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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
rally
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a peace rally (=large public meeting in support of peace)
▪ CND organised a massive peace rally in Trafalgar Square attended by over a million people.
a protest rally (=a large outdoor public meeting to protest about something )
▪ A protest rally in the capital was attended by about 400 people.
an election rally (=a public meeting to support a politician or party before an election)
▪ He drove to Paris to address an election rally.
drum up/rally support (=get people’s support by making an effort)
▪ Both sides have been drumming up support through the internet.
pep rally
rallying cry
▪ ‘Land and Liberty’ was the rallying cry of revolutionary Mexico.
rallying point
▪ a rallying point for the struggle against apartheid
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
big
▪ They watched with glee, therefore, the biggest bond market rally in the history of Wall Street.
large
▪ On May 8 Chamlong led another large rally at Democracy Monument, where some demonstrators came close to clashing with riot police.
▪ At the first and largest rally a prominent opposition leader, Vuk Draskovic, called for a campaign of civil disobedience.
late
▪ It was in the railway carriage as Earle had been coming back from the late night rally in the North West.
▪ A late rally dragged the index up to close at 18,560, still off more than 1,000 on the week.
▪ Paris: A late rally helped shares recover.
mass
▪ On Nov. 22 more than 150,000 people in Lomé had held a mass rally in support of the strike.
▪ There were no mass rallies attended by thousands of the enthusiastic or the curious.
▪ Opposition demonstration A mass rally organized by 12 opposition groups was held in Lomé, the capital, on Feb. 9.
▪ It can cover anything from giving a church sermon to holding a mass rally.
▪ On 22 April there was a mass rally at the Albert Hall where Mosley addressed an audience of 10,000 supporters.
▪ The mass rally now became a powerful expression of national feeling.
political
▪ Occasionally there were special programmes: a political rally.
▪ What percentage have participated in political rallies?
▪ But he has already tried to curb political opposition, suspending both houses of parliament and banning political rallies.
▪ They stopped asking him to come out to their political rallies.
▪ She met Sebastian at a political rally.
▪ But my first attendance at a political rally changed my childhood habits right away, at least briefly.
▪ The ban on political rallies was lifted on April 8.
▪ In these days when a political rally consists of three people watching television, it's rather refreshing.
public
▪ This has sent hundreds of murderers and drug dealers to firing squads after being paraded at public rallies.
▪ Neither law firm outings nor public protests and rallies were quite his style, in any case.
▪ The protest walk will precede a public rally planned for the village on Saturday, September 18.
▪ The local County Manager, Michael O'Malley, issued an edict to planning officials not to attend public rallies.
■ NOUN
driver
▪ Former rally driver Jean Denton is battling to reduce red tape and bureaucratic burdens on small firms and start-ups.
▪ An auto rally driver with a penchant for crashing cars, Marko Milosevic owns a discotheque and several cafes in the town.
▪ He knows how to corner without disaster and is quite a rally driver on the sharp bends.
market
▪ The other inhibition is more pragmatic: fear of unlimited losses on short positions that might result from a sudden market rally.
▪ But it was not enough to prompt a significant market rally.
▪ The early gains from the stock market rally begot a feeling of invincibility.
▪ The bond market rally races into its third week.
▪ They watched with glee, therefore, the biggest bond market rally in the history of Wall Street.
■ VERB
address
▪ Violence marked the funeral of Lalith Athulathmudali, a Sri Lankan opposition leader who was shot dead while addressing a rally.
▪ He was assassinated the day after addressing a rally of striking sanitation workers in Memphis.
▪ Trade unionist and the Cardinal Archbishop of Palermo addressed the rally.
▪ His last big public appearance was on Dec. 24, when he addressed a rally of his supporters in Belgrade.
▪ In 1951 and 1952 he continued to act as the Rassemblement's main spokesman, addressing rallies and holding press conferences.
attend
▪ Most of those attending the rally Sunday, however, were Phoenix-area veterans and friends.
▪ It was from here, in 1959, that she effectively attended an Oswald Mosley rally.
▪ They have also been invited to attend a rally to commemorate the 22 de Enero.
▪ Its supporters may be nervous about attending its rallies, and the movement itself is divided.
▪ Feminists threw their weight behind Mrs Killea's campaign, and hundreds of students attended a rally in support of abortion rights.
▪ He was attending a Liberal rally in the city.
▪ The local County Manager, Michael O'Malley, issued an edict to planning officials not to attend public rallies.
hold
▪ On Nov. 22 more than 150,000 people in Lomé had held a mass rally in support of the strike.
▪ In the streets, opponents of Proposition 187 have held mass rallies and student walkouts.
▪ And in Britain the Countryside Alliance holds a protest rally.
▪ It would have been a good place to hold a torchlight rally.
▪ It can cover anything from giving a church sermon to holding a mass rally.
▪ Several hundred protesters had gathered in the city, and held a rally earlier in the day.
lead
▪ Molly led a rally near Detroit, Michigan.
organize
▪ The opposition defied curfews and continued to organize rallies and strikes to press for Ershad's resignation.
plan
▪ The organisers are planning a rally in February.
▪ On Saturday, he planned a rally amongst the party faithful in his constituency to wave the nag.
spark
▪ The action sparked a rally in bond prices and the Dow Jones closed 14.96 up at 2597.13..
▪ On Wall Street, across-the-board buying in the oil sector sparked a rally.
tell
▪ Djindjic told a rally at Republic Square that Milosevic was trying to lumber the police with responsibility for failed government policy.
win
▪ After two blank hands at 7-6, Martin won three rallies in a row.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A 30-point rally in the fourth quarter gave the New York the win.
▪ a pro-democracy rally
▪ the Monte Carlo Rally
▪ There was a late rally on the stock exchange.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Andrew often speaks, as he recently did, at the rallies for Burzynski.
▪ Any rally will be undermined by corporate investors redeeming mutual fund holdings, Subramanian said.
▪ It sells buttons, bumper stickers, jewelry, license plate frames and other items at conventions and rallies.
▪ On Wall Street, across-the-board buying in the oil sector sparked a rally.
▪ Stansted is sponsoring one of its firemen's rally driving activities.
▪ The bulk of the crowd had joined the Orthodox antigovernment rally.
▪ There is also an annual rally in May for Brownies, attended by members from all over the country.
▪ This leads to a more strategic game with long rallies.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
around
▪ It would be wise to start rallying around for some back up!
▪ A brand can be something both cities can rally around.
▪ Party workers have been rallying around since last Thursday night's arson attack which caused tens of thousands worth of damage.
round
▪ The time is now right to rally round the call for independence.
▪ Colleagues rally round to help Ann KIND-HEARTED fundraisers pulled out all the stops to donate more than £1,500 to a very ill colleague.
▪ Minutes later as neighbours rallied round to help the nursing home worker an ambulance arrived to take her to hospital.
▪ And a former manager at the company hopes the racing industry will rally round.
▪ After her return from compassionate leave following the death of her father, they had been prepared to rally round.
▪ But friends and well wishers rallied round and calling themselves Ashleys army, raised enough cash to buy him his own gymnasium.
■ NOUN
forces
▪ The Church took the lead in rallying the forces which drove out the poles and established the Romanovs on the throne.
▪ They rallied their forces to resist it.
▪ The Count rallied his forces in Bechafen where the constant stream of refugees meant lean rations and poor quarters for all.
market
▪ Only the Tokyo market rallied, as foreign buyers returned after recent worries about the effect of a stronger yen.
▪ The market rallied early in 1995, but then ran out of steam.
▪ Even homebuilding companies, one of the industries that lagged the stock market rally last year, rallied.
▪ On Terrible Tuesday, the weakened market rallied and the Dow rose 102 points, then 187 on Wednesday.
party
▪ Nor did the party rally large ranks of the unemployed or underprivileged.
▪ Merbah announced his intention of forming a new political party to rally followers of the late President Houari Boumedienne.
people
▪ On Feb. 24 over 100,000 people rallied in Manezh Square in support of Yeltsin.
▪ A history professor at Baghdad University, Sadoun Fadil, said people rally around their leader during hard times.
▪ On Feb. 20 thousands of people rallied at the university campus in the support of the hunger strikers.
price
▪ It convinced oil markets that quotas would be cut and briefly caused the oil price to rally.
▪ Wheat prices rallied as concerns spread that freezing cold and severe wind in the Plains states could damage the winter crop.
support
▪ A campaign to rally support for this was launched in March.
▪ Still, Reagan could not rally support sufficient to get the Congress behind the effort.
▪ The essential need when a proposed redevelopment poses a threat is to rally popular support.
▪ They must also be able to rally support and achieve results in the midst of almost constant organizational change.
▪ I intend to rally that support.
▪ She rallies support for the endangered whale, catalogues underwater life and creates new devices in which to explore virgin sea worlds.
▪ The intelligentsia was actively rallying support against the eviction.
▪ Banks own small stakes of their own and can rally support against a bidder.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Churchill's stirring speeches helped rally his countrymen to fight against the enemy.
▪ Miami rallied to defeat New Orleans 28-24.
▪ On the stock market, share prices rallied after a four-day decline.
▪ Recent news reports on the situation in the capital have helped rally support for the war.
▪ The main effect of the new tax was to rally opposition to the government.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ After her return from compassionate leave following the death of her father, they had been prepared to rally round.
▪ And if Dole fails them, they are not without heroes to rally to.
▪ And neighbours rallied round with games.
▪ But the Bruins snoozed through the final minutes, allowing the Sun Devils to rally.
▪ General Lee, on horseback, dashed among the fugitives and implored them to rally.
▪ Share rallied as investors welcomed robust earnings growth by Wisconsin-based companies that were able to meet or beat expectations.
▪ The Dow Jones index, which peaked last year at 11,722, dropped below 9,500 before rallying.
▪ The yen rallied for a day, but that was all.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Rally

Rally \Ral"ly\, n. Good-humored raillery.

Rally

Rally \Ral"ly\ (r[a^]l"l[y^]), v. i. To use pleasantry, or satirical merriment.

Rally

Rally \Ral"ly\, v. i.

  1. To come into orderly arrangement; to renew order, or united effort, as troops scattered or put to flight; to assemble; to unite.

    The Grecians rally, and their powers unite.
    --Dryden.

    Innumerable parts of matter chanced just then to rally together, and to form themselves into this new world.
    --Tillotson.

  2. To collect one's vital powers or forces; to regain health or consciousness; to recuperate.

  3. To recover strength after a decline in prices; -- said of the market, stocks, etc.

Rally

Rally \Ral"ly\ (r[a^]l"l[y^]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Rallied (r[a^]l"l[i^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. Rallying.] [OF. ralier, F. rallier, fr. L. pref. re- + ad + ligare to bind. See Ra-, and 1st Ally.] To collect, and reduce to order, as troops dispersed or thrown into confusion; to gather again; to reunite.

Rally

Rally \Ral"ly\, v. t. [F. railler. See Rail to scoff.] To attack with raillery, either in good humor and pleasantry, or with slight contempt or satire.

Honeycomb . . . rallies me upon a country life.
--Addison.

Strephon had long confessed his amorous pain, Which gay Corinna rallied with disdain.
--Gay.

Syn: To banter; ridicule; satirize; deride; mock.

Rally

Rally \Ral"ly\, n.; pl. Rallies (r[a^]l"l[i^]z).

  1. The act or process of rallying (in any of the senses of that word).

  2. A political mass meeting. [Colloq. U. S.]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
rally

1650s, originally in the military sense of "a regrouping for renewed action after a repulse," from rally (v.1). Sense of "mass meeting to stir enthusiasm" first attested 1840, American English. Sense of "gathering of automobile enthusiasts" is from 1932, from French rallye, itself from the English noun. Sports sense of "long series of hits" in tennis, etc., is from 1881, earlier "series of back-and-forth blows in a boxing match" (1829).

rally

"bring together," c.1600, from French rallier, from Old French ralier "reassemble, unite again," from re- "again" (see re-) + alier "unite" (see ally (v.)). Intransitive meaning "pull together hastily, recover order, revive, rouse" is from 1660s. Related: Rallied; rallying. Rally round the flag (1862) is a line from popular American Civil War song "Battle Cry of Freedom."

rally

"make fun of, tease," 1660s, from French railler "to rail, reproach" (see rail (v.)).

Wiktionary
rally

Etymology 1 n. 1 A demonstration; an event where people gather together to protest for or against a given cause 2 (context squash table tennis tennis badminton English) A sequence of strokes between serve and score a point. 3 (context motor racing English) An event in which competitors drive through a series of timed special stages at intervals. The winner is the driver who completes all stages with the shortest cumulative time. 4 (context business trading English) A recovery after a decline in prices; -- said of the market, stocks, etc. vb. 1 To collect, and reduce to order, as troops dispersed or thrown into confusion; to gather again; to reunite. 2 To come into orderly arrangement; to renew order, or united effort, as troops scattered or put to flight; to assemble; to unite. 3 To collect one's vital powers or forces; to regain health or consciousness; to recuperate. 4 (context business trading English) To recover strength after a decline in prices; -- said of the market, stocks, etc. Etymology 2

n. Good-humoured raillery. vb. To tease; to chaff good-humouredly.

WordNet
rally
  1. n. a large gathering of people intended to arouse enthusiasm [syn: mass meeting]

  2. the feat of mustering strength for a renewed effort; "he singled to start a rally in the 9th inning"; "he feared the rallying of their troops for a counterattack" [syn: rallying]

  3. a marked recovery of strength or spirits during an illness

  4. an automobile race run over public roads

  5. (sports) an unbroken sequence of several successive strokes; "after a short rally Connors won the point" [syn: exchange]

  6. v. gather; "drum up support" [syn: beat up, drum up]

  7. call to arms; of military personnel [syn: call up, mobilize, mobilise] [ant: demobilize]

  8. gather or bring together; "muster the courage to do something"; "she rallied her intellect"; "Summon all your courage" [syn: muster, summon, come up, muster up]

  9. return to a former condition; "The jilted lover soon rallied and found new friends"; "The stock market rallied" [syn: rebound]

  10. harass with persistent criticism or carping; "The children teased the new teacher"; "Don't ride me so hard over my failure"; "His fellow workers razzed him when he wore a jacket and tie" [syn: tease, razz, rag, cod, tantalize, tantalise, bait, taunt, twit, ride]

  11. [also: rallied]

Wikipedia
Rally

Rally or rallye may refer to:

Rally (tennis)

A rally in tennis is a collective name given to a sequence of back and forth shots between players, within a point.

A rally starts with the serve and the return of the serve, followed by continuous return shots until a point is scored which ends the rally.

Rally (How I Met Your Mother)

"Rally" is the eighteenth episode of the ninth season of the CBS sitcom How I Met Your Mother, and the 202nd episode overall.

Rally (stock market)

A rally is a period of sustained increases in the prices of stocks, bonds or indexes. This type of price movement can happen during either a bull or a bear market, when it is known as either a bull market rally or a bear market rally, respectively. However, a rally will generally follow a period of flat or declining prices.

An increase in prices during a primary trend bear market is called a bear market rally. A bear market rally is sometimes defined as an increase of 10% to 20%. Bear market rallies typically begin suddenly and are often short-lived. Notable bear market rallies occurred in the Dow Jones index after the 1929 stock market crash leading down to the market bottom in 1932, and throughout the late 1960s and early 1970s. The Japanese Nikkei 225 has been typified by a number of bear market rallies since the late 1980s while experiencing an overall long-term downward trend.

Usage examples of "rally".

They brought their black horses south to join with the Queen and those princes who had rallied to her standard, and then, when I saw that the Queen and Ancel were truly set upon this course, I rode to where the King lay camped.

It took the murder of my son and an extraordinary rallying effort to make people fight back against the thinking machines, after so many centuries of apathy and lack of initiative.

I clutched the aquamanile to my chest as I squared my shoulders and sent him as offended a glare as I could rally.

They will welcome the chance to rally behind the Aeleding himself, Atheling Radgar, the lost heir miraculously returned to us.

After experiencing reverses they fell back without disorder, and retired behind the Aube, where they rallied and obtained numerous reinforcements, which daily arrived, and which soon enabled them to resume the offensive.

StarDrifter paid more attention to this part of the Song than he had the previous verses, describing in detail both what the Icarii had lost and how they had been unable to counter both the wicked lies of the Seneschal and the axes of the Groundwalkers who rallied to the Brotherhood.

May 1857, that a telegram arrived at the fort informing the Resident and Brigadier General Sir James Cameron that Indian army sepoys had revolted in Meerut, killed their officers and British civilians in the town and were marching on Delhi to rally behind the Moghul Emperor, Bahadur Shah II, against the British.

She gave me a warm welcome, and began to rally me on having spent the whole night with Madame Trenti.

She then began to rally me on the pleasure I should have at the Hague, where I should see Madame Trenti again.

And Chicano activists soon learned that a two-minute news feature on KMEX was crucial to the success of a mass rally, because TV was the only way to reach a mass Chicano audience in a hurry.

When martial law was declared, the citizenry of Beijing seemed to rally as one to protect the students and prevent the soldiers from reaching them.

German sea-power was to be made strong enough to attract allies by its ability to rally all free nations without any curatorship by the Anglo-Saxons.

She almost died, but the lords of Defalk, especially Lord Jecks, rallied behind her.

She argued, but did not carp or collude or try to rally the opinions of others, as the Deified had become accustomed to do since Makarska Vis introduced the spirit of divisiveness.

Coach Van Dermit, who, obviously uncomfortable with the dramatics of the pep rally, quickly presented all the members of the team.