forcing down on the upper, outside footrest the rider obtains exceptional feel for rear tyre grip.
▪ At the moment, a wider rear tyre is the main clue to the bike's extra power.
▪ Fork truck rear tyre soft. 25.
▪ Suddenly I had a lot more feel for what the rear tyre was doing, or not doing for that matter.
▪ Guessing what the dispute was over, Fenn swung in towards the vehicle's rear tyre and stopped.
▪ An hour later a rear tyre blew.
wheel
▪ The motor drives the car's single rear wheel by means of a chain.
▪ Turn your front wheels in the direction of the skid, the direction in which the rear wheels are sliding.
▪ I think it was Zonta and I hit him on the rear wheel.
▪ Most often this occurs when you are braking a front-drive car and the rear wheels lock up.
▪ And use the extra money to get those rear wheels working for a living.
▪ Both are still on show in Niagara, complete with the rear wheels.
▪ Roll angles and braking forces also cause a controlled toe-in of the rear wheels for improved stability.
▪ After further processing, hydrogen is delivered to a stack of fuel cells energizing electric motors that drive the rear wheels.
window
▪ Minutes later the owner returned and found the rear window of the car smashed and the case stolen.
▪ He dives in and helps two children out the open rear window of the car.
▪ An old Ford, with straight back and matchbox rear window, laboured up the avenue.
▪ A bullet went crashing through the rear window, shattering the glass behind me.
▪ From here you are looking into the rear windows of Whitehall.
▪ On the way home, she kept looking over her shoulder through the rear window to their cargo.
▪ However, £200 damage was caused to a rear window.
▪ The children would gather in a noisy clump at the rear window to shout encouragement and offer coaching tips to their pursuer.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Go around back and knock at the rear entrance.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A bullet went crashing through the rear window, shattering the glass behind me.
▪ A police spokesman said the stolen car was in poor condition with a broken rear passenger window.
▪ He sat by the rear door of the hearse with a gun in each hand while Jack bled and bled.
▪ Headroom abounds; rear legroom is good.
▪ Silver-topped flasks conveniently placed inside the rear door of the Rolls-Royce.
▪ The rear foot is used because it has the forward thrust of the body behind it.
▪ The captain and rear admiral, viewing the aircraft-launching operations from the island, are blinded by the flash.
▪ Then he opened the rear door and painfully eased himself out to stand, swaying, alongside the car.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Rear

Rear \Rear\, v. i. To rise up on the hind legs, as a horse; to become erect.

Rearing bit, a bit designed to prevent a horse from lifting his head when rearing.
--Knight.

Rear

Rear \Rear\, a. Being behind, or in the hindmost part; hindmost; as, the rear rank of a company.

Rear admiral, an officer in the navy, next in rank below a vice admiral and above a commodore. See Admiral.

Rear front (Mil.), the rear rank of a body of troops when faced about and standing in that position.

Rear guard (Mil.), the division of an army that marches in the rear of the main body to protect it; -- used also figuratively.

Rear line (Mil.), the line in the rear of an army.

Rear rank (Mil.), the rank or line of a body of troops which is in the rear, or last in order.

Rear sight (Firearms), the sight nearest the breech.

To bring up the rear, to come last or behind.

Rear

Rear \Rear\, n. [OF. riere behind, backward, fr. L. retro. Cf. Arrear.]

  1. The back or hindmost part; that which is behind, or last in order; -- opposed to front.

    Nipped with the lagging rear of winter's frost.
    --Milton.

  2. Specifically, the part of an army or fleet which comes last, or is stationed behind the rest.

    When the fierce foe hung on our broken rear.
    --Milton.

Rear

Rear \Rear\ (r[=e]r), adv. Early; soon. [Prov. Eng.]

Then why does Cuddy leave his cot so rear?
--Gay.

Rear

Rear \Rear\ (r[=e]r), v. t. To place in the rear; to secure the rear of. [R.]

Rear

Rear \Rear\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Reared (r[=e]rd); p. pr. & vb. n. Rearing.] [AS. r[=ae]ran to raise, rear, elevate, for r[=ae]san, causative of r[=i]san to rise. See Rise, and cf. Raise.]

  1. To raise; to lift up; to cause to rise, become erect, etc.; to elevate; as, to rear a monolith.

    In adoration at his feet I fell Submiss; he reared me.
    --Milton.

    It reareth our hearts from vain thoughts.
    --Barrow.

    Mine [shall be] the first hand to rear her banner.
    --Ld. Lytton.

  2. To erect by building; to set up; to construct; as, to rear defenses or houses; to rear one government on the ruins of another.

    One reared a font of stone.
    --Tennyson.

  3. To lift and take up. [Obs. or R.]

    And having her from Trompart lightly reared, Upon his courser set the lovely load.
    --Spenser.

  4. To bring up to maturity, as young; to educate; to instruct; to foster; as, to rear offspring.

    He wants a father to protect his youth, And rear him up to virtue.
    --Southern.

  5. To breed and raise; as, to rear cattle.

  6. To rouse; to stir up. [Obs.]

    And seeks the tusky boar to rear.
    --Dryden.

    Syn: To lift; elevate; erect; raise; build; establish. See the Note under Raise, 3 (c) .

Wiktionary

rear

Etymology 1 alt. 1 (context transitive English) To raise physically; to lift up; to cause to rise, to elevate. 2 (context transitive English) To construct by building; to set up 3 (context transitive English) To raise spiritually; to lift up; to elevate morally. 4 (context transitive obsolete English) To lift and take up. 5 (context transitive English) To bring up to maturity, as offspring; to educate; to instruct; to foster. 6 (context transitive English) To breed and raise; as, to rear cattle (cattle-rearing). 7 (context transitive obsolete English) To rouse; to strip up. 8 (context intransitive English) To rise up on the hind legs, as a bolting horse. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To raise physically; to lift up; to cause to rise, to elevate. 2 (context transitive English) To construct by building; to set up 3 (context transitive English) To raise spiritually; to lift up; to elevate morally. 4 (context transitive obsolete English) To lift and take up. 5 (context transitive English) To bring up to maturity, as offspring; to educate; to instruct; to foster. 6 (context transitive English) To breed and raise; as, to rear cattle (cattle-rearing). 7 (context transitive obsolete English) To rouse; to strip up. 8 (context intransitive English) To rise up on the hind legs, as a bolting horse. Etymology 2

alt. 1 (context transitive English) To move; stir. 2 (context transitive of geese English) To carve. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To move; stir. 2 (context transitive of geese English) To carve. Etymology 3

  1. 1 (context now chiefly dialectal English) (context of eggs English) underdone; nearly raw. 2 (context chiefly US English) (context of meats English) rare. alt. 1 (context now chiefly dialectal English) (context of eggs English) underdone; nearly raw. 2 (context chiefly US English) (context of meats English) rare. Etymology 4

    a. Being behind, or in the hindmost part; hindmost; as, the rear rank of a company. adv. (context British dialect English) early; soon n. 1 The back or hindmost part; that which is behind, or last on order; - opposed to front. 2 (context military English) Specifically, the part of an army or fleet which comes last, or is stationed behind the rest. 3 (context anatomy English) The buttocks, a creature's bottom v

  2. 1 To place in the rear; to secure the rear of. 2 (context transitive vulgar British English) To sodomize (gloss: perform anal sex)

WordNet

rear

  1. n. the back of a military formation or procession; "infantrymen were in the rear" [ant: head]

  2. the side of an object that is opposite its front; "his room was toward the rear of the hotel" [syn: backside, back end] [ant: front]

  3. the part of something that is furthest from the normal viewer; "he stood at the back of the stage"; "it was hidden in the rear of the store" [syn: back] [ant: front]

  4. the fleshy part of the human body that you sit on; "he deserves a good kick in the butt"; "are you going to sit on your fanny and do nothing?" [syn: buttocks, nates, arse, butt, backside, bum, buns, can, fundament, hindquarters, hind end, keister, posterior, prat, rear end, rump, stern, seat, tail, tail end, tooshie, tush, bottom, behind, derriere, fanny, ass]

  5. the side that goes last or is not normally seen; "he wrote the date on the back of the photograph" [syn: back] [ant: front]

rear

adj. located in or toward the back or rear; "the chair's rear legs"; "the rear door of the plane"; "on the rearward side" [syn: rear(a), rearward(a)]

rear

  1. v. stand up on the hind legs, of quadrupeds; "The horse reared in terror" [syn: rise up]

  2. bring up; "raise a family"; "bring up children" [syn: raise, bring up, nurture, parent]

  3. rise up; "The building rose before them" [syn: rise, lift]

  4. cause to rise up [syn: erect]

  5. construct, build, or erect; "Raise a barn" [syn: raise, erect, set up, put up] [ant: level]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

rear

"hindmost part," c.1600, abstracted from rerewarde "rear guard, hindmost part of an army or fleet" (mid-14c.), from Anglo-French rerewarde, Old French rieregarde, from Old French adverb riere "behind" (from Latin retro "back, behind;" see retro-) + Old French garde (see guard (n.)). Or the word may be a shortened form of arrear (see arrears).\n

\nAs a euphemism for "buttocks" it is attested from 1796. Rear admiral is first attested 1580s, apparently so called from ranking "behind" an admiral proper. Rear-view (mirror) is recorded from 1926.

rear

Old English ræran "to raise, build up, create, set on end; arouse, excite, stir up," from Proto-Germanic *raizijanau "to raise," causative of *risanan "to rise" (see raise (v.)). Meaning "bring into being, bring up" (as a child) is recorded from early 15c.; that of "raise up on the hind legs" is first recorded late 14c. Related: Reared; rearing.

rear

c.1300, from Old French rere (see rear (n.)).\n

rear

"attack in the rear," 17c., from rear (n.).

Wikipedia

Rear

Rear may refer to:

Rear (military)

In military parlance, the rear is the part of concentration of military forces that is farthest from the enemy (compare its antonym, the front). The rear typically contains all elements of the force necessary to support combat forces - food, medical supplies and substantial shelters, planners and command headquarters.

Usage examples of "rear".

The two end posts directly in the rear of the front corner posts, should be 3 feet back from them, and on a line to accommodate the pitch of the roof from the front to the rear.

These several apartments are accommodated with doors, which open into separate yards on the sides and in rear, or a large one for the entire family, as may be desired.

If farther attachments be required for the accommodation of out-building conveniences, they may be continued indefinitely in the rear.

Silhouetted against the rising sun was the large moon-bounce antenna on the rear deck, pointing straight up as if praying.

The ball entered the abdomen two inches above the crest of the right ilium, a little to the rear of the anterior superior spinous process, and took a downward and forward course.

Rear Admiral Frank Jack Fletcher, was assigned Jaluit and Mili in the southern Marshalls and Makin in the northern Gilberts.

Huddled in the rear seat of the autorickshaws with Deepti, I wore a smog mask and goggles to protect my delicate eye make-up.

In its centre reared a crimson phallus, outlined in blue ink, ballocks dangling beneath, inscribed with the initials G A.

He reared his horse atop the bridge and violently heaved first one set of bags, then the other, over the crumbling stone balustrade to the downstream side.

As the passengers left the shuttle by the rear exit, a dozen Katyl arrived, riding bareback on large, ponderous animals.

In the rear came Lady Blandish and the baronet, conversing on the calm summit of success.

Again the basto bellowed, and a quick backward glance revealed the mighty creature in the trail only a few paces in my rear.

Under the front seats will be a compartment for more batteries, and there will be a third place under the rear seats, where I will also carry spare wheels and a repair kit.

On ahead the lanthorn-bearer, with arched spine and shaking knees, dragging shuffling footsteps along the corridor, then the corporal with two of his soldiers, then Heron closely followed by de Batz, and finally two more soldiers bringing up the rear.

There was still time to run away from this place bedizened front and rear with the scarlet symbol of the Reparationists.