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oaks

n. (plural of oak English)

Gazetteer
Oaks, MO -- U.S. village in Missouri
Population (2000): 136
Housing Units (2000): 57
Land area (2000): 0.095161 sq. miles (0.246465 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 0.095161 sq. miles (0.246465 sq. km)
FIPS code: 53804
Located within: Missouri (MO), FIPS 29
Location: 39.196952 N, 94.572108 W
ZIP Codes (1990):
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Oaks, MO
Oaks
Oaks, OK -- U.S. town in Oklahoma
Population (2000): 412
Housing Units (2000): 137
Land area (2000): 1.608302 sq. miles (4.165484 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 1.608302 sq. miles (4.165484 sq. km)
FIPS code: 53550
Located within: Oklahoma (OK), FIPS 40
Location: 36.165583 N, 94.853475 W
ZIP Codes (1990): 74359
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Oaks, OK
Oaks
Wikipedia
Oaks

Oaks may refer to:

Oaks (greyhounds)

The Oaks is an original classic greyhound competition, now held at Belle Vue Stadium. It was run at White City Stadium from 1927 until 1958, it moved to Harringay Stadium in 1959–1987 and then to Wimbledon Stadium in 1988. In 2013 the Greyhound Racing Association decided to move the event to sister track Belle Vue.

Oaks (Irish greyhounds)

The Oaks is a greyhound racing competition held annually at Clonmel Greyhound Stadium in Clonmel, County Tipperary, Ireland.

It is a original classic competition in the Irish racing greyhound racing calendar and was inaugurated in 1932 following the decision by the Irish Coursing Club to issue a new list of classic races.

The event was shared around several tracks in Ireland starting with Clonmel Greyhound Stadium from 1932-1933 and then the two Dublin venues of Shelbourne Park and Harold's Cross Stadium. Before World War II the old Cork (Western Road) Greyhound Stadium and Limerick Greyhound Stadium also both hosted the competition.

After the war Shelbourne Park and Harold's Cross both shared the race until sole control was taken by Shelbourne Park in 1992.

Usage examples of "oaks".

Will through the deep snow, among great beeches and oaks bare of leaves.

Chelford told me that one of the London people said he thought Five Oaks belonged to me absolutely.

Of course the lady saw that lank and sinister man of God quite distinctly, but she did not choose to do so, and Larkin, with a grand sort of prescience, foresaw a county feud between the Houses of Five Oaks and Brandon, and now the lady had vanished.

Larkin had driven off early to Five Oaks, to make inspection of his purchase.

He dined like a king in disguise, at the humble little hostelry of Naunton Friars, and returned in the twilight to the Lodge, which he would make the dower-house of Five Oaks, with the Howard shield over the door.

The trustees of Wylder, a minor, tried, as they were advised they must, his title to Five Oaks, by ejectment.

I apologize for the squeeze, but right after we spoke, I hadda call from some guy down in Thousand Oaks needs an estimate on his roof.

Duncan Oaks showed up in a number of photographs, dark-haired and handsome.

Now that was interesting: Duncan Oaks and Benny Quintero had played the same position on opposing teams.

If Duncan Oaks was the hub, maybe Mark Bethel was the axle driving subsequent events.

Before my plane the next morning, I put in a call to Porter Yount, asking if he could lay his hands on the columns Duncan Oaks had written before he went to Vietnam.

Argus smoothed it skilfully, and they set it upon that rugged hill beneath a canopy of lofty oaks, which of all trees have their roots deepest.

Looking down from the stilts of seven hundred feet into the deep coombe of black oaks standing in the white snow, day by day, built round about with the rugged mound of the hills, doubly locked with the key of frost--it seemed to me to take on itself the actuality of the ancient faith of the Magi.

In this deep coombe, amid the dark oaks and snow, was the fable of Zoroaster.

In the quiet of the Sunday afternoon, when the clashing of the bells was stilled, there walked in the shade of the oaks a young priest and a lady.