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Ream

Ream may refer to:

  • Paper ream, unit of 500 sheets of paper
  • Ream (surname)
  • Ream (e-mail client), a textual e-mail client
  • Reamer, tool used to widen a hole
  • Ream, West Virginia
  • Ream, the name of Rama in the Khmer version of the Ramayana, the Reamker
  • Ream National Park, a national park in Cambodia
  • Ream Naval Base, Sihanoukville, Cambodia

Ream (surname)

Ream is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

  • Dwight Ream (1892–1954), American football and basketball coach
  • Norman B. Ream (1844-1915), American businessman.
  • Roger Ream (born 1954), President of The Fund for American Studies
  • Tim Ream (born 1987), American soccer player
  • Vinnie Ream or Lavinia Ellen Ream Hoxie (1847–1914), American sculptor

Ream (email client)

Ream is a textual, screen-based email client developed by Paul Dourish at the Center for Speech Technology Research at the University of Edinburgh. Initially developed in 1986, it was one of the standard email clients for the university and was in use throughout the campus for around ten years. Freely available on the internet, it was ported to a large number of UNIX-based operating systems including OSF/1, BSD 2.10, Unicos, Ultrix, HP-UX, and Dynix, and was made compatible with email infrastructures based on sendmail, MMDF, and PP.

Its more advanced features include an automatic mechanism for determining where messages should be saved (making it extremely fast to process incoming messages), a zero-cost-override input feature derived from Interlisp, stackable message selection based on regular expressions, a fast regular expression engine with a tiny footprint, and tight integration with external text editors, allowing users to rely on their favourite tools for composing and editing text.

Ream was developed at around the same time as Elm, and is similar in its broad interface approach.

Ream was designed in an era of multi-user minicomputer and mainframe systems, before protocols such as POP and IMAP were widely deployed. Similarly, it predated widespread use of MIME encoding, necessary to support file attachments. Lack of support for these features caused use of ream to dwindle in the late 1990s.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Ream

Ream \Ream\ (r[=e]m), n. [AS. re['a]m, akin to G. rahm.] Cream; also, the cream or froth on ale. [Scot.]

Ream

Ream \Ream\, v. i. To cream; to mantle. [Scot.]

A huge pewter measuring pot which, in the language of the hostess, reamed with excellent claret.
--Sir W. Scott.

Ream

Ream \Ream\, v. t. [Cf. Reim.] To stretch out; to draw out into thongs, threads, or filaments.

Ream

Ream \Ream\, n. [OE. reme, OF. rayme, F. rame (cf. Sp. resma), fr. Ar. rizma a bundle, especially of paper.] A bundle, package, or quantity of paper, usually consisting of twenty quires or 480 sheets.

Printer's ream, twenty-one and a half quires. [Eng.] A common practice is now to count five hundred sheets to the ream.
--Knight.

Ream

Ream \Ream\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Reamed (r[=e]md); p. pr. & vb. n. Reaming.] [Cf. G. r["a]umen to remove, to clear away, fr. raum room. See Room.] To bevel out, as the mouth of a hole in wood or metal; in modern usage, to enlarge or dress out, as a hole, with a reamer.

Wiktionary

ream

Etymology 1 alt. (context UK dialectal Northern England Scotland English) cream; also, the creamlike froth on ale or other liquor; froth or foam in general. n. (context UK dialectal Northern England Scotland English) cream; also, the creamlike froth on ale or other liquor; froth or foam in general. vb. (context UK dialectal Northern England Scotland English) To cream; mantle; foam; froth. Etymology 2

alt. 1 To enlarge a hole, especially using a reamer; to bore a hole wider. 2 To shape or form, especially using a reamer. 3 To remove (material) by reaming. 4 To remove burrs and debris from a freshly bored hole. 5 (context slang English) To yell at or berate. 6 (context slang vulgar English) To sexually penetrate in a rough and painful way, by analogy with definition 1. vb. 1 To enlarge a hole, especially using a reamer; to bore a hole wider. 2 To shape or form, especially using a reamer. 3 To remove (material) by reaming. 4 To remove burrs and debris from a freshly bored hole. 5 (context slang English) To yell at or berate. 6 (context slang vulgar English) To sexually penetrate in a rough and painful way, by analogy with definition 1. Etymology 3

alt. 1 A bundle, package, or quantity of paper, nowadays usually containing 500 sheets. 2 (lb en chiefly in the plural) An abstract large amount of something. n. 1 A bundle, package, or quantity of paper, nowadays usually containing 500 sheets. 2 (lb en chiefly in the plural) An abstract large amount of something.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

ream

measure of paper, mid-14c., from Old French reyme, from Spanish resma, from Arabic rizmah "bundle" (of paper), from rasama "collect into a bundle." The Moors brought manufacture of cotton paper to Spain.\n

\nEarly variant rym (late 15c.) suggests a Dutch influence (compare Dutch riem), probably borrowed from Spanish during the time of Hapsburg control of Holland. For ordinary writing paper, 20 quires of 24 sheets each, or 480 sheets; often 500 or more to allow for waste; slightly different numbers for drawing or printing paper.

ream

"to enlarge a hole," 1815, probably a southwest England dialectal survival from Middle English reme "to make room, open up," from Old English ryman "widen, extend, enlarge," from Proto-Germanic *rumijan (cognates: Old Saxon rumian, Old Norse ryma, Old Frisian rema, Old High German rumen "to make room, widen"), from *rumaz "spacious" (see room (n.)). Slang meaning "to cheat, swindle" first recorded 1914; anal sex sense is from 1942. To ream (someone) out "scold, reprimand" is recorded from 1950.

ream

"cream" (obsolete), Old English ream, from Proto-Germanic *raumoz (cognates: Middle Dutch and Dutch room, German Rahm), of uncertain origin.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

ream

noun
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Both sides used reams of statistical data to argue for the superiority of their performance.
▪ Bowing out seems unlikely, but the stadium groundbreaking is reams of paperwork away.
▪ I write reams of dry prose with appropriately technical language and what my colleagues consider scientific consequence.
▪ It certainly makes a refreshing change from reams of text menus.
▪ M.Jean Leblanc of his staff went to considerable lengths to both provide and help interpret various policy papers and reams of data.
▪ Mostly you get reams of plain text.
▪ Process control has reams of output data that need organizing and interpreting.
▪ There were such reams of documents that it simply wasn't possible to read them all.
WordNet

ream

  1. n. a large quantity of written matter; "he wrote reams and reams"

  2. a quantity of paper; 480 or 500 sheets; one ream equals 20 quires

  3. v. squeeze the juice out (of a fruit) with a reamer; "ream oranges"

  4. remove by making a hole with a reamer; "ream paper"

  5. enlarge with a reamer; "ream a hole"

Usage examples of "ream".

The actinic flare of outraged nerves reamed her through, then became stripped of meaning by the bared lash of her will.

During that same period, the publicity department continued to churn out ream after ream of material about the genius of Lester Barnstorm, the sole creator of The Solar Ballet, thus creating and maintaining a vivid public perception that Barnstorm, the great man, was being unfairly and maliciously attacked by a disgruntled ex-employee.

When I was thirteen I came down with mononucleosis, and for two months, listless and febrile, my throat reamed with barbed wire, I lived on a diet of chicken soup, hot Bovril, and pulp fiction.

The Starfleet officers knew already about the dangerously tight restrictions on shipboard navigational and defensive systems, but what with one thing and another involved in bringing the ship back from near-leave to fully operational status, none of those aboard Enterprise had been able to find the time to wade through reams of impenetrable officialese and learn what else was involved in General Order 12.

America, but the Parlementaire orator was able to represent it as an imposition that would strike the great and humble alike, festooning tradesmen, booksellers, shopkeepers and guildsmen in reams of paper, and which would furnish yet another pretext for the heavy hand of government to press on the shoulder of defenseless citizens.

So he reamed and plunged until upon reaching a shuddering climax the sperm imprisoned in his testicles raced up his urethra into her vagina.

With those thoughts in her mind, as he reamed and savaged her, drawing inexorably towards his climax, she felt herself becoming increasingly aroused.

He reamed and rodded into her, whipping her body into a frantic frenzy of desire.

With the same reckless abandon he had first begun in mock-rape, he reamed the flowering folds of her pussy.

Either way, he was going to get his ass reamed, but at least a proctologist would wear gloves and try to be gentle.

He just shook his head, halfheartedly reamed me out, and then left us alone.

Her head ached, and her veins felt as if their delicate insides had been systematically reamed and scalded.

Dakar suggested, reamed already by cramps that made beheading seem merciful by comparison.

With a thrusting movement, he added the long digit to the one Jonah had already reamed into her, and hardened his jaw at the feel of those sweet, strong muscles, so soft and slick, gripping him so perfectly.

While she fought an instinctive rush of shame, he began to circle her like a drill instructor reaming out a particularly stupid cadet.