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Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

neep

"a turnip," Scottish and dialectal, from Middle English nepe, from Old English næp "turnip," from Latin napus (see turnip).

Wiktionary

neep

n. (context chiefly Scotland English) The swede (rutabaga), called "turnip" in Scotland.

Usage examples of "neep".

Mala Fortuna solo knows what he managed to get out of him before Neep and Cleep pushed in beside them and shut the dribble down.

Roots like tatties and neeps were cheap enough, too, and cabbage, and onionseven old Kalchan had those at the inn.

Nessa clucked and tutted at her while she leaned out over the parapet, passing her a bowl containing her one meal of the dayboiled neeps and flat bread.

A plate piled high with Munkiore and mashed neeps was set before him, along with a mug of small beer.

The sheets of paper covered with writing over which old Nept had bent his back, having taken it into his head to learn to write in his declining years, began whirling about in mid-air.

No sooner had the coloured, swirling cloud risen up before his eyes than he managed to dive into a disused shaft in which Nept had worked all his life and over which, when it was exhausted, he had built his own cabin.

They plumped down after minimal vocal greetings to Jack, Rogi, and the CE operators and fell like wolves upon the roast lamb with rosemary-anchovy sauce, bashed neeps, and butter-drenched baked potatoes.

If you are so rash as to make an attempt upon her - if you creep up in the whale-boat and strike your harpoon home, she will bash the boat like a bowl of neeps as she sounds, maybe, and in any case she will run out your two-hundred-fathom whale-line in less than a minute - you bend on another as quick as you can - she runs it out - another, and still she runs.