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Crossword clues for pack

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
pack
I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a capacity/packed audience (=the largest number of people who can fit into a hall, theatre etc)
▪ The lecture attracted a capacity audience.
a pack of dogs (=a group of wild dogs or stray dogs)
▪ There are packs of wild dogs in the mountains.
a pack of liesinformal (also a tissue of lies British Englishformal) (= a lot of lies)
▪ Everything he had told me was a pack of lies.
a packed lunchBritish English, a bag/sack lunch American English (= food such as sandwiches that you take to school etc)
▪ Most of the children had brought packed lunches.
be crammed/stuffed/packed etc full of sth
▪ Ted’s workshop was crammed full of old engines.
blister pack
face pack
Home Information Pack
ice pack
lead the world/market/pack/field
▪ US companies lead the world in biotechnology.
pack a bag (=put things in it preparing to go somewhere)
▪ Mum packed a bag for a day at the beach.
pack animal
pack horse
pack ice
pack of wolves
▪ a pack of wolves
pack rat
pack trip
packed lunch
packed out
packed to the rafters (=very full)
▪ The club was packed to the rafters .
packed...overnight bag
▪ He packed an overnight bag and left.
packing case
postage and packingBrE,postage and handling American English (= the charge for packing and sending something you have bought)
▪ It’s yours for £13.99, including postage and packing.
power pack
starter pack
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
bag
▪ As she quickly packed a bag before preparing dinner, it suddenly struck her what a risk she was taking.
▪ They returned to their hotel, packed their bags, and left for Penn Station to catch a train for Washington.
▪ A third group have packed their bags and are ready to travel immediately as the snow falls.
▪ Wash them before packing into plastic bags or containers.
▪ She packed her bag together and drove like a maniac to the mikva.
▪ Then I recall that I forgot to bring it with me when I packed my bags in Boston.
▪ Break your fast and pack our bags.
▪ We can either pack up our bags or play hard.
belongings
▪ Adam packed his few belongings, then went next door and did the same for Billie.
▪ I walked down the corridors of Hard Class to my compartment, to pack my belongings.
▪ Even the tinkers camped nearby were packing up their few belongings and preparing to leave.
▪ Outsiders go home, they yelled at us over and over, until the day the missionaries started to pack their belongings.
▪ He packed his belongings, made his goodbyes, and parted from his hosts.
▪ So they packed their few belongings and rushed to southeast Washington.
▪ As she set down her cup, startling the sparrows, she thought she might even pack his belongings.
▪ Instead of trying to sort it out, he waits until I leave the house, then packs all his belongings and leaves.
book
▪ Around four o'clock I packed up my books and went into my house to wash and change.
▪ Every couple years the-urge strikes, to pack the books and unscrew the table legs and haul off to a new site.
▪ When I was well enough, I packed my clothes and books.
▪ Goldman packs his book, wall-to-wall, with wisdom born of his own 40-year-plus career.
box
▪ So I packed my plastic box, and off I went.
▪ The insignificant operated the machines, waited on customers, packed boxes, assembled products, and provided services.
▪ She can not help you pack your box at the supermarket and have a tantrum at the same time.
▪ The Halutzim were busy packing boxes, hammering nails, tying up chests, writing labels with thick pens and pencils.
▪ I visited one farm that obtained permission to convert a barn for use as a place to pack boxes.
▪ At the State House, men in their shirtsleeves were packing papers into boxes.
▪ Voluntary workers help to supervise mentally handicapped people to pack the boxes.
▪ All packed up in boxes, down in the basement.
car
▪ The grown-ups were already packing their cars in the hope of driving beyond the fog.
▪ Christine and I sat in our packed car, trying to decide where to go next.
▪ His parents packed him into the car for the trip to San Diego.
▪ We finished eating and paid the bill and said good-bye to Pepe and packed back into the car.
▪ Trains are packed like cattle cars, and shoving has become an unofficial Olympic sport.
case
▪ Then he retrieved his clothes and suitcase from the locker-room, dressed himself and packed his case.
▪ You could get what you need - pack a case.
▪ The general wards were packed with acute cases and, although I received a sympathetic ear, no one really wanted to know.
▪ She had packed two cases with clothes, towels and essentials.
▪ The sellers had agreed to sell a quantity of tinned pears which were to be packed in cases containing 30 tins each.
▪ They had delivered the correct total quantity of tins but half of them were packed in cases of 24 tins each.
▪ It was held that the contract requirement that they be packed in cases of 30 was part of the contract description.
▪ She turned away in confusion and started to pack a small case.
clothes
▪ I gave her a hand packing up her clothes and stuff.
▪ She had packed two cases with clothes, towels and essentials.
▪ She was packing away some clothes.
▪ I just ran out of the room and went to pack some clothes.
▪ I think I packed the wrong clothes.
▪ When I was well enough, I packed my clothes and books.
▪ Once you've booked your trip, don't bother packing loads of clothes.
gun
▪ He also packs a stun gun that could be used to send an electric current into any bite.
hall
▪ They returned in 1976 at the height of their fame to pack the King's Hall, Balmoral.
▪ He could pack a union hall, as no one in the seventies was supposed to be able to do.
▪ This was his Proms debut, and a packed Albert Hall was buzzing with excitement.
▪ Partygoers inside and ticket holders lined up outside the packed concert hall were outraged.
▪ Four thousand miners packed Sheffield's city hall one night that winter.
ice
▪ They transport the bodies packed in blocks of ice.
▪ Or, it could be packed in ice and flown to Boston.
lunch
▪ There was also a lecture Theatre for people who had packed lunches.
▪ Instead of having parents pack lunches, he decided the kids should get free, hot meals.
▪ We had persuaded our landladies to give us packed lunches in place of the statutory second meal.
▪ I am grateful not to have to pack lunches.
place
▪ Fernandez, a Miami native, was not packing the place every time he pitched.
punch
▪ The 40i is small but certainly packs a very special punch-a beautiful design.
▪ For the first time in a long time, an Eddie Murphy movie packs a punch.
▪ The paper is light; it doesn't pack a punch.
▪ He also packed a mean punch, according to his estranged wife Sheila.
▪ Square-cut and staid to behold, it packs a potent punch quite at odds with its looks.
▪ At last - takeaway sandwiches with flavour that packs a punch!
▪ Though it packed a stronger punch in the north-eastern states, it wreaked greater havoc in the south.
▪ The trick is to pack as much magnetic punch into as small an amount of seawater as possible.
room
▪ The trouble was, there were too many of them packed into this room.
▪ Two months ago, as many as 60 people packed the room.
▪ The audience packed this room to capacity.
▪ Men, women, and children packed into dark rooms that stank like a stable.
▪ It was sub-Post Office, supermarket, hardware store, clothes shop, newsagent's and chemist's packed into one room.
▪ At times, up to seventy iron lungs packed patient rooms, a solarium, and the hallway.
▪ He was packing in his room at the Georges V when his telephone rang.
suitcase
▪ I doubt she has ever in her life packed a suitcase!
▪ He goes to the bedroom, packs a suitcase, and leaves.
▪ Then the box was packed into a suitcase with a few clothes around it.
▪ What my wife and I like to do is pack the suitcases first.
▪ It had taken her far longer to pack her suitcases than it did to unpack them.
▪ I went on packing the suitcase.
▪ After all, he wasn't packing suitcases for fun.
▪ He had packed his suitcases with many gifts-clothes, candies and crayons, notebooks and pencils.
things
▪ One local woman had said she'd had it with Petrolia, packed up her things and headed south.
▪ In the morning I again packed up my things.
▪ She did not want to pack her few things.
▪ I do not start the tasks to make the garden flourish again, but neither do I pack my things and leave.
▪ As soon as he hung up the phone, he started to pack a few things.
▪ Marge had gone upstairs to pack her things and to go to bed.
▪ Then I hurried back to pack my things.
▪ But I knew I had done my job when a young couple saw me and started packing up their things.
wallop
▪ And the charge of the white brigade ... the wallabies that really pack a wallop.
▪ It also packs a noticeably bigger wallop at altitude.
▪ Each piece packs a wallop of crunch, and the meat is juicy and aromatic.
■ VERB
begin
▪ Round midnight, I began to pack.
▪ Some had begun to pack up their papers.
▪ Returning to her room, Ellie washed and dressed, and rather dispiritedly began to pack.
▪ The firm also began to pack bulk grocery supplies centrally at Blackfriars, using factory methods.
▪ I put the suitcase down on the other bed and began packing the contents of the drawers into it.
▪ He began to pack things into the picnic basket.
▪ When the wind rose, cold with moisture, they began to pack up their things.
▪ She flung herself into her room and began to pack frantically, wanting to cry with rage and shame.
send
▪ Referee Robert Davies sent him packing after a mass fight.
▪ Why, I would guess that after tomorrow's visit he will send you packing back off to your home.
▪ Still, his name was not there, and he was sent packing.
▪ With a shiver, Rosemary sends the girl packing with a handful of cash.
▪ They return to afflict the living, so they have to be sent packing.
▪ History says Arizona gets sent packing.
start
▪ And if Clinton wins it, George Bush can start packing his bags.
▪ Outsiders go home, they yelled at us over and over, until the day the missionaries started to pack their belongings.
▪ As soon as he hung up the phone, he started to pack a few things.
▪ But I knew I had done my job when a young couple saw me and started packing up their things.
▪ I thought I should start packing his clothes straight away but decided to wait till after the funeral.
▪ Before 8: 30, everyone starts packing up.
▪ Well, I started, but packed up when I broke a fingernail.
▪ But before anyone starts packing their bags, no date has yet been set for the trips.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be packed like sardines
▪ We were packed like sardines on the train.
▪ On the other side of the building turtles are packed like sardines into more tanks.
close/packed/crowded etc together
▪ The Beastline were standing close together, silhouetted against the sky.
▪ The main street in Lincoln is narrow, and the little houses are close together.
▪ These horses show relaxed, peaceful outlines, with friends standing particularly close together.
▪ They stood close together in silence, listening.
▪ Though they are close together on the couch, there is in fact a chasm between them.
▪ We draw close together to complete our plans.
economy size/pack
family size/pack etc
▪ A more sensitive indicator of fertility behaviour is the average completed family size of women born in the same year.
▪ Education also increases equality in the marriage relationship, giving women more control over decisions concerning family size.
▪ It has a lot to do with not making a necessity of limiting family size.
▪ The decline in the general fertility rate was matched by a reduction in family size.
▪ The good news is that in many countries the definition of what constitutes ideal family size is already evolving downward.
▪ The most immediately striking point is family size.
▪ To preserve expected standards as far as possible, marriage will be delayed and family size kept small.
▪ Women there have abortions again and again because it is the only way they can limit their family size.
full/packed/stuffed etc to the gills
▪ If Tapie was a fish he'd be stuffed to the gills this issue!
▪ It's a surprise then to find the Powerhaus pretty much packed to the gills.
pack your bags
▪ She should pack her bags and go back where she came from.
▪ Tell him that if he doesn't shape up, he can pack his bags.
▪ A third group have packed their bags and are ready to travel immediately as the snow falls.
▪ And if Clinton wins it, George Bush can start packing his bags.
▪ In March his doctor told him to pack his bags and go to sunny Arizona for a long rest.
▪ Mr Wijeratne has suggested that civilians in the area - a million of them - should pack their bags and leave.
▪ So, once again, Erhardt will be packing his bags.
▪ Then I recall that I forgot to bring it with me when I packed my bags in Boston.
▪ They packed their bags, sold the house and left me: I got that news in prison.
▪ They returned to their hotel, packed their bags, and left for Penn Station to catch a train for Washington.
packed solid
▪ The air overhead was packed solid with noise that did not move.
▪ Whalley Range was, and still is, an intensely Bohemian area packed solid with aspiring and struggling bands.
packed with/full of sth
▪ Fortunately, there are many Web sites packed full of copyright-free graphics and other components.
▪ Ragu's also packed full of other good things, like herbs and spices.
▪ They're packed full of Vitamin C to keep your eyes fresh and revitalised.
▪ This beautiful little fishing town is packed full of narrow winding cobbled streets and colourful terraced houses.
▪ This final line-up was packed full of skilled musicians, each of whom had his own musical statement to make.
▪ Zest also includes a 16 page motivation section packed full of ideas about how to get in great shape.
the joker in the pack
▪ It was I, the unexpected tenant of the empty cottage, who was the joker in the pack.
tightly/loosely/densely packed
▪ An antique Oldsmobile crawled by, its tires crackling on the sand-covered, tightly packed ground of the flat.
▪ But at first the cities simply increased in number, grew in population and became more densely packed.
▪ He gave a six-minute inaugural speech from the South Portico before a tightly packed audience.
▪ He hoped that the tightly packed deuterium atoms would be set in motion, their nuclei bumping into one another and fusing.
▪ In the first minute of the plug formation the platelets retain their granules and remain loosely packed.
▪ Now, outside tightly packed row houses in Boston, Cambridge and Somerville, the streets are strewn with debris.
▪ The functions of the buildings in their tightly packed site are difficult to determine.
▪ There is a massive file cabinet stuffed with documents so old and densely packed they may be ready to ignite spontaneously.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
Pack the knee with ice to reduce swelling.
▪ a meat packing factory
▪ Brent had to pack a suitcase and get to the airport in under an hour.
▪ Can you pack the kids' lunches?
▪ Did you remember to pack the suntan lotion?
▪ Don't forget to pack your swimming suit.
▪ More than 50,000 fans packed into the stadium.
▪ She packed her suitcase and set off for the airport.
▪ The tuna is packed in oil.
▪ Tourists in North Carolina packed ferries to flee the Outer Banks.
▪ We're going to Greece tomorrow, and I haven't started packing yet!
▪ We packed all our books into boxes.
▪ Why do you always pack at the last minute?
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Disappointment turned to disbelief among the 18,000 crowd packed into Edgbaston when they were told they would not get a refund.
▪ He arrives for class with a tiny knapsack packed with his crayons, lunch box and a diaper.
▪ He could pack a union hall, as no one in the seventies was supposed to be able to do.
▪ How could people pack and prepare a lifetime's possessions, even with six days' notice?
▪ On each of the six nights the auditorium was packed to capacity with a seating of 1,500.
▪ Saturday afternoon I realized I had packed the wrong stuff.
▪ The robber had packed himself into a carton and had himself delivered to the post office.
▪ There is a massive file cabinet stuffed with documents so old and densely packed they may be ready to ignite spontaneously.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
free
▪ The first 200 cards picked out of the bag after that date will receive a free two-roll pack.
▪ If you'd like more information on the seven car 605 range, call for a free information pack.
Free newspapers. Free amenity pack.
▪ For 1992 Dorma is offering the bride-to-be an exclusive bridal pack totally free.
▪ The campaign comprises nationwide press advertising and the production of 100,000 copies of a free information pack.
full
▪ For a full product information pack please circle the reader service number or ring our technical department on.
small
▪ On small packs with more limited space the information may be set out in linear form.
▪ It was a small pack, maybe eight beasts.
▪ This was the largest collection of these creatures Chopra had come across; normally, they hunted alone or in small packs.
▪ It's very ordinary office issue but also available in small packs for domestic use.
▪ And only the one horse and that small pack ... Thieves!
▪ Both explained that small packs of products were not only more convenient but also meant less wasted packaging.
whole
▪ Tell the Constable to lock up these vagrants overnight - the whole pack of them.
▪ It seems to me you used to get a whole pack for a quarter, and that included the gum.
▪ After one forward thrust, the whole pack collapsed to the floor.
▪ The whole pack raced behind on the scent of the fox.
▪ Away from the whole pack of them.
▪ So off went Will Perdue and in came what could have been a whole pack of trouble in Rodman.
■ NOUN
action
▪ Organiser Rose Cuthbertson said the show would be followed up with teachers' action packs and practical workshop sessions on the environment.
▪ Your Evening News/Media Action pack includes: Basic self-help for day-time drowsiness.
animal
▪ Any pack animals the adventurers have may get restless and skittish.
▪ The findings throw fresh light on the camel's former popularity both as pack animal and military mount.
▪ There are no porters or pack animals in the region, and so all supplies were ferried in by regular helicopter deliveries.
▪ Her steward walked from the place where the pack animals were tethered, a paper parasol in one hand.
▪ The man was at the far end of a line of slowly moving pack animals, and he had not noticed anything.
battery
▪ It can run off a rechargeable battery pack.
▪ Patients can wear a battery pack or plug into an electrical outlet to recharge the heart's battery.
▪ Layout of components inside the case showing position of the battery pack.
▪ After the rehearsal the sound engineer gave me a battery pack and microphone to attach to my evening gown.
▪ As well as a steel carrying case, the drill comes with battery pack, charger, chuck key and a double-ended screwdriver bit.
cigarette
▪ He fished out his crumpled cigarette pack and lit up.
▪ So the red lighter and cigarette pack had just been props for the pub scene.
▪ Campaigners, for example, are demanding strong warnings on cigarette packs.
face
▪ Place wine in microwave and frozen fish in freezer, take all your clothes off and apply face pack whilst running bath.
horse
▪ There are many pack horse trails recorded in this area.
▪ I crossed over the little pack horse bridge.
ice
▪ He says didn't realise it was so serious and sent him back to class with an ice pack.
▪ After the game, Mutombo looked relieved to be sitting in a folding chair with ice packs surrounding both knees.
▪ Through the ice pack off Murmansk.
▪ If the plots get any hotter, Jez Quigley will be pushing ice packs.
information
▪ For a full product information pack please circle the reader service number or ring our technical department on.
▪ Details and information pack can be obtained by telephoning or writing to the Catholic Social Welfare Society.
▪ If you'd like more information on the seven car 605 range, call for a free information pack.
▪ This policy was included in the mid-March information pack.
▪ Ring for a Western Loire information pack and the Brittany Ferries brochure.
▪ These observations and facts come from an information pack about National Bike Week, recently published.
▪ Write or call now for a comprehensive information pack or to arrange a showhouse visit.
▪ Farmers should ask for our special Finance for Farming information pack.
power
▪ Bolstering the deal with 13 new Pegasus power packs pushed the shares up 5p to 114p.
▪ Sometimes I am a real power pack of efficiency; then I hit a bad patch.
rat
▪ I suspected they were pack rats because they were too smart to get themselves caught in the traps I set for them.
starter
▪ A starter pack of course material and a three-year development programme are part of the package.
▪ The starter pack included a free school tie, stationery set and complimentary sports insurance.
wolf
▪ Like a wolf pack scenting easy prey, they dismounted and spread out.
▪ A few minutes ago we discovered the fresh tracks of a wolf pack.
years
▪ Two of three women with adenocarcinoma had accumulated more than 45 pack years each and one was also a heavy drinker.
■ VERB
buy
▪ Parked it to buy a pack of cigarettes - the car was stolen by a couple of kids going joy-riding.
▪ I wanted to buy a special begging pack for him, and keep it in the glove box.
▪ One tube costs just 60p - or buy a triple pack for £1.55.
▪ I bought a pack each for them; they thanked me.
▪ I bought a pack of cigarettes - the brand an indistinguishable smear- and lit one up.
▪ You can also buy special packs of edible egg colourings from some supermarkets and craft shops.
hunt
▪ He attacked the lobby system of political reporting and the increased tendency for critics to hunt as a pack.
▪ Coyotes hunt in packs when their food is deer but hunt alone when their food is mice.
▪ These were the first examples my research threw up, which leads me to wonder why the letter H hunts in packs.
▪ Mobs hunted in packs, smashing windows and looting goods.
▪ While they're suitably snotty, they don't hunt in packs - we're not talking Axi Rose's scapegoats here.
▪ They hunted in packs, and were individually from two to three metres long.
include
▪ The full text of the Solicitors' Incorporated Practice Rules 1988 is included in this pack, together with an introduction.
▪ The package includes a pack of cards and a booklet which has a riddle running through its pages.
▪ Again, instructions should be included in the pack.
lead
▪ With 16 laps to go Mr Mansell was leading the pack.
▪ I took the lead and led the pack back to Leander.
▪ Distributor Miramax, which led the pack with 20 nominations, is an autonomous unit of the Walt Disney Co.
▪ Ian led the pack in fine style, well supported by second rower Warren Aspinall until he retired with a damaged shoulder.
▪ Older people, in fact, are leading the computer-using pack.
▪ Primary issuance is expected to gain pace starting this week, with Dean Witter, Discover leading the pack.
▪ Dallas-based Centex Real Estate Corp. is leading the high-tech pack.
pick
▪ Beaten 21-6 by Swansea on Wednesday, the world champions have reacted by picking virtually their Test-strength pack.
▪ At about two o'clock, we picked up our packs and trudged off.
▪ I picked up my pack, slung it over my shoulder and crossed the little bridge over the burn.
▪ And I picked up a pack of contraceptives.
produce
▪ I will produce a practical resource pack for both posts. 3.
▪ National Office was producing new packs as soon as possible and these would be distributed free to tutors.
▪ The Energy Efficiency Office has produced an information pack containing details of how your business can improve its energy efficiency.
receive
▪ The first 200 cards picked out of the bag after that date will receive a free two-roll pack.
▪ If you don't want to receive a pack, just tell us.
▪ Children can also join the Cox Club and receive a special pack of goodies, including a badge and an apple poster.
▪ A hundred runners-up will each receive a pack of Tetley Tea and a Tetley Teafolk biscuit tin.
▪ New account holders will receive their opening pack immediately, to be followed a few days later by their Route Seventeen Card.
send
▪ Some three weeks later they are still responding to queries and will continue to send out packs.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
close/packed/crowded etc together
▪ The Beastline were standing close together, silhouetted against the sky.
▪ The main street in Lincoln is narrow, and the little houses are close together.
▪ These horses show relaxed, peaceful outlines, with friends standing particularly close together.
▪ They stood close together in silence, listening.
▪ Though they are close together on the couch, there is in fact a chasm between them.
▪ We draw close together to complete our plans.
economy size/pack
family size/pack etc
▪ A more sensitive indicator of fertility behaviour is the average completed family size of women born in the same year.
▪ Education also increases equality in the marriage relationship, giving women more control over decisions concerning family size.
▪ It has a lot to do with not making a necessity of limiting family size.
▪ The decline in the general fertility rate was matched by a reduction in family size.
▪ The good news is that in many countries the definition of what constitutes ideal family size is already evolving downward.
▪ The most immediately striking point is family size.
▪ To preserve expected standards as far as possible, marriage will be delayed and family size kept small.
▪ Women there have abortions again and again because it is the only way they can limit their family size.
pack your bags
▪ She should pack her bags and go back where she came from.
▪ Tell him that if he doesn't shape up, he can pack his bags.
▪ A third group have packed their bags and are ready to travel immediately as the snow falls.
▪ And if Clinton wins it, George Bush can start packing his bags.
▪ In March his doctor told him to pack his bags and go to sunny Arizona for a long rest.
▪ Mr Wijeratne has suggested that civilians in the area - a million of them - should pack their bags and leave.
▪ So, once again, Erhardt will be packing his bags.
▪ Then I recall that I forgot to bring it with me when I packed my bags in Boston.
▪ They packed their bags, sold the house and left me: I got that news in prison.
▪ They returned to their hotel, packed their bags, and left for Penn Station to catch a train for Washington.
packed solid
▪ The air overhead was packed solid with noise that did not move.
▪ Whalley Range was, and still is, an intensely Bohemian area packed solid with aspiring and struggling bands.
packed with/full of sth
▪ Fortunately, there are many Web sites packed full of copyright-free graphics and other components.
▪ Ragu's also packed full of other good things, like herbs and spices.
▪ They're packed full of Vitamin C to keep your eyes fresh and revitalised.
▪ This beautiful little fishing town is packed full of narrow winding cobbled streets and colourful terraced houses.
▪ This final line-up was packed full of skilled musicians, each of whom had his own musical statement to make.
▪ Zest also includes a 16 page motivation section packed full of ideas about how to get in great shape.
send sb packing
▪ Dozens of workers were sent packing because of harsh new environmental rules.
the joker in the pack
▪ It was I, the unexpected tenant of the empty cottage, who was the joker in the pack.
tightly/loosely/densely packed
▪ An antique Oldsmobile crawled by, its tires crackling on the sand-covered, tightly packed ground of the flat.
▪ But at first the cities simply increased in number, grew in population and became more densely packed.
▪ He gave a six-minute inaugural speech from the South Portico before a tightly packed audience.
▪ He hoped that the tightly packed deuterium atoms would be set in motion, their nuclei bumping into one another and fusing.
▪ In the first minute of the plug formation the platelets retain their granules and remain loosely packed.
▪ Now, outside tightly packed row houses in Boston, Cambridge and Somerville, the streets are strewn with debris.
▪ The functions of the buildings in their tightly packed site are difficult to determine.
▪ There is a massive file cabinet stuffed with documents so old and densely packed they may be ready to ignite spontaneously.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a video gift pack
▪ Susan took a mint out of the pack.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ He pulled a pack of Tareytons out and lit one.
▪ I set up the bottle on the bedside table and a fresh pack of cigarettes.
▪ If the pack has become too big and unmanageable, the dominant male must spend all his time trying to control it.
▪ In 1938, a flood wiped out many of the camps, diminishing the need for the pack trains.
▪ It was full of people strangely dressed in plus fours and navy blue suits, with packs strapped to their backs.
▪ No hyena wants to fight outside the pack.
▪ Then, as you listen closely, you hear an answering pack from a distant ridge.
▪ This month will see the launch of the Coldwatch campaign and details can be found in this newsletter together with the pack.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Pack

Pack \Pack\ (p[a^]k), n. [Cf. Pact.] A pact. [Obs.]
--Daniel.

Pack

Pack \Pack\, n. [Akin to D. pak, G. pack, Dan. pakke, Sw. packa, Icel. pakki, Gael. & Ir. pac, Arm. pak. Cf. Packet.]

  1. A bundle made up and prepared to be carried; especially, a bundle to be carried on the back; a load for an animal; a bale, as of goods.
    --Piers Plowman.

  2. [Cf. Peck, n.] A number or quantity equal to the contents of a pack; hence, a multitude; a burden. ``A pack of sorrows.'' ``A pack of blessings.''
    --Shak.

    Note: ``In England, by a pack of meal is meant 280 lbs.; of wool, 240 lbs.''
    --McElrath.

  3. A group or quantity of connected or similar things; as, a pack of lies; specifically:

    1. A full set of playing cards; a deck; also, the assortment used in a particular game; as, a euchre pack.

    2. A number of wolves, hounds or dogs, hunting or kept together; as, a wolf pack.

    3. A number of persons associated or leagued in a bad design or practice; a gang; as, a pack of thieves or knaves.

    4. A shook of cask staves.

    5. A bundle of sheet-iron plates for rolling simultaneously.

  4. A large area of floating pieces of ice driven together more or less closely.
    --Kane.

  5. An envelope, or wrapping, of sheets used in hydropathic practice, called dry pack, wet pack, cold pack, etc., according to the method of treatment.

  6. [Prob. the same word; but cf. AS. p[=ae]can to deceive.] A loose, lewd, or worthless person. See Baggage. [Obs.]
    --Skelton.

  7. (Med.) In hydropathic practice, a wrapping of blankets or sheets called dry pack, wet pack, cold pack, etc., according to the condition of the blankets or sheets used, put about a patient to give him treatment; also, the fact or condition of being so treated.

  8. (Rugby Football) The forwards who compose one half of the scrummage; also, the scrummage.

    Pack animal, an animal, as a horse, mule, etc., employed in carrying packs.

    Pack and prime road or Pack and prime way, a pack road or bridle way.

    Pack cloth, a coarse cloth, often duck, used in covering packs or bales.

    Pack horse. See Pack animal (above).

    Pack ice. See def. 4, above.

    Pack moth (Zo["o]l.), a small moth ( Anacampsis sarcitella) which, in the larval state, is very destructive to wool and woolen fabrics.

    Pack needle, a needle for sewing with pack thread.
    --Piers Plowman.

    Pack saddle, a saddle made for supporting the load on a pack animal.
    --Shak.

    Pack staff, a staff for supporting a pack; a peddler's staff.

    Pack train (Mil.), a troop of pack animals.

Pack

Pack \Pack\, v. i.

  1. To make up packs, bales, or bundles; to stow articles securely for transportation.

  2. To admit of stowage, or of making up for transportation or storage; to become compressed or to settle together, so as to form a compact mass; as, the goods pack conveniently; wet snow packs well.

  3. To gather in flocks or schools; as, the grouse or the perch begin to pack. [Eng.]

  4. To depart in haste; -- generally with off or away.

    Poor Stella must pack off to town
    --Swift.

    You shall pack, And never more darken my doors again.
    --Tennyson.

  5. To unite in bad measures; to confederate for ill purposes; to join in collusion. [Obs.] ``Go pack with him.''
    --Shak.

    To send packing, to drive away; to send off roughly or in disgrace; to dismiss unceremoniously. ``The parliament . . . presently sent him packing.''
    --South.

Pack

Pack \Pack\ (p[a^]k), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Packed (p[a^]kt); p. pr. & vb. n. Packing.] [Akin to D. pakken, G. packen, Dan. pakke, Sw. packa, Icel. pakka. See Pack, n.]

  1. To make a pack of; to arrange closely and securely in a pack; hence, to place and arrange compactly as in a pack; to press into close order or narrow compass; as, to pack goods in a box; to pack fish.

    Strange materials packed up with wonderful art.
    --Addison.

    Where . . . the bones Of all my buried ancestors are packed.
    --Shak.

  2. To fill in the manner of a pack, that is, compactly and securely, as for transportation; hence, to fill closely or to repletion; to stow away within; to cause to be full; to crowd into; as, to pack a trunk; the play, or the audience, packs the theater.

  3. To shuffle, sort and arrange (the cards) in a pack so as to secure the game unfairly; to stack[3] (the deck).

    And mighty dukes pack cards for half a crown.
    --Pope.

  4. Hence: To bring together or make up unfairly and fraudulently, in order to secure a certain result; to stack[3]; as, to pack a jury or a caucus.

    The expected council was dwindling into . . . a packed assembly of Italian bishops.
    --Atterbury.

  5. To contrive unfairly or fraudulently; to plot. [Obs.]

    He lost life . . . upon a nice point subtilely devised and packed by his enemies.
    --Fuller.

  6. To load with a pack; hence, to load; to encumber; as, to pack a horse.

    Our thighs packed with wax, our mouths with honey.
    --Shack.

  7. To cause to go; to send away with baggage or belongings; esp., to send away peremptorily or suddenly; to send packing; -- sometimes with off; as, to pack a boy off to school.

    He . . . must not die Till George be packed with post horse up to heaven.
    --Shak.

  8. To transport in a pack, or in the manner of a pack (i. e., on the backs of men or beasts). [Western U.S.]

  9. (Hydropathy) To envelop in a wet or dry sheet, within numerous coverings. See Pack, n., 5.

  10. (Mech.) To render impervious, as by filling or surrounding with suitable material, or to fit or adjust so as to move without giving passage to air, water, or steam; as, to pack a joint; to pack the piston of a steam engine.

  11. To cover, envelop, or protect tightly with something; specif. (Hydropathy), to envelop in a wet or dry sheet, within numerous coverings.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
pack

"bundle," early 13c., probably from a Low German word (compare Middle Dutch pac, pack "bundle," Middle Low German pak, Middle Flemish pac, attested from late 12c.), originally a term of wool traders in Flanders; or possibly from Old Norse pakki. All are of unknown origin.\n

\nItalian pacco is a Dutch loan word; French pacque probably is from Flemish. Meaning "set of persons" (usually of a low character) is c.1300, older than sense of "group of hunting animals" (early 15c.). Extended to collective sets of playing cards (1590s), floating ice (1791), cigarettes (1924), and submarines (1943). Meaning "knapsack on a frame" is attested from 1916. Pack of lies first attested 1763.

pack

c.1300, "to put together in a pack," from pack (n.), possibly influenced by Anglo-French empaker (late 13c.) and Medieval Latin paccare "pack."\n

\nSome senses suggesting "make secret arrangement" are from an Elizabethan mispronunciation of pact. Sense of "to carry or convey in a pack" (1805) led to general sense of "to carry in any manner;" hence to pack heat "carry a gun," underworld slang from 1940s; "to be capable of delivering" (a punch, etc.), from 1921. Related: Packed; packing.

Wiktionary
pack

n. 1 A bundle made up and prepared to be carried; especially, a bundle to be carried on the back; a load for an animal; a bale, as of goods. 2 A number or quantity equal to the contents of a pack; hence, a multitude; a burden. 3 A number or quantity of connected or similar things; a collective. 4 A full set of playing cards; also, the assortment used in a particular game; as, a euchre pack. 5 A number of hounds or dogs, hunting or kept together. 6 A number of persons associated or leagued in a bad design or practice; a gang; 7 A group of Cub Scouts. 8 A shook of cask staves. 9 A bundle of sheet-iron plates for rolling simultaneously. 10 A large area of floating pieces of ice driven together more or less closely. 11 (context medicine English) An envelope, or wrapping, of sheets used in hydropathic practice, called ''dry pack'', ''wet pack'', ''cold pack'', etc., according to the method of treatment. 12 (context slang English): A loose, lewd, or worthless person. 13 (context snooker pool English) A tight group of object balls in cue sports. Usually the reds in snooker. 14 (context rugby English) The team on the field. vb. 1 (label en physical) To put or bring things together in a limited or confined space, especially for storage or transport. 2 # (label en transitive) To make a pack of; to arrange closely and securely in a pack; hence, to place and arrange compactly as in a pack; to press into close order or narrow compass. 3 # (label en transitive) To fill in the manner of a pack, that is, compactly and securely, as for transportation; hence, to fill closely or to repletion; to stow away within; to cause to be full; to crowd into.

WordNet
pack
  1. n. a large indefinite number; "a battalion of ants"; "a multitude of TV antennas"; "a plurality of religions" [syn: battalion, large number, multitude, plurality]

  2. a complete collection of similar things

  3. a small parcel (as of cigarettes or film)

  4. an association of criminals; "police tried to break up the gang"; "a pack of thieves" [syn: gang, ring, mob]

  5. an exclusive circle of people with a common purpose [syn: clique, coterie, ingroup, inner circle, camp]

  6. a group of hunting animals

  7. a cream that cleanses and tones the skin [syn: face pack]

  8. a sheet or blanket (either dry or wet) to wrap around the body for its therapeutic effect

  9. a bundle (especially one carried on the back)

pack
  1. v. arrange in a container; "pack the books into the boxes" [ant: unpack]

  2. fill to capacity; "This singer always packs the concert halls"; "They murder trial packed the court house"

  3. compress into a wad; "wad paper into the box" [syn: bundle, wad, compact]

  4. carry, as on one's back; "Pack your tents to the top of the mountain"

  5. set up a committee or legislative body with one's own supporters so as to influence the outcome; "pack a jury"

  6. have with oneself; have on one's person; "She always takes an umbrella"; "I always carry money"; "She packs a gun when she goes into the mountains" [syn: carry, take]

  7. press tightly together or cram; "The crowd packed the auditorium" [syn: throng, mob, pile, jam]

  8. hike with a backpack; "Every summer they are backpacking in the Rockies" [syn: backpack]

  9. press down tightly; "tamp the coffee grinds in the container to make espresso" [syn: tamp down, tamp]

  10. seal with packing; "pack the faucet"

  11. have the property of being packable or compactable or of compacting easily; "This powder compacts easily"; "Such odd-shaped items do not pack well" [syn: compact]

  12. load with a pack [syn: load down]

  13. treat the body or any part of it by wrapping it, as with blankets or sheets, and applying compresses to it, or stuffing it to provide cover, containment, or therapy, or to absorb blood; "The nurse packed gauze in the wound"; "You had better pack your swollen ankle with ice"

Wikipedia
Pack (canine)

Pack is a social group of conspecific canids. Not all species of canids form packs; for example, small canids like the red fox do not. Pack size and social behaviour within packs varies across species.

Pack (compression)

Pack is a (now deprecated) Unix shell compression program based on Huffman coding.

The unpack utility will restore files to their original state after they have been compressed using the pack utility. If no files are specified, the standard input will be uncompressed to the standard output.

Although obsolete, support for pack'd files exists in modern compression tools such as gzip and 7-zip.

Pack

Pack or packs may refer to:

  • Backpack
  • Cigarette pack
  • Cub scouts group, or a group or gang in a larger sense, as in Leader of the Pack
  • Expansion pack, a video game needing another one to be played
  • Moving company, an organization that loads goods into containers and then transports them
  • Pack (aircraft), P.A.C.K (Pneumatic Air Cycle Kit), a kit containing an air cycle machine that provides air conditioning as part of an aircraft's environmental control system
  • Pack (canine), family structure of wild animals of the biological family Canidae
  • pack (compression), a UNIX utility to compress files using Huffman encoding
  • Pack hunter, other animals that hunt in a group
  • Peloton
  • Playing cards pack
  • Tourism

Usage examples of "pack".

February 20, Garner convened two days of closed-door meetings in a packed amphitheater at Fort McNair, the stately home of the National Defense University, abutting the Potomac River in Washington.

Were I to accede to this I might as well pack up at once and go and live on a farm a hundred leagues from Paris.

Beside myself with rage, blushing for very shame, seeing but too late the fault I had committed by accepting the society of a scoundrel, I went up to my room, and hurriedly packed up my carpet-bag.

And although she had worked to wrest control of the shifter pack from his nephew Acier, in the end Acier had been victorious.

Here am I with a pack of villains on my hands and no way to convict them of tinkering with the water adjutages, let alone treason!

There were so many packs of two-legs about, afoot and riding the hard-footed four-legs, that they could not say whether any they knew of were the one he sought.

Unhitching her mare, Aganippe went out with the dog pack, running down several hares and a big ground-dwelling bustard.

At night, when everybody was asleep, he and the famous airman Lyapidevsky found and rescued the Chelyuskin expedition, and with Vodopyanov he landed heavy aircraft on the pack ice at the North Pole, arid with Chkalov opened the unexplored air route to the United States across the Pole.

Shere Khan was always crossing his path in the jungle, for as Akela grew older and feebler the lame tiger had come to be great friends with the younger wolves of the Pack, who followed him for scraps, a thing Akela would never have allowed if he had dared to push his authority to the proper bounds.

It is in my heart that when Akela misses his next kill,--and at each hunt it costs him more to pin the buck,--the Pack will turn against him and against thee.

Ever since Akela had been deposed, the Pack had been without a leader, hunting and fighting at their own pleasure.

My nurse said the Alaunt were a pack of enchanted hounds who hunted down humans.

The Alaunt were a well-trained, well-disciplined pack, and answered instantly whenever Azhure spoke to them.

I saw one of them, but he was deep down, amongst the pack of lumbering Albacore sharks.

Moving his saddle and pack onto Patch, Alec slung his bow over one shoulder and followed Seregil onto the Cirna highroad.