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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

reap

verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
reap rewards (=get them)
▪ She is now reaping the rewards of all her hard work.
reap the benefits (=enjoy the advantages of something you have worked hard to get)
▪ He was looking forward to reaping the benefits of all his hard work.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
advantage
▪ In Figure 2.1 the case of reaping comparative advantage is examined.
▪ The key to minimizing the disadvantages and reaping the advantages of communications over the telephone is the way you behave.
benefit
▪ All this has happened in the country that was first to reap the benefits of radical reform.
▪ First, to be sure, some reap material benefit from inflation.
▪ Let's reap the benefits of a service that is at least 30% better.
▪ So he reaps the benefits privately and shares the costs publicly.
▪ The Eastern Bloc has been transformed into a gigantic Enterprise Zone for western capitalists eager to reap the benefits of suppressed consumerism.
▪ Cities in the county generate most of the sales-tax revenue, yet the county reaps the greatest benefit, he added.
▪ The intended budget of £5 million could reap benefits in a city where tourist revenue is becoming a principal source of wealth.
▪ With a minimal amount of solid rewriting, you can reap some surprising benefits.
company
▪ One way or another these companies intend to reap a return on their investment.
▪ And the unhappy customer base stayed loyal in enormous numbers so that the company is now reaping the benefit.
fruit
▪ In other words, capitalists must prosper if there is to be progress and landlords can not help reaping its fruits.
harvest
▪ In the spring you reap the harvest - or not as the case might be.
▪ And with his prosthetic hand, Harrelson reaps a harvest of bad sight gags.
▪ In the past few years dedicated search projects in the United States have reaped a harvest of the skies.
▪ The gaoler, however, reaped a rich harvest, charging his clients for food, ale, even water.
▪ I know we have the right team for 1992 so let's reap the harvest that is due to us.
▪ He was reaping the harvest he had sown.
profit
▪ There is nothing so admirable as a man who applies his knowledge with forceful direction and from his efficiency reaps a profit.
▪ Several predicted that they will be reap higher yields and profits while saving their soil.
▪ Cricket: Red rose blooms in business David Hopps on how Lancashire reaped record profits.
▪ Hospitals can reap handsome profits that way.
▪ Her landlord plans to reap big profits housing spectators.
▪ And she has been criticized for reaping huge profits in commodities trading.
reward
▪ He did not commit suicide because he had no patent and had reaped no rewards.
▪ In a defined benefit plan, therefore, you bear the investment risk; however, you also reap the investment rewards.
▪ In this new phase, many couples reap the rewards of all their efforts of the preceding years.
▪ Near the end of 1972, both Park and Kim reaped some personal rewards from their headline-making interaction.
▪ On the contrary, even before the war ended, the property-owners began to reap their reward.
▪ The student who works harder reaps many rewards and is thus encouraged to continue good efforts.
▪ But women aren't the only ones to reap the rewards of such praise.
▪ Gainsharing signaled a new way of reaping the rewards of performance.
scale
▪ There would also be stimulation of investment to reap economies of scale, and to rationalise production and distribution systems.
▪ Such a huge number of tiny producers has prevented the beef industry from reaping economies of scale.
▪ It is also normally assumed that there is a perfectly competitive market structure and no potential to reap economies of scale.
▪ Strong criticisms are also voiced about the benefits to be reaped from economies of scale.
■ VERB
sow
▪ Earth, rivers, rain, sowing and reaping all form part of an everyday living process.
▪ Of what may come hereafter For men who sow to reap.
▪ A bit of patience will not go amiss in this area either: what one sows another reaps.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
reap a harvest
▪ And with his prosthetic hand, Harrelson reaps a harvest of bad sight gags.
▪ In the past few years dedicated search projects in the United States have reaped a harvest of the skies.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But it was Margaret Thatcher who reaped all the benefits.
▪ Men and women and children with lives of their own would be waking to reap their own dear sorrows.
▪ Note that this is only half the apparent pay advantage the average woman would reap from being paid like a man.
▪ On the contrary, even before the war ended, the property-owners began to reap their reward.
▪ Several predicted that they will be reap higher yields and profits while saving their soil.
▪ Siemens also has used the lessons learned in its apprenticeship programs to reap much broader cost savings.
▪ The plan is provocative, but it is not reaping fulfilling results this week.
▪ The team reaps only ridicule or, on a good day, apathy.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Reap

Reap \Reap\ (r[=e]p), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Reaped (r[=e]pt); p. pr. & vb. n. Reaping.] [OE. repen, AS. r[=i]pan to seize, reap; cf. D. rapen to glean, reap, G. raufen to pluck, Goth. raupjan, or E. ripe.]

  1. To cut with a sickle, scythe, or reaping machine, as grain; to gather, as a harvest, by cutting.

    When ye reap the harvest of your land, thou shalt not wholly reap the corners of thy field.
    --Lev. xix. 9.

  2. To gather; to obtain; to receive as a reward or harvest, or as the fruit of labor or of works; -- in a good or a bad sense; as, to reap a benefit from exertions.

    Why do I humble thus myself, and, suing For peace, reap nothing but repulse and hate?
    --Milton.

  3. To clear of a crop by reaping; as, to reap a field.

  4. To deprive of the beard; to shave. [R.]
    --Shak.

    Reaping hook, an implement having a hook-shaped blade, used in reaping; a sickle; -- in a specific sense, distinguished from a sickle by a blade keen instead of serrated.

Reap

Reap \Reap\, v. i. To perform the act or operation of reaping; to gather a harvest.

They that sow in tears shall reap in joy.
--Ps. cxxvi. 5.

Reap

Reap \Reap\, n. [Cf. AS. r[=i]p harvest. See Reap, v.] A bundle of grain; a handful of grain laid down by the reaper as it is cut. [Obs. or Prov. Eng.]
--Wright.

Wikipedia

Reap

Reap may refer to:

  • Harvest, the process of gathering mature crops from the field

REAP may refer to:

  • Reserve Educational Assistance Program, Chapter 1607 (G.I. Bill of Rights), a Department of Defense education benefit program
  • Re-Engineering Assessment Practices, one of six projects funded under the Scottish Funding Council's E-learning Transformation Programme
  • Resource and Energy Analysis Programme, a specialist programme of the Stockholm Environment Institute
  • Rounding Errors in Algebraic Processes, a mathematical book by James H. Wilkinson published in 1963

REAP (book)

  1. redirect James H. Wilkinson#REAP

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Category:1963 books Category:Mathematics books

Wiktionary

reap

n. A bundle of grain; a handful of grain laid down by the reaper as it is cut. vb. 1 To cut with a sickle, scythe, or reaping machine, as grain; to gather, as a harvest, by cutting. 2 To gather; to obtain; to receive as a reward or harvest, or as the fruit of labor or of works, in a good or a bad sense. 3 (context computer science English) To terminate a child process that has previously exited, thereby removing it from the process table. 4 (context obsolete English) To deprive of the beard; to shave.

WordNet

reap

  1. v. gather, as of natural products; "harvest the grapes" [syn: harvest, glean]

  2. get or derive; "He drew great benefits from his membership in the association" [syn: draw]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

reap

"to cut grain with a hook or sickle," Old English reopan, Mercian form of ripan "to reap," related to Old English ripe "ripe" (see ripe). Related: Reaped; reaping.

Usage examples of "reap".

Lionel assuring him nothing was so good for them, ran on with so many farrier words and phrases of the benefit they would reap from such light evening exercise, that, persuaded he was master of the subject, Mr.

The world is destined to reap much one day from the exuberant fertility of this marshland of the South.

England would reap from his Protectorship, to deprive my countrymen of such a blessing, if he consent to bestow it on them.

Jesse was one of the few who had called attention to the imbalance, and finally, eyeing the wealth reaped by the wily Hoskanners, the other nobles agitated for a piece of the action.

Not too high by any means in the light of what has been accomplished in 73 years, but there was a long row to hoe first, and few of the pioneers reaped the prizes.

Obliged to rise before daybreak, by turns shop-boy, clerk, and laborer, he was made to bear alone all the work of a trade of which his master reaped all the profits.

Whoever eats the bread that another has reaped and kneaded, is under an obligation to his brother, and cannot say he owes him nothing in return.

God had marked out my road--a ground where I had reaped the harvest I had sown.

Blaise and Denis, the twins, now already fourteen years of age, reaped prize after prize at school, putting their younger brother, Ambroise, slightly to shame, for his quick and ingenious mind was often busy with other matters than his lessons.

All the food needed for a great nation will be reaped there when cultivation is practised with a little courage and a little science, for it is still a virgin kingdom such as the good river created it, thousands of years ago.

I now reaped the reward of my wisdom in providing one article which is not mentioned in any book of Alpine adventure but this.

You sow, you that for long have reaped disdain, Lie barren at the doorway of the brain, Let stout contention drive deep furrows, blood Moisten, and make new channels of its flood!

For this is but the natural harvest reaped From labors such as mine when blessed by God.

Yea, were it otherwise--had you not reaped The fruit of your own works, she had not suffered.

He has the sugar of his tea spread out on the window sill, and is reaping quite a harvest of flies.