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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
race
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a bike race
▪ The Tour de France is a famous bike race.
a boat race
▪ There’s a boat race on the river tomorrow.
a championship race
▪ She was well ahead in the championship race.
a cycle race
▪ the annual cycle race around France
a racing bike
▪ He bought a cool new racing bike.
a racing car (also a race car American English)
▪ He became a racing car driver.
a racing driver (=driving racing cars in competitions)
▪ world famous racing drivers like Lewis Hamilton
arms race
▪ the nuclear arms race
clouds race/scud (=move quickly)
▪ A wind was blowing and soft clouds were scudding across the sky.
drag race
flat racing
get out of/quit the rat race
▪ the story of a couple who quit the rat race
golfing/sporting/racing etc calendar
▪ The Derby is a major event in the racing calendar.
horse racing
human race
master race
motor racing
nuclear arms race
▪ the nuclear arms race
obstacle race
prepare yourself for a race/fight etc
▪ The Chicago Bears are busy preparing themselves for the big game.
race car
race meeting
race relations (=relations between people from different races who live in the same place)
▪ New government measures aim to improve race relations in inner cities.
race relations
▪ We need to do more to promote good race relations.
race riot
race riots (=caused by a problem between different races)
▪ In 1967, there were race riots in a number of major American cities.
racial/race discrimination
▪ Laws have been passed banning racial discrimination.
racial/race hatred
▪ Feelings of racial hatred were drummed into him as a child.
racing car
rat race
▪ the story of a couple who quit the rat race
relay race
sack race
sb's pulse races (=beats very quickly)
▪ His long fingers brushed hers, sending her pulse racing.
sb’s heart races (=it beats very fast)
▪ Was there someone in the alley? Joe’s heart began to race.
three-legged race
win a race
▪ He should have won that race but he came third.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
human
▪ It was to change the life of the human race as much as had steam.
▪ In this experiment in controlled sociology, various sample populations had been assured that the human race had made contact with extraterrestrials.
▪ Nick Ellis, London Does the human race have a future longer than its past?
▪ There have been three significant changes in the way the human race has worked.
▪ May we strive to become involved, not just in ourselves, but in the rest of the human race.
▪ One could gather the entire written output of the human race and load it into a single moving van.
▪ Her hair was taken back just on one side, and she smiled in the general direction of the entire human race.
▪ Community shame is a great motivator, has been for thousands of years in the history of the human race.
presidential
▪ The only serious contender left in the presidential race is Guei himself.
▪ Gramm, 53, is the third candidate to quit the presidential race.
▪ The cost of the presidential and congressional races may top $ 1. 6 billion.
▪ Lamar Alexander, who dropped out of the presidential race Wednesday, to endorse him in Nashville on Friday.
▪ And even if the agency avoids further scathing, it is likely to become a hot target in the presidential race.
▪ It also demonstrated how volatile the presidential race is, with change an ever-present participant.
▪ It also demonstrated how volatile is a presidential race in which change is an ever-present participant.
▪ To climb back into the presidential race, he must get abortion off the agenda.
■ NOUN
card
▪ Mugabe now plays the race card.
▪ And he comes with no cumbersome race card.
▪ The only race card being played is being played by the right hon. Gentleman.
▪ It will give the various groups and Tory Members who seek to play the race card the opportunity to do so.
horse
▪ The Grand National as always, has been the horse race of the year.
▪ The musicals are a real horse race.
▪ The women's competition was a two horse race between last year's winners Surrey and previous champions Essex.
▪ It is certainly better than any horse race, or any other gambling, when the odds are never in your favor.
▪ Meanwhile Labour insist Cheltenham is now a 3 horse race with issues not personalities at the forefront.
▪ Because for once the Grammy contest is shaping up as a real horse race.
▪ As the spirit of the day mounted, there would probably be horse races and wrestling matches to entertain the folks.
meeting
▪ Now, there were two days on which the only race meeting were in the north.
▪ One could imagine her at a shires garden party or a race meeting.
▪ The first detailed record of a race meeting dates from 1709 when the course was levelled and improved.
▪ Exhibitions, cup finals, race meetings, and great royal occasions drew the excursionists to their local station.
▪ The school grounds had been used as a car park during yesterday's race meeting.
▪ The blue suit that no longer went to the Curragh race meetings or the Dublin Horse Show, was his evening wear.
rat
▪ Children are forced into the rat race for higher salary and prestige.
▪ An executive from an international chemical company has given up the rat race to run a plant nursery.
▪ Too much of a rat race.
▪ Life is a rat race. 35.
▪ At least we would be out of the rat race until I had worked up some seniority in my job.
riot
▪ Apart from politically inspired race riots in the early 1960s, rarely did Black people behave badly towards us.
▪ From her seat above the town, Clappe watches the race riot.
▪ Notting Hill Carnival began unofficially in 1959 as a response to the the previous year's race riots.
▪ In 1967, the nation was traumatized by race riots in a number of major cities.
▪ Now however, a miniature version of the race riot that Gallagher had predicted exploded on campus.
road
▪ There was a cycle road race and a ten mile road walking race, fly-casting and clay-pigeon shooting competitions.
▪ Don't miss our London seminar April 21 will be the biggest day in the 1991 road race calendar.
▪ Success in this 85 mile road race is only one of Andy's many cycling achievements.
▪ Even so it was just great to get back on a road race bike again in February.
▪ The men's senior road race champion for 1991 was the ever improving Matt Stevens.
▪ Four years later the most famous of all road races, the Mille Miglia, was created.
▪ Once he had the capacity for international road race events.
▪ But as part of a council cost cutting exercise the Redcar ten mile road race will not be held this year.
senate
▪ This year, one wealthy candidate dropped $ 12 million of his own money into a Senate race.
▪ In all other Senate races, incumbents won, including Tom Harkin, D-Iowa.
■ VERB
enter
▪ For him, from the moment you entered the race, there could be no respite.
▪ Feinstein has let it be known that she is considering entering the race for governor.
▪ More than 200 riders have entered the 10 races, which begin at 11.30 a.m.
▪ Colin Powell might enter the race.
▪ The classy eight-year-old has never before been entered in either race.
▪ The story was about two rival South London gangs building soapbox cars to enter for a race.
▪ He displayed pride in having fared far better than anyone anticipated when he entered the race.
lose
▪ But be sure that others will not be so inhibited, and too much hesitation will lose the competitive race.
▪ Pre won, of course; he never lost in 25 races longer than a mile at Hayward Field.
▪ You've already lost me one race because you're still hung up on that business at Ascot.
▪ Faster, faster, faster yet; hurry or lose the race.
▪ I lost the race and finished up trying to row half a dinghy with the crew cheering in the distance.
▪ Once again this autumn, I lost the race with the squirrels to harvest the hazel nuts.
▪ In a bitter defeat, Lugar lost a race for school board president and decided to leave the board.
run
▪ The rest of us are running a different race - by choice perhaps.
▪ Over the course of the Olympics, he ran eight races in seven days en route to his historic victories.
▪ The Unlimited Silver saw Bill Rheinschild run away the race.
▪ She ran a marvellous race when third to Runun over the course recently.
▪ It is also true that Mr Brown, despite his political prowess, has never run in a statewide race.
▪ It is a bit like running a race with no starting or finishing lines.
▪ Older wardens planned, and even some of them ran, races of all kinds.
▪ Then at the Nürburgring, the 003 ran its last race, with Regazzoni pushing him off.
win
▪ His colleagues vowed to win the race again in his honour.
▪ In 1993, Fellows won 3 of 13 races, but wound up runner-up.
▪ I won my race into a 1.5 metres per second wind.
▪ You may not win every race.
▪ I wanted to win that race.
▪ Today, at last, the economy looks as if it may win the race against soaring population figures.
▪ While Republicans should be uniting behind Dole to win the race, Pete Wilson is looking forward to making a brokered convention.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(of) mixed race
▪ Elsewhere, people of mixed race lost their monopoly of the middling-rank jobs, as they found themselves jostled from below.
▪ Equally, though, there are unique burdens associated with being born into a mixed race family.
▪ The murder suspect is described as of black or mixed race in his early 20s.
a two/three/four etc horse race
▪ The women's competition was a two horse race between last year's winners Surrey and previous champions Essex.
one-horse race
▪ It was a jibe that nearly became a prophecy, though Cambridge were left with more of a one-horse race.
play the race/nationalist/environmentalist etc card
▪ It will give the various groups and Tory Members who seek to play the race card the opportunity to do so.
▪ Mugabe now plays the race card.
race/work/battle against time
▪ But his parents are faced with a desperate race against time to raise the money necessary for his treatment.
▪ For the cartoonists, it's a daily battle against time, to create work that captures the imagination.
▪ However, with the contract negotiations starting, Lipton and others know that they are fighting a battle against time.
▪ It is a race against time.
▪ It looks as if my whole life is a race against time.
▪ Now it is a race against time to rebuild it before high spring ties later this month.
▪ The picture which became the cover shot, of the Rollright Stones, was a particular race against time.
▪ They face a race against time as fears grow over the health of the whales and the possibility of their becoming beached.
the human race
▪ Pollution is threatening the future of the human race.
▪ The entire human race could be wiped out by nuclear war.
▪ Until then, no member of the human race had ever been able to make a map of the whole world.
the rat race
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a person of mixed race
▪ He's won three races in a row, using the same car and the same engine.
▪ He lost to Pfeiffer in last year's mayoral race.
▪ He lost to Pfeiffer in the race for district attorney.
▪ Her husband spent all their money gambling on horse races.
▪ Hill won the race, and Schumacher finished second.
▪ human beings of all races
▪ In the race for the White House, candidates will promise almost anything.
▪ It's a 10 kilometer race from downtown to the river.
▪ Krystal has already qualified for the hundred-metre race in the Olympics next year.
▪ Lewis won his final race.
▪ Mary was discriminated against because of her age and race.
▪ people of all races and religions
▪ People should be treated equally, regardless of their race, age, or sex.
▪ Studies are under way to find out why men of some races are more prone to some forms of cancer than others.
▪ the annual university boat race between Oxford and Cambridge
▪ the arms race
▪ the Breeder's Cup races at Churchill Downs.
▪ The group is working to improve race relations in our cities.
▪ the Nordic races
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A test ban that could not inspire confidence would undermine stability and might even provoke a new arms race.
▪ And they now look set to promote more harmonious race relations in the community after passing with flying colours.
▪ From then on she discovered many things about the human race, but could find no explanations for them.
▪ Glengormley's Jeremy McWilliam's gave the home fans a further treat with victories in both Superbike races.
▪ Some of the new proteins result from an arms race between animals and plants.
▪ Still others require respondents to choose just one race category.
▪ This is presumably what happens in the cases of light, match and race discussed above.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
ahead
▪ As Pearl shares raced ahead there was some determined buying of merchant banks, particularly Morgan Grenfell.
▪ With stocks racing ahead and the Dow and Nasdaq in record territory day after day, our office phones are unusually quiet.
▪ Wildly Rachel's mind raced ahead.
▪ Everywhere, it seemed, people were racing ahead of me toward my goals.
▪ Culture and symbolic language, once developed through evolution, allow humans to race ahead.
▪ But in some ways, the students' technical skills have raced ahead of conceptual understanding.
▪ False beginners may now race ahead.
around
▪ Course racing A discipline of competitive windsurfing which involves racing around a course marked by a series of buoys.
▪ Last month she was racing around looking at holiday cards for snow dome images.
▪ But it is Day-Lewis who dominates everything as he races around, long locks flowing and trusty musket in tow.
▪ Yanto, full of excited anticipation, had raced around to Bert's garage as soon as work finished on Friday.
▪ As Guy sat contemplating this conclusion, a fair-haired child came racing around the corner of the north tower.
▪ And if the curtains stirred, I'd race around the block, then slowly ride by once again.
▪ As he raced around one sharp corner he almost ran into the back of a slow moving lorry.
▪ A torrent of words pour out as thoughts race around in her head, vying with each other for verbal expression.
off
▪ If a cat struck its leg in the air, they all raced off, screaming that they'd seen something move.
▪ They go racing off the edge like Thelma and Louise.
▪ Meh'Lindi turned and raced off up a steel stairway.
▪ Otis had raced off somewhere else.
▪ Hank raced off before I could collar him, scampering like a puppy along a path leading up to the Mills Observatory.
▪ Others, like Nordstrom, raced off in search of other routes to their homes.
▪ The rest raced off, bouncing across the heather.
■ NOUN
heart
▪ Whenever he came in my direction, it was just electric-my heart started racing.
▪ Her heart was racing, but it had to be said.
▪ David froze, his heart racing as fast as it had been a couple of minutes before.
▪ My heart is racing faster than Michael Johnson.
▪ A chair shifted, my heart raced, Conchis spoke a single indistinguishable word in a low voice.
▪ His groin had moved with the danger in such a thing; his heart had raced.
▪ For a moment Schramm could not swallow and his heart began to race.
▪ So we peed in the showers, giggling, our hearts racing with the forbidden act.
mind
▪ My mind raced, what does he want?
▪ Her head was swirling, her mind was racing, her ankle was swelling and her left leg was numb.
▪ Her mind was racing, though.
▪ I watched it inching nearer, my mind racing this way and that with the possibilities of what must be done.
▪ Wildly Rachel's mind raced ahead.
▪ She considered what she had discovered, her mind racing like a Roladex.
▪ In any case, Amiss's mind was racing, grappling with a situation devoid of any rational explanation.
pulse
▪ I shook my head, my pulse still racing from the shock.
pulses
▪ As a contest it was neither designed to set the pulses racing nor win converts.
▪ A comedy which will set pulses racing.
▪ The leaden hand of the Government's speechwriters set no pulses racing.
▪ The sudden shock and noise of whirring wings broke the stillness and left our pulses racing.
▪ Take a seat behind the wheel and there isn't much to get the pulses racing either.
▪ There was something about this man that set her pulses racing.
▪ Brief encounter at despatch box sets Tory pulses racing Sketch.
▪ And why were her own pulses racing as if the floodgates of her bloodstream had been opened?
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(of) mixed race
▪ Elsewhere, people of mixed race lost their monopoly of the middling-rank jobs, as they found themselves jostled from below.
▪ Equally, though, there are unique burdens associated with being born into a mixed race family.
▪ The murder suspect is described as of black or mixed race in his early 20s.
a two/three/four etc horse race
▪ The women's competition was a two horse race between last year's winners Surrey and previous champions Essex.
car/bike/greyhound etc racing
▪ As a boy you were so butch it hurt. Bike racing champ, marble wizard.
▪ Home of County cricket, League football and a greyhound racing stadium.
▪ Mosley's vision of cars and car racing in the next century would matter in this ecology-conscious age worried by recession.
▪ Sporting events such as car racing give me a headache.
▪ Stock car racing, they say, is family-oriented.
▪ Stock car racing, though, is old-fashioned.
▪ The move would not interfere with greyhound racing and would leave the old Plough Lane football ground available for redevelopment.
▪ They may beat us at cricket and bike racing, but we are better on crags!
one-horse race
▪ It was a jibe that nearly became a prophecy, though Cambridge were left with more of a one-horse race.
race/work/battle against time
▪ But his parents are faced with a desperate race against time to raise the money necessary for his treatment.
▪ For the cartoonists, it's a daily battle against time, to create work that captures the imagination.
▪ However, with the contract negotiations starting, Lipton and others know that they are fighting a battle against time.
▪ It is a race against time.
▪ It looks as if my whole life is a race against time.
▪ Now it is a race against time to rebuild it before high spring ties later this month.
▪ The picture which became the cover shot, of the Rollright Stones, was a particular race against time.
▪ They face a race against time as fears grow over the health of the whales and the possibility of their becoming beached.
sb's mind is racing
the human race
▪ Pollution is threatening the future of the human race.
▪ The entire human race could be wiped out by nuclear war.
▪ Until then, no member of the human race had ever been able to make a map of the whole world.
the rat race
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Schumacher will be racing in the Monaco Grand Prix.
▪ Some kids were racing rubber ducks in the stream.
▪ Trent woke at three a.m., his heart racing.
▪ Turner grabbed the ball and raced 65 yards for a touchdown.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Another one races by, touches my hand, and keeps running.
▪ As a contest it was neither designed to set the pulses racing nor win converts.
▪ At one time for example she was reported to have been racing around Melbourne in a brand new pink sports car.
▪ Every Kentucky Derby winner since 1984 already had raced three or four times as a 3-year-old.
▪ In two weeks, they race over 1,000 miles.
▪ Mr Sammler seen seeing was still in rapid currents with his heart. like an escaping creature racing away from him.
▪ On days like today they get the chance to race it.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
race

Consolation game \Con`so*la"tion game\, match \match\, pot \pot\, race \race\, etc. A game, match, etc., open only to losers in early stages of contests. [Webster 1913 Suppl.] ||

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
race

"act of running," c.1300, from Old Norse ras "running, rush (of water)," cognate with Old English ræs "a running, a rush, a leap, jump; a storming, an attack;" or else a survival of the Old English word with spelling influenced by the Old Norse one. The Norse and Old English words are from Proto-Germanic *res- (cognates: Middle Dutch rasen "to rave, rage," German rasen, Old English raesettan "to rage" (of fire)), from a variant form of PIE *ers- (1) "be in motion" (see err). Originally a northern word, it became general in English c.1550. Meaning "act of running" is from early 14c. Meaning "contest of speed" first recorded 1510s.

race

"people of common descent," a word from the 16th century, from Middle French race, earlier razza "race, breed, lineage, family" (16c.), possibly from Italian razza, of unknown origin (cognate with Spanish and Portuguese raza). Etymologists say no connection with Latin radix "root," though they admit this might have influenced the "tribe, nation" sense.\n

\nOriginal senses in English included "wines with characteristic flavor" (1520), "group of people with common occupation" (c.1500), and "generation" (1540s). Meaning "tribe, nation, or people regarded as of common stock" is by 1560s. Modern meaning of "one of the great divisions of mankind based on physical peculiarities" is from 1774 (though as OED points out, even among anthropologists there never has been an accepted classification of these).Just being a Negro doesn't qualify you to understand the race situation any more than being sick makes you an expert on medicine. [Dick Gregory, 1964]\nIn mid-20c. U.S. music catalogues, "Negro." Klein suggests these derive from Arabic ra's "head, beginning, origin" (compare Hebrew rosh). Old English þeode meant both "race, folk, nation" and "language;" as a verb, geþeodan, it meant "to unite, to join."

race

c.1200, rasen "to rush," from a Scandinavian source akin to the source of race (n.1), reinforced by the noun in English and by Old English cognate ræsan "to rush headlong, hasten, enter rashly." Meaning "run swiftly" is from 1757. Meaning "run in competition against" is from 1809. Transitive sense of "cause to run" is from 1860. In reference to an engine, etc., "run with uncontrolled speed," from 1862. Related: Raced; racing.

race

"strong current of water," late 14c., perhaps a particular use of race (n.1), or from or influenced by Old French raz, which had a similar meaning, and which probably is from Breton raz "a strait, narrow channel;" this French source also may have given race its meaning of "channel of a stream" (especially an artificial one to a mill), which is recorded in English from 1560s.

Wiktionary
race

Etymology 1 n. 1 A contest between people, animals, vehicles, etc. where the goal is to be the first to reach some objective. Several horses run in a ''horse race'', and the first one to reach the finishing post wins 2 A progressive movement toward a goal. 3 A fast-moving current of water, such as that which powers a mill wheel. 4 Swift progress; rapid course; a running. 5 Competitive action of any kind, especially when prolonged; hence, career; course of life. 6 travels, runs, or journeys. (rfex) 7 The bushings of a rolling element bearing which contacts the rolling elements. vb. 1 (context intransitive English) To take part in a race (in the sense of a contest). 2 (context transitive English) To compete against in such a race. 3 (context intransitive English) To move or drive at high speed. Etymology 2

n. 1 A group of sentient beings, particularly people, distinguished by common heritage or characteristics: 2 # A large group of people distinguished from others on the basis of a common heritage. 3 # A large group of people distinguished from others on the basis of common physical characteristics, such as skin color or hair type. 4 # (context controversial usage English) One of the categories from the many subcategorizations of the human species. ''See Wikipedia's article on (w Race (historical_definitions) historical definitions of race).'' Etymology 3

n. A rhizome or root, ''especially'' of ginger.

WordNet
race
  1. n. any competition; "the race for the presidency"

  2. people who are believed to belong to the same genetic stock; "some biologists doubt that there are important genetic differences between races of human beings"

  3. a contest of speed; "the race is to the swift"

  4. the flow of air that is driven backwards by an aircraft propeller [syn: slipstream, airstream, backwash, wash]

  5. (biology) a taxonomic group that is a division of a species; usually arises as a consequence of geographical isolation within a species [syn: subspecies]

  6. a canal for a current of water [syn: raceway]

race
  1. v. step on it; "He rushed down the hall to receive his guests"; "The cars raced down the street" [syn: rush, hotfoot, hasten, hie, speed, pelt along, rush along, cannonball along, bucket along, belt along] [ant: linger]

  2. compete in a race; "he is running the Marathon this year"; "let's race and see who gets there first" [syn: run]

  3. to work as fast as possible towards a goal, sometimes in competition with others; "We are racing to find a cure for AIDS"

  4. cause to move fast or to rush or race; "The psychologist raced the rats through a long maze" [syn: rush]

Wikipedia
Race (VTA)

Race is a light rail station operated by Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA). The station consists of a single platform with a single trackway. Trains from both directions arrive on the same track. Race is served by the Mountain View–Winchester light rail line.

Race (bearing)

The rolling-elements of a rolling-element bearing ride on races. The large race that goes into a bore is called the outer race, and the small race that the shaft rides in is called the inner race.

Race (play)

Race is a play by David Mamet that premiered on Broadway in December 2009. Mamet has stated that the intended "theme is race and the lies we tell each other on the subject."

Race

Race, RACE or "The Race" may refer to:

Race (2011 film)

Race is a 2011 Malayalam thriller film directed by Kukku Surendran and starring Kunchacko Boban, Mamta Mohandas, Indrajith, Baby Anikha , and Gowri Munjal. The story is based on Greg Iles's novel 24 hours. The film opened in Kerala theatres on 11 February 2011 to negative reviews. The film was dubbed into Telugu as Game by Narne Media Solutions (Pvt) Limited in 2013.

Race (human categorization)

Race, as a social construct, is a group of people who share similar and distinct physical characteristics. First used to refer to speakers of a common language and then to denote national affiliations, by the 17th century race began to refer to physical (i.e. phenotypical) traits. The term was often used in a general biological taxonomic sense, starting from the 19th century, to denote genetically differentiated human populations defined by phenotype.

Social conceptions and groupings of races vary over time, involving folk taxonomiesSee:

  • that define essential types of individuals based on perceived traits. Scientists consider biological essentialism obsolete, and generally discourage racial explanations for collective differentiation in both physical and behavioral traits.

Even though there is a broad scientific agreement that essentialist and typological conceptualizations of race are untenable, scientists around the world continue to conceptualize race in widely differing ways, some of which have essentialist implications. While some researchers sometimes use the concept of race to make distinctions among fuzzy sets of traits, others in the scientific community suggest that the idea of race often is used in a naive or simplistic way, and argue that, among humans, race has no taxonomic significance by pointing out that all living humans belong to the same species, Homo sapiens, and subspecies, Homo sapiens sapiens. Other researchers contend that modern genetics, as well as the "confusion of analytical domains in making assertions about race," prove that human races exist.

Since the second half of the 20th century, the associations of race with the ideologies and theories that grew out of the work of 19th-century anthropologists and physiologists has led to the use of the word race itself becoming problematic. Although still used in general contexts, race has often been replaced by less ambiguous and emotionally charged synonyms: populations, people(s), ethnic groups, or communities, depending on context.

RACE (container)

Railways of Australia Container Express or RACE was a slightly wider version of the standard ISO shipping container able to take 2 Australia Standard Pallets side by side. More than 1000 units were operated by the Railways of Australia, an association of the Government-owned railways which comprised Australian National, the State Rail Authority of New South Wales, Queensland Railways, the Victorian State Transport Authority and Westrail. These entities operated in Australia prior to privatisation of freight services.

The RACE containers were developed in 1974 in New South Wales by the Public Transport Commission, and built by Freighter Industries Ltd. The RACE general container was designed to accommodate 20 standard pallets stacked in two levels. Carrying capacity was and it had rear and side doors for ease of loading and unloading. There were also ISO RACE containers for non-palletised freight, as well as ventilated, refrigerated and side-loading containers.

Race (surname)

Race is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

  • Harley Race (born 1943), US-American wrestler, coach and promoter
  • Hugo Race, Australian musician
  • Janice Race, US-American, former comic book editor for DC Comics
  • John Abner Race (1914–1983), US-American politician
  • John Burton Race (born 1957), British chef
  • Steve Race (1921–2009), British musician and radio personality
Race (2013 film)

Race is a 2013 Tollywood romance film directed by Ramesh Raparthi and produced by Anne Ravi, released on 1 March 2013.

Race (film series)

Race is a series of Indian action- thriller films. The series is directed by Abbas-Mustan and produced by Ramesh S. Taurani and Kumar S. Tauraniunder the banner of Tips Music Films. The series stars Anil Kapoor and Saif Ali Khan as recurring roles. The first film is loosely based on the 1998 Hollywood movie Goodbye Lover. The series is now eighth Highest-grossing film series in Bollywood.

Race (biology)

In biological taxonomy, race is an informal rank in the taxonomic hierarchy, below the level of subspecies; the term is recognized by some, but is no longer governed by any of the formal codes of biological nomenclature. It has been used as a higher rank than strain, with several strains making up one race. Various definitions exist. Races may be genetically distinct phenotypic populations of interbreeding individuals within the same species, or they may be defined in other ways, e.g. geographically, or physiologically. Genetic isolation between races is not complete, but genetic differences may have accumulated that are not (yet) sufficient to separate species.

Race (2008 film)

Race is a 2008 Bollywood thriller film directed by Abbas-Mustan and produced under the Tips Films banner. Released on 21 March 2008 worldwide, it stars Saif Ali Khan, Bipasha Basu, Akshaye Khanna, Katrina Kaif, Anil Kapoor and Sameera Reddy in pivotal roles. The film also stars Dilip Tahil and Johnny Lever for thriller and comedy sketches. It is the first installment of Race film series.

Set and mostly filmed in Durban and Dubai, Race explores themes of sibling rivalry, betrayal and passion. It became the fourth highest grossing Bollywood film of the year. Race was dubbed into Tamil as Panthayam and in Telugu as Race Telugu. The film's sequel Race 2 was released in 2013, and was also a success.

Race (2007 film)

Race is an independent computer animated sci-fi action film, produced by Hyper Image, a post production and animation studio located in Glendale, California. Written by Rhonda Smiley and directed by Robert Brousseau, it stars James Hereth, Kevin Lewis, Russel Perryman, Jane Roberts, Terry Diab, Bill Mendieta, H.L. Cannon, J.J. Song, and Benita Marti.

It was first completed and screened for audiences at numerous film festivals in 2007, including the Winnipeg International Film Festival in Canada, the da Vinci Film Festival in Oregon, Philadelphia’s Big Bang Film Festival, Another Hole in the Head Film Festival in San Francisco, and Southern California’s FAIFF International Film Festival.

Following a pay-per-view run for RHI Entertainment in early 2010, the film was released on DVD by Phase 4 Films in Canada on May 18 and in the United States on May 25, 2010. It hit the US TV movie channels with a premiere on the Showtime Networks on October 14, 2010.

The film is 99 minutes long and is rated PG-13 by the MPAA for some suggestive images and action violence.

Race (2016 film)

Race is a 2016 biographical sports drama film about African American athlete Jesse Owens, who won a record-breaking four gold medals at the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games. Directed by Stephen Hopkins and written by Joe Shrapnel and Anna Waterhouse, the film stars Stephan James as Owens, and co-stars Jason Sudeikis, Jeremy Irons, William Hurt and Carice van Houten.

Principal photography began on July 24, 2014, in Montreal, Canada. Forecast Pictures, Solofilms, and Trinity Race produced the film, Entertainment One released the film in Canada, Focus Features in the United States on February 19, 2016, Eagle Pictures in Italy on March 31, 2016, and SquareOne Entertainment in Germany on May 5, 2016. The film was supported by the Owens family, the Jesse Owens Foundation, the Jesse Owens Trust and the Luminary Group.

The film's name is a play on the two meanings of the word "race" in English, both of which are very relevant to the film's plot: Owens' being black, a racial identity which greatly influenced his life and career, both in the US and in the Berlin Olympics; and his running again and again a race to win various running competitions.

Race (album)

Race is the third studio album released by Australian new wave band, Pseudo Echo. It was released via EMI Australia in 1988 and RCA Records internationally in 1989. Race resulted in a musical change for the group as it mirrored the music landscape at the time; dominated by big hair, big guitars and rock. While the album no doubt alienated the majority of the bands fan base, it equally attracted a new breed of rock loving fans.

The album included their track "Take On the World" which won at 1987 World Popular Song Festival (aka Yamaha Music Festival) in Japan.

Three singles were released from the album, the first "Fooled Again" (which had "Take On The World" as a B-side) peaked at No.32 in Australia in late 1988.

RACE (Remote Applications in Challenging Environments)

In 2014 it was announced that UKAEA at Culham Centre for Fusion Energy (CCFE) would create a new centre for robotics development. This led to the creation of RACE (Remote Applications in Challenging Environments) as part of the UK Government's Robotics and Autonomous Systems Strategy (RAS) this is one of the initiatives that is supporting development and growth in remote handling, pacing the way for the UK to be a world leader in this area. RACE uses the broad range of expertise from UKAEA and CCFE's past experience in remote handling used on JET ( Joint European Torus). RACE will be UKAEA's remote handling expertise organisation.

When fully operational, RACE will conduct R&D into remote applications and will offer access to state-of-the-art facilities, remote handling equipment and expertise to design, implement, train and operate complete solutions.

The £15 million Remote Applications in Challenging Environments (RACE) centre researches robotics for use in fields such as nuclear operation and decommissioning, deep-sea oil and gas extraction and intelligent mobility.

Usage examples of "race".

With a hasty glance toward the ablution facility, Abe raced after the others, to find them by the locked door.

I think this must be admitted, when we find that there are hardly any domestic races, either amongst animals or plants, which have not been ranked by some competent judges as mere varieties, and by other competent judges as the descendants of aboriginally distinct species.

Conquerors followed, and conquerors of those, an empire killed its mother aborning, a religion called men to strange hilltops, a new race and a new state bestrode the Earth.

The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.

United States shall not be denied or abridged because of race or sex or because the person is married.

They have targeted Glenn Abies because he stands for a way of living that we as members of the White Race believe in and hold to be true.

Three and a half days later the enemy raced past Zanshaa without firing a missile at Sula or anyone else, and accelerated on a path for the Vandrith gas giant.

If a man were called to fix the period in the history of the world, during which the condition of the human race was most happy and prosperous, he would, without hesitation, name that which elapsed from the death of Domitian to the accession of Commodus.

Leiter out by going to the Acme Baths to make the pay-off if Shy Smile failed to win the race.

Kicking Acorn to a gallop, she jumped a hedge and raced toward the mill.

She paused a moment before laying her hand against the admittance plate, composing her face and trying to calm her racing heartbeat.

He was admonished of his error by the chief of the race of Seljuk, who dwelt in the territory of Bochara.

Bay came racing out of the adobe house and hugged Sloan as she stepped down from her horse.

He explained that this was the time when the adolescents had to perform some great deed to earn adulthood, deeds that often included acts of mayhem against non-Sand People races.

These ancient Martians had been a highly cultivated and literary race, but during the vicissitudes of those trying centuries of readjustment to new conditions, not only did their advancement and production cease entirely, but practically all their archives, records, and literature were lost.