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The Collaborative International Dictionary

Ran

Ran \Ran\, n. (Naut.) Yarns coiled on a spun-yarn winch.

Ran

Ran \Ran\ (r[a^]n), imp. of Run.

Ran

Ran \Ran\, n. [AS. r[=a]n.] Open robbery. [Obs.]
--Lambarde.

Ran

Run \Run\, v. i. [imp. Ranor Run; p. p. Run; p. pr. & vb. n. Running.] [OE. rinnen, rennen (imp. ran, p. p. runnen, ronnen). AS. rinnan to flow (imp. ran, p. p. gerunnen), and iernan, irnan, to run (imp. orn, arn, earn, p. p. urnen); akin to D. runnen, rennen, OS. & OHG. rinnan, G. rinnen, rennen, Icel. renna, rinna, Sw. rinna, r["a]nna, Dan. rinde, rende, Goth. rinnan, and perh. to L. oriri to rise, Gr. ? to stir up, rouse, Skr. ? (cf. Origin), or perh. to L. rivus brook (cf. Rival). [root]1

  1. Cf. Ember, a., Rennet.] 1. To move, proceed, advance, pass, go, come, etc., swiftly, smoothly, or with quick action; -- said of things animate or inanimate. Hence, to flow, glide, or roll onward, as a stream, a snake, a wagon, etc.; to move by quicker action than in walking, as a person, a horse, a dog. Specifically:

  2. Of voluntary or personal action:

    1. To go swiftly; to pass at a swift pace; to hasten.

      ``Ha, ha, the fox!'' and after him they ran.
      --Chaucer.

    2. To flee, as from fear or danger.

      As from a bear a man would run for life.
      --Shak.

    3. To steal off; to depart secretly.

    4. To contend in a race; hence, to enter into a contest; to become a candidate; as, to run for Congress.

      Know ye not that they which run in a race run all, but one receiveth the prize? So run, that ye may obtain.
      --1 Cor. ix. 24.

    5. To pass from one state or condition to another; to come into a certain condition; -- often with in or into; as, to run into evil practices; to run in debt.

      Have I not cause to rave and beat my breast, to rend my heart with grief and run distracted?
      --Addison.

    6. To exert continuous activity; to proceed; as, to run through life; to run in a circle.

    7. To pass or go quickly in thought or conversation; as, to run from one subject to another.

      Virgil, in his first Georgic, has run into a set of precepts foreign to his subject.
      --Addison.

    8. To discuss; to continue to think or speak about something; -- with on.

    9. To make numerous drafts or demands for payment, as upon a bank; -- with on.

    10. To creep, as serpents.

  3. Of involuntary motion:

    1. To flow, as a liquid; to ascend or descend; to course; as, rivers run to the sea; sap runs up in the spring; her blood ran cold.

    2. To proceed along a surface; to extend; to spread.

      The fire ran along upon the ground.
      --Ex. ix. 23.

    3. To become fluid; to melt; to fuse.

      As wax dissolves, as ice begins to run.
      --Addison.

      Sussex iron ores run freely in the fire.
      --Woodward.

    4. To turn, as a wheel; to revolve on an axis or pivot; as, a wheel runs swiftly round.

    5. To travel; to make progress; to be moved by mechanical means; to go; as, the steamboat runs regularly to Albany; the train runs to Chicago.

    6. To extend; to reach; as, the road runs from Philadelphia to New York; the memory of man runneth not to the contrary.

      She saw with joy the line immortal run, Each sire impressed, and glaring in his son.
      --Pope.

    7. To go back and forth from place to place; to ply; as, the stage runs between the hotel and the station.

    8. To make progress; to proceed; to pass.

      As fast as our time runs, we should be very glad in most part of our lives that it ran much faster.
      --Addison.

    9. To continue in operation; to be kept in action or motion; as, this engine runs night and day; the mill runs six days in the week.

      When we desire anything, our minds run wholly on the good circumstances of it; when it is obtained, our minds run wholly on the bad ones.
      --Swift.

    10. To have a course or direction; as, a line runs east and west.

      Where the generally allowed practice runs counter to it.
      --Locke.

      Little is the wisdom, where the flight So runs against all reason.
      --Shak.

    11. To be in form thus, as a combination of words.

      The king's ordinary style runneth, ``Our sovereign lord the king.''
      --Bp. Sanderson.

    12. To be popularly known; to be generally received.

      Men gave them their own names, by which they run a great while in Rome.
      --Sir W. Temple.

      Neither was he ignorant what report ran of himself.
      --Knolles.

    13. To have growth or development; as, boys and girls run up rapidly.

      If the richness of the ground cause turnips to run to leaves.
      --Mortimer.

    14. To tend, as to an effect or consequence; to incline.

      A man's nature runs either to herbs or weeds.
      --Bacon.

      Temperate climates run into moderate governments.
      --Swift.

    15. To spread and blend together; to unite; as, colors run in washing.

      In the middle of a rainbow the colors are . . . distinguished, but near the borders they run into one another.
      --I. Watts.

    16. To have a legal course; to be attached; to continue in force, effect, or operation; to follow; to go in company; as, certain covenants run with the land.

      Customs run only upon our goods imported or exported, and that but once for all; whereas interest runs as well upon our ships as goods, and must be yearly paid.
      --Sir J. Child.

    17. To continue without falling due; to hold good; as, a note has thirty days to run.

    18. To discharge pus or other matter; as, an ulcer runs.

    19. To be played on the stage a number of successive days or nights; as, the piece ran for six months.

    20. (Naut.) To sail before the wind, in distinction from reaching or sailing closehauled; -- said of vessels.

  4. Specifically, of a horse: To move rapidly in a gait in which each leg acts in turn as a propeller and a supporter, and in which for an instant all the limbs are gathered in the air under the body.
    --Stillman (The Horse in Motion).

  5. (Athletics) To move rapidly by springing steps so that there is an instant in each step when neither foot touches the ground; -- so distinguished from walking in athletic competition. As things run, according to the usual order, conditions, quality, etc.; on the average; without selection or specification. To let run (Naut.), to allow to pass or move freely; to slacken or loosen. To run after, to pursue or follow; to search for; to endeavor to find or obtain; as, to run after similes. --Locke. To run away, to flee; to escape; to elope; to run without control or guidance. To run away with.

    1. To convey away hurriedly; to accompany in escape or elopement.

    2. To drag rapidly and with violence; as, a horse runs away with a carriage. To run down.

      1. To cease to work or operate on account of the exhaustion of the motive power; -- said of clocks, watches, etc.

      2. To decline in condition; as, to run down in health. To run down a coast, to sail along it. To run for an office, to stand as a candidate for an office. To run in or To run into.

        1. To enter; to step in.

        2. To come in collision with. To run into To meet, by chance; as, I ran into my brother at the grocery store. To run in trust, to run in debt; to get credit. [Obs.] To run in with.

          1. To close; to comply; to agree with. [R.]
            --T. Baker.

          2. (Naut.) To make toward; to near; to sail close to; as, to run in with the land. To run mad, To run mad after or To run mad on. See under Mad. To run on.

            1. To be continued; as, their accounts had run on for a year or two without a settlement.

            2. To talk incessantly.

    3. To continue a course.

    4. To press with jokes or ridicule; to abuse with sarcasm; to bear hard on.

    5. (Print.) To be continued in the same lines, without making a break or beginning a new paragraph. To run out.

      1. To come to an end; to expire; as, the lease runs out at Michaelmas.

      2. To extend; to spread. ``Insectile animals . . . run all out into legs.''
        --Hammond.

      3. To expatiate; as, to run out into beautiful digressions.

      4. To be wasted or exhausted; to become poor; to become extinct; as, an estate managed without economy will soon run out. And had her stock been less, no doubt She must have long ago run out. --Dryden. To run over.

        1. To overflow; as, a cup runs over, or the liquor runs over.

        2. To go over, examine, or rehearse cursorily.

        3. To ride or drive over; as, to run over a child. To run riot, to go to excess. To run through.

          1. To go through hastily; as to run through a book.

          2. To spend wastefully; as, to run through an estate. To run to seed, to expend or exhaust vitality in producing seed, as a plant; figuratively and colloquially, to cease growing; to lose vital force, as the body or mind. To run up, to rise; to swell; to grow; to increase; as, accounts of goods credited run up very fast. But these, having been untrimmed for many years, had run up into great bushes, or rather dwarf trees. --Sir W. Scott. To run with.

            1. To be drenched with, so that streams flow; as, the streets ran with blood.

            2. To flow while charged with some foreign substance. ``Its rivers ran with gold.''
              --J. H. Newman.

WordNet

run

  1. n. a score in baseball made by a runner touching all four bases safely; "the Yankees scored 3 runs in the bottom of the 9th"; "their first tally came in the 3rd inning" [syn: tally]

  2. the act of testing something; "in the experimental trials the amount of carbon was measured separately"; "he called each flip of the coin a new trial" [syn: test, trial]

  3. a race run on foot; "she broke the record for the half-mile run" [syn: footrace, foot race]

  4. an unbroken series of events; "had a streak of bad luck"; "Nicklaus had a run of birdies" [syn: streak]

  5. (American football) a play in which a player runs with the ball; "the defensive line braced to stop the run"; "the coach put great emphasis on running" [syn: running, running play, running game]

  6. a regular trip; "the ship made its run in record time"

  7. the act of running; traveling on foot at a fast pace; "he broke into a run"; "his daily run keeps him fit" [syn: running]

  8. the continuous period of time during which something (a machine or a factory) operates or continues in operation; "the assembly line was on a 12-hour run"

  9. unrestricted freedom to use; "he has the run of the house"

  10. the production achieved during a continuous period of operation (of a machine or factory etc.); "a daily run of 100,000 gallons of paint"

  11. a small stream [syn: rivulet, rill, runnel, streamlet]

  12. a race between candidates for elective office; "I managed his campaign for governor"; "he is raising money for a Senate run" [syn: political campaign, campaign]

  13. a row of unravelled stitches; "she got a run in her stocking" [syn: ladder, ravel]

  14. the pouring forth of a fluid [syn: discharge, outpouring]

  15. an unbroken chronological sequence; "the play had a long run on Broadway"; "the team enjoyed a brief run of victories"

  16. a short trip; "take a run into town"

  17. [also: running, ran]

ran

See run

run

  1. v. move fast by using one's feet, with one foot off the ground at any given time; "Don't run--you'll be out of breath"; "The children ran to the store"

  2. flee; take to one's heels; cut and run; "If you see this man, run!"; "The burglars escaped before the police showed up" [syn: scarper, turn tail, lam, run away, hightail it, bunk, head for the hills, take to the woods, escape, fly the coop, break away]

  3. stretch out over a distance, space, time, or scope; run or extend between two points or beyond a certain point; "Service runs all the way to Cranbury"; "His knowledge doesn't go very far"; "My memory extends back to my fourth year of life"; "The facts extend beyond a consideration of her personal assets" [syn: go, pass, lead, extend]

  4. direct or control; projects, businesses, etc.; "She is running a relief operation in the Sudan" [syn: operate]

  5. have a particular form; "the story or argument runs as follows"; "as the saying goes..." [syn: go]

  6. move along, of liquids; "Water flowed into the cave"; "the Missouri feeds into the Mississippi" [syn: flow, feed, course]

  7. perform as expected when applied; "The washing machine won't go unless it's plugged in"; "Does this old car still run well?"; "This old radio doesn't work anymore" [syn: function, work, operate, go] [ant: malfunction]

  8. change or be different within limits; "Estimates for the losses in the earthquake range as high as $2 billion"; "Interest rates run from 5 to 10 percent"; "The instruments ranged from tuba to cymbals"; "My students range from very bright to dull" [syn: range]

  9. run, stand, or compete for an office or a position; "Who's running for treasurer this year?" [syn: campaign]

  10. cause to emit recorded sounds; "They ran the tapes over and over again"; "Can you play my favorite record?" [syn: play]

  11. move about freely and without restraint, or act as if running around in an uncontrolled way; "who are these people running around in the building?"; "She runs around telling everyone of her troubles"; "let the dogs run free"

  12. have a tendency or disposition to do or be something; be inclined; "She tends to be nervous before her lectures"; "These dresses run small"; "He inclined to corpulence" [syn: tend, be given, lean, incline]

  13. carry out a process or program, as on a computer or a machine; "Run the dishwasher"; "run a new program on the Mac"; "the computer executed the instruction" [syn: execute]

  14. be operating, running or functioning; "The car is still running--turn it off!" [ant: idle]

  15. change from one state to another; "run amok"; "run rogue"; "run riot"

  16. cause to perform; "run a subject"; "run a process"

  17. be affected by; be subjected to; "run a temperature"; "run a risk"

  18. continue to exist; "These stories die hard"; "The legend of Elvis endures" [syn: prevail, persist, die hard, endure]

  19. occur persistently; "Musical talent runs in the family"

  20. include as the content; broadcast or publicize; "We ran the ad three times"; "This paper carries a restaurant review"; "All major networks carried the press conference" [syn: carry]

  21. carry out; "run an errand"

  22. guide or pass over something; "He ran his eyes over her body"; "She ran her fingers along the carved figurine"; "He drew her hair through his fingers" [syn: guide, draw, pass]

  23. cause something to pass or lead somewhere; "Run the wire behind the cabinet" [syn: lead]

  24. make without a miss

  25. deal in illegally, such as arms or liquor [syn: black market]

  26. cause an animal to move fast; "run the dogs"

  27. be diffused; "These dyes and colors are guaranteed not to run" [syn: bleed]

  28. sail before the wind

  29. cover by running; run a certain distance; "She ran 10 miles that day"

  30. extend or continue for a certain period of time; "The film runs 5 hours" [syn: run for]

  31. set animals loose to graze

  32. keep company; "the heifers run with the bulls ot produce offspring" [syn: consort]

  33. run with the ball; in such sports as football

  34. travel rapidly, by any (unspecified) means; "Run to the store!"; "She always runs to Italy, because she has a lover there"

  35. travel a route regularly; "Ships ply the waters near the coast" [syn: ply]

  36. pursue for food or sport (as of wild animals); "Goering often hunted wild boars in Poland"; "The dogs are running deer"; "The Duke hunted in these woods" [syn: hunt, hunt down, track down]

  37. compete in a race; "he is running the Marathon this year"; "let's race and see who gets there first" [syn: race]

  38. progress by being changed; "The speech has to go through several more drafts"; "run through your presentation before the meeting" [syn: move, go]

  39. reduce or cause to be reduced from a solid to a liquid state, usually by heating; "melt butter"; "melt down gold"; "The wax melted in the sun" [syn: melt, melt down]

  40. come unraveled or undone as if by snagging; "Her nylons were running" [syn: ladder]

  41. become undone; "the sweater unraveled" [syn: unravel]

  42. [also: running, ran]

Wikipedia

Ran

Ran, RaN and ran may refer to:

RAN (disambiguation)

Ran (Haganah unit)

Ran was the counter-intelligence service of the Jewish settlement in Mandate Palestine. It was established by Shaul Avigur (Meirov) and Yehuda Arazi (Tannenbaum), the latter a member of the Palestine Police Force. Arazi joined the police on orders from the Haganah, and rose to become a police inspector in the Criminal Investigation Department (CID).

Ran's primary aim was to thwart the intelligence gathering operations of the British, Germans, Italians and Americans.

Ran (song)

is the eighteenth single by Japanese rock band Luna Sea, released on November 13, 2013. It reached number 17 on the Oricon chart and number 24 on Billboards Japan Hot 100.

Ran (surname)

Ran is the Mandarin pinyin romanization of the Chinese surname written in Chinese character. It is romanized Jan in Wade–Giles. Ran is listed 301st in the Song dynasty classic text Hundred Family Surnames. As of 2008, it is the 178th most common surname in China, shared by 670,000 people.

RAN (Indonesian group)

RAN is an Indonesian pop and R&B group from Jakarta. The group consists of Rayi Putra Rahardjo (Rayi), Astono Handoko (Asta) and Anindyo Baskoro (Nino). Currently, the group already releasing four studio albums: For Your Life (2008), Friday (2009), HOP3 (2011) and Hari Baru (2013).

Rán

In Norse mythology, Rán ( Old Norse perhaps "robber") is a goddess associated with the sea. According to Snorri Sturluson's Prose Edda book Skáldskaparmál, in his retelling of the Poetic Edda poem Lokasenna, she is married to Ægir and they have nine daughters together. Snorri also reports that she had a net in which she tried to capture men who ventured out on the sea:

Ran is the name of Ægir's wife, and their daughters are nine, even as we have written before. At this feast all things were self-served, both food and ale, and all implements needful to the feast. Then the Æsir became aware that Rán had that net wherein she was wont to catch all men who go upon the sea.

Her net is also mentioned in Reginsmál and in the Völsunga saga, where she lends it to Loki so that he can capture Andvari.

Ran (film)

is a 1985 Japanese-French jidaigeki epic film directed and co-written by Akira Kurosawa. The film stars Tatsuya Nakadai as Hidetora Ichimonji, an aging Sengoku-era warlord who decides to abdicate as ruler in favor of his three sons. The story is based on legends of the daimyo Mōri Motonari, as well as on the Shakespearean tragedy King Lear.

Ran was Kurosawa's last epic, and has often been cited as amongst his finest achievements. With a budget of $11 million, it was the most expensive Japanese film ever produced up to that time. Ran was released on May 31, 1985 at the Tokyo International Film Festival and on June 1, 1985 in Japan. The film was hailed for its powerful images and use of color— costume designer Emi Wada won an Academy Award for Costume Design for her work on Ran. The distinctive Gustav Mahler–inspired film score, written by Toru Takemitsu, plays in isolation with ambient sound muted.

Ran (gene)

Ran (RAs-related Nuclear protein) also known as GTP-binding nuclear protein Ran is a protein that in humans is encoded by the RAN gene. Ran is a small 25 kDa protein that is involved in transport into and out of the cell nucleus during interphase and also involved in mitosis. It is a member of the Ras superfamily.

Ran is a small G protein that is essential for the translocation of RNA and proteins through the nuclear pore complex. The Ran protein has also been implicated in the control of DNA synthesis and cell cycle progression, as mutations in Ran have been found to disrupt DNA synthesis.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

ran

COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a shudder ran/passed/went through sb
▪ A shudder ran through him at the touch of her fingers.
ran full tilt
▪ She ran full tilt into his arms.
ran headlong into
▪ Mortimer almost ran headlong into a patrol.
ran the gamut (=included all the possibilities between two extremes)
▪ Her feelings that day ran the gamut of emotions .
ran up a...tab
▪ He ran up a $4000 tab in long-distance calls.
ran...marathon
▪ Garcia ran the marathon in just under three hours.
ran...ragged (=made them do a lot of work)
▪ He ran United’s defence ragged .
shiver ran through (=went through)
▪ A shiver ran through me.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And we know all the toast was white -- hey, we ran out of whole wheat and rye and muffins.
▪ His successors never again ran the town, as he did, but they always had a piece of the action.
▪ I ran my jobs over and over again, trying to get them right.
▪ Shadows ran down like rivers from the airy uplands, filling the depths with a gathering chill.
▪ They ran off as fast as their legs would carry them.
▪ Today thousands of commuters were delayed for up to 35 minutes as trains ran behind schedule.
▪ When her funds ran out, she began to beg donations from people in her neighborhood.
Wiktionary

ran

Etymology 1 vb. (en-simple pastrun) Etymology 2

n. (context nautical English) yarn coiled on a spun-yarn winch. Etymology 3

n. (context obsolete English) Open robbery.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

ran

past tense of run (v.), Old English ran.

Usage examples of "ran".

And thou, O sun, who even now must be making haste to saddle thy steeds, and climb the heavens, and see my lady, I pray thee when thou seest her to greet her on my behalf, but be thou certain not to kiss her face when thou seest and greetest her, for then I shall be more envious of thee than thou wert of that fleet ingrate who madest thee to perspire and race across the plains of Thessaly or along the banks of the Peneus, for I do not remember precisely where thou rannest then so envious and enamored.