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The Collaborative International Dictionary

Porism

Porism \Po"rism\, n. [Gr. ? a thing procured, a deduction from a demonstration, fr. ? to bring, provide: cf. F. porisme.]

  1. (Geom.) A proposition affirming the possibility of finding such conditions as will render a certain determinate problem indeterminate or capable of innumerable solutions.
    --Playfair.

  2. (Gr. Geom.) A corollary.
    --Brande & C.

    Note: Three books of porisms of Euclid have been lost, but several attempts to determine the nature of these propositions and to restore them have been made by modern geometers.

Wikipedia

Porism

A porism is a mathematical proposition or corollary. In particular, the term porism has been used to refer to a direct result of a proof, analogous to how a corollary refers to a direct result of a theorem. In modern usage, a porism is a relation that holds for an infinite range of values but only if a certain condition is assumed, for example Steiner's porism. The term originates from three books of Euclid with porism, that have been lost. Note that a proposition may not have been proven, so a porism may not be a theorem, or for that matter, it may not be true.

Wiktionary

porism

n. 1 (context geometry English) A proposition affirming the possibility of finding such conditions as will render a certain determinate problem indeterminate or capable of innumerable solutions. 2 A corollary.

Usage examples of "porism".

It is not quite clear what a porism was to Euclid but from later commentators it appears to have been a conception intermediate between a theorem and a problem.