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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
pact
noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a suicide pact (=an agreement that two or more people make to kill themselves at the same time)
▪ She shot her husband and herself in a suicide pact.
non-aggression pact/treaty/agreement etc
▪ The countries will come together next week to sign a new non-aggression treaty.
suicide pact
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
electoral
▪ Yesterday, Labour's leader dismissed both electoral reform and pacts.
▪ One problem remained to be settled, which was the working out of the electoral pact.
▪ Following Bartlett's victory at Bridgewater, he launched a grass roots campaign for an electoral pact with Liberals and Communists.
new
▪ It's unclear how or when the mediator would react if a new pact isn't reached today.
■ NOUN
peace
▪ S.-brokered peace pact went into effect.
▪ On May 21 Haqqani announced that Masud and Hekmatyar had agreed upon, but not signed, a five-point peace pact.
▪ The commission also ordered a media campaign to raise awareness of the peace pact.
security
▪ The former Shah's advocacy of a collective security pact was a further black mark against the Gulf scheme.
suicide
▪ At the moment they don't know whether this was an accident, a murder or a suicide pact.
▪ So they joined in a suicide pact which would rid them for ever of parental domination.
▪ Lowestoft is a town twinned with nowhere, although it is considering a suicide pact with Basildon.
▪ Desperate and afraid, they formed a suicide pact.
▪ Detectives are investigating whether it was an accident, a murder or a suicide pact.
trade
▪ Mikoyan signs a trade pact with Che Guevara.
■ VERB
make
▪ In making a pact with this devil, Lancaster County made a Faustian bargain.
▪ But before they gave up their freedom they made a solemn pact to see them through possible months in jail.
seal
▪ Whichever way, the devil will seal the pact for the usual price of his new agent's soul.
▪ We reach out our hands and seal our pact.
sign
▪ Mikoyan signs a trade pact with Che Guevara.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
seal a deal/bargain/pact etc
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Mexico's Defense Ministry this month signed a pact that allows Mexican troops to train at American bases.
▪ Officials at IBM and Apple declined to comment on a possible pact between the two personal computer makers.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But, he said, it could not be a two-way pact.
▪ Over the past several weeks, I have broken the unspoken pact, without explanation.
▪ The pact details how the $ 81 million facility will be managed and operated.
▪ The pact is widely seen as one of the environmental fruits of glasnost in the Soviet Union.
▪ The pact they had silently concluded after Maurice's death stood exposed as a sham.
▪ The pact was ostensibly motivated by a desire to eradicate political dynasties and corruption in favour of political renovation and democratic change.
▪ The rights advocates claim the pact proves the market people were wrong all along.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
pact

pact \pact\ (p[a^]kt), n. [L. pactum, fr. paciscere to make a bargain or contract, fr. pacere to settle, or agree upon; cf. pangere to fasten, Gr. phgny`nai, Skr. p[=a][,c]a bond, and E. fang: cf. F. pacte. Cf. Peace, Fadge, v.] An agreement; a league; a compact; a covenant.
--Bacon.

The engagement and pact of society which goes by the name of the constitution.
--Burke.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
pact

early 15c., from Old French pacte "agreement, treaty, compact" (14c.), from Latin pactum "agreement, contract, covenant," noun use of neuter past participle of pacisci "to covenant, to agree, make a treaty," from PIE root *pag- "fix, join together, unite, make firm" (cognates: Sanskrit pasa- "cord, rope," Avestan pas- "to fetter," Greek pegnynai "to fix, make firm, fast or solid," Latin pangere "to fix, to fasten," Slavonic paž "wooden partition," Old English fegan "to join," fon "to catch seize").

Wiktionary
pact

n. 1 An agreement; a compact; a covenant. 2 (context lang=en international law) An agreement between two or more nations

WordNet
pact

n. a written agreement between two states or sovereigns [syn: treaty, accord]

Wikipedia
Pact (disambiguation)

A pact is a formal agreement.

Pact, The Pact or PACT may also refer to:

PACT (compiler)

PACT was a series of compilers for the IBM 701 and IBM 704 scientific computers. Their development was conducted jointly by IBM and a committee of customers starting in 1954. PACT I was developed for the 701, and PACT IA for the 704. The emphasis in that early generation of compilers was minimization of the memory footprint, because memory was a very expensive resource at the time. The word "compiler" was not in widespread use at the time, so most of the 1956 papers described it as an "(automatic) coding system", although the word compiler was also used in some papers.

PACT (interaction design)

In interaction design, PACT (an acronym for People, Activities, Contexts, Technologies) is a structure used to analyse with whom, what and where a user interact with a user interface

Pact

A pact, from Latin pactum ("something agreed upon"), is a formal agreement. In international relations, pacts are usually between two or more sovereign states. In domestic politics, pacts are usually between two or more political parties or other organizations.

Notable international pacts include:

  • Anti-Comintern Pact between Germany and Japan (1936)
  • Auto Pact between Canada and the United States (1965)
  • Kellogg–Briand Pact, a multilateral treaty against war (1928)
  • London Pact between Italy and the Triple Entente (Great Britain, France, and Russia) (1915)
  • Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact between Germany and the Soviet Union (1939)
  • Soviet–Japanese Neutrality Pact (1941)
  • North Atlantic pact, organizing the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (1949)
  • Pact of Steel between Italy and Germany (1939)
  • Stability and Growth Pact between European Union member states about fiscal policy (1997)
  • Tripartite Pact between Italy, Germany, and Japan (1940)
  • U.S.–North Korea Agreed Framework concerning the latter country's development of nuclear power (1994)
  • Warsaw Pact of Eastern European communist countries, led by the Soviet Union (1955)
PACT (Protestant Adoption Society)

PACT is an Irish adoption organisation founded in 1952, formerly called the Protestant Adoption Society. Its main office is Arabella House in Rathfarnham is named after the philanthropist Lady Arabella Denny. PACT is an independent Irish charity providing a range of adoption services to Irish families and is officially accredited by the Irish Governments Adoption Authority of Ireland PACT run the Here2Help Crisis Pregnancy Service.

Following legislation in 1952 which set up a legal framework for Adoption in Ireland, the Protestant Adoption Society was set up in the offices of the Church of Ireland Moral Welfare Society.

PACT holds the records of closed protestant run homes such as Denny House( Magdelan Mother and Baby Home) in Leeson Street, Dublin, the Bethany Home, Rathgar, Dublin, The Nursery Rescue Society in Templeogue, Fairfield Children's Home in Sandymount, and the Protestant Adoption Society(PAS)

Usage examples of "pact".

On December 3 the Japanese ambassador in Rome called on the Duce and formally asked Italy to declare war on the United States, in accordance with the Tripartite Pact, as soon as the conflict with America should begin.

Every physical comportment is the immanent product of a struggle or a pact among competing demonic forces: hence the violent, yet often surprisingly delicate, ambivalence with which the body expresses heterogeneous or conflicting intentions.

Heiren custom, Bannock explained, all signatories to an important pact were supposed to prove their good intentions by showing themselves in a public place.

But then in 1958, when the pro-British monarchy was overthrown by Qasim, the new dictator pulled Iraq out of the Baghdad Pact, allied himself with the Iraqi Communist Party, and opened a new relationship with the USSR.

Not for a long time has anybody been rash enough to break the pact and overtread the bounds.

International, and Devi Prasad, WRI general secretary, had taken nonviolent direct action to Eastern Europe in September 1968, leafleting a number of capitals in protest against the Soviet and Warsaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia.

The prestidigitator and the audience have entered into what I term the Pact of Acquiescent Sorcery.

They must honor that pact, he told her, they must honor it even if it was frustrating, unnecessary, or outright senseless to honor it, because not to honor it would create more quaggy willy-nilliness in the world.

A land that had been thus ever since ringing legend had dwindled into mere history and the thundering rhetoric of mythical heroes had become the ranting and mewling of an interminable list of political leaders in whose wake lay, inevitably, a long tangled skein of unfulfilled promises and broken pacts and treaties.

How would that affect the vote on the reintegration with the Colonial Pact?

Mat was certain the man hated losing a chance to ingratiate himself with his High Lord Samon by learning details of a pact between Andor and Tar Valon.

But say the final part of your pact is that if he agrees to join forces for a surprise attack on Lord Sanjiro of Satsuma at a time of your choosing.

Plain did Biri open up a bit, as they were preparing to cross the border into the Pact Lands.

Find out where Caledon hid the Chronostone, collect same, dispatch him, harvest his soul, and head back to the Hadean Executive with the happy news that the plan was now in place and he was long overdue a promotion from the dreary task of being Second Minister with a special responsibility for pacts and soul harvests.

Those who believe in organizing collective security by means of military pacts against a possible aggressor are particularly fond of this word.