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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

neck

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a crick in your back/neck
▪ He was getting a crick in his neck from leaning out of the window for so long.
cowl neck
craned his neck
▪ He craned his neck above the crowd to get a better view.
crew neck
knee/neck/hip/elbow etc joint
▪ a permanently damaged knee joint
neck/back/knee brace (=a brace that supports the neck etc)
▪ He was being fitted for a back brace.
paralysed from the neck/chest/waist down
polo neck
▪ a polo-neck sweater
put yourself/your neck on the line (for sb) (=risk something bad happening to you)
▪ I’ve already put myself on the line for you once, and I’m not going to do it again.
risk...neck (=risk my life)
▪ I’m not going to risk my neck just to save a common criminal.
scoop neck
stiff neck/back/joint etc
▪ Alastair woke with a stiff neck.
the...nape of...neck
the soft warm nape of her neck
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
long
▪ The ostrich, anxious to join in the fun again, craned his long neck well forward over the boundary fence.
▪ The older woman had a lean face, a long neck, and an aquiline nose.
▪ Show your legs at every opportunity Or your upper arms, your long neck or be taken in by fashion.
▪ I held Ellie in my peripheral vision, watching her long neck and the swell of her chest from across the room.
▪ Her oval face with its large dark eyes and high forehead was set on a long, graceful neck.
▪ Her Dose is slender, aquiline, her long neck elegant, chin delicate.
▪ Use the remaining marzipan to model a head with a long neck.
▪ I stare at them and see her beautiful body, her long, slender neck and arms.
open
▪ It had been split open from neck to crotch.
▪ He was wearing an open neck designer type long sleeve shirt and dark trousers.
▪ Her silk blouse is open at the neck, showing two strands of pearls.
▪ There was no tie, but a dark red silk scarf was tucked into the open neck of the shirt.
▪ Above the open neck of his white cotton shirt, a few dark hairs curled.
round
▪ Design: round neck, long sleeve top and long johns, women's and men's designs available.
▪ With its pretty round neck, softly padded shoulders and front-pocket detail, it looks great worn with a skirt or trousers.
▪ A simple round neck style with wrist length sleeves it makes the perfect foil for a favourite scarf or piece of jewellery.
▪ A Crêpe-de-chine T-Top blouse with cap sleeves and a round neck bound in self cloth.
▪ For a round neck, join one shoulder seam before estimating.
▪ For a round neck, the band can be single or double thickness but a V-neck band can only be single thickness.
▪ She had tried to soften the effect of long sleeves and a high round neck with a pair of pearl stud earrings.
▪ Knit two rows and bind off for a round neck or cast off for a V-neck.
stiff
▪ The stiff neck is a way of controlling feeling as are the rigid shoulders and the pulled-in gut.
▪ Rarely, a subarachnoid bleed can present with high fever, stiff neck, and headache masquerading as meningitis.
▪ Sore throat with swollen glands and a stiff neck.
▪ In the morning he woke up with a painful stiff neck.
▪ A stiff neck for a few weeks after a bump was tolerated in the past.
▪ Can you watch television without getting a stiff neck?
▪ She was suffering from a stiff neck which gave her pain whenever she turned her head.
▪ Other signs of tension and fear are a tight mouth, stiff neck, and flared nostrils.
■ NOUN
injury
▪ Several congressmen went home with black eyes and serious neck injuries.
▪ Lancashire will make a late fitness check on Orrell hooker Neil Hitchen, who is recovering from a neck injury.
▪ Those taken to hospital were suffering from neck injuries caused by whiplash.
▪ Mr Quinn, 55, suffered 33 rib fractures, serious damage to internal organs and severe head and neck injuries.
▪ The lorry driver suffered serious leg and neck injuries.
▪ Pilot Stephen Grey was unhurt apart from a minor neck injury which hospitalised him for a short period.
maple
▪ A neat touch is the central laminate of the maple necks.
▪ The maple neck has 22 frets inlaid in a rosewood fingerboard.
muscle
▪ At the same time she could feel her neck muscles being strained.
▪ Surgical therapy has been attempted by section of various neck muscles or the accessory nerve.
▪ Gosse had been watching all in silence, his jaw clenched, his neck muscles taut.
▪ Tony smiled and without moving his left knee dodged the blows, his torso jinking, neck muscles popping.
▪ Francesca's neck muscles tensed every time she took a breath and her nostrils dilated.
▪ The high rate of acceleration strained her neck muscles.
▪ This exercise relaxes the neck muscles and relieves tension.
▪ We stood there a long time watching, heads tipped back, neck muscles beginning to ache.
■ VERB
break
▪ Diane 37 broke her neck in a fall from a horse and it was feared she might never walk again.
▪ The star of nearly 400 Western movies lay dead of a broken neck.
▪ This was where Jackson's enemies needed to break the neck of his campaign.
▪ I thought I was going to break my neck before I ever hit the ground.
▪ Tolby said nothing about Arabella because Lorton threatened to break his neck if he did.
▪ He yelled at us when we ran downstairs, believing we would fall and break our necks and die on the landing.
▪ Eventually, Lennie's strength becomes too much for him, and he breaks a woman's neck accidentally.
▪ Then 4 seasons ago, he broke his neck in a club game.
breathe
▪ As they rounded the last corner the leaders had the main field breathing down their necks.
▪ At last Nahat was up against the backdrop with the spotlight breathing down his neck.
▪ It was a troubled film, directed by Sam Peckinpah who constantly had the Columbia Studio brass breathing down his neck.
▪ To have some one breathing down your neck in your senior year is not a happy prospect.
▪ I've got Rawlinson breathing down my neck already, as well as brigade orders every day.
▪ Some of us need bosses and editors breathing fire down our necks.
▪ Labour and the Liberal Democrats are breathing down his neck.
▪ To shoot birdies like that with Nicklaus breathing down your neck - - twice!
crane
▪ The ostrich, anxious to join in the fun again, craned his long neck well forward over the boundary fence.
▪ By craning his neck, Gao Yang caught a glimpse of sky through a fork in the branches.
▪ The rest of the audience cranes its collective neck to spot the guilty party.
▪ A boy pushed his head through the opening and craned his neck to see into the room.
▪ A small crowd had gathered, craning their necks towards David, and muttering.
▪ I say, craning my neck from the corner.
▪ They stood in a tight bunch and craned their necks to see what was causing the commotion.
▪ Grover craned his solid neck up, then down.
hang
▪ A jade-green pendant on a chain was hanging around her neck.
▪ It comes with a gold medal that kids can hang around their necks.
▪ They shuffled forward in a dazed manner holding hands, their labels hanging round their necks.
▪ From time to time, she fingered the heart pendant and religious medallion that now hang around her neck.
▪ Harrison didn't exactly avoid us, but he made it clear that we were not to hang around his neck.
▪ Rincewind looked down at the iconograph, still hanging around his neck.
▪ I certainly don't want you hanging around my neck, if that's what's worrying you.
▪ But don't underestimate the impact of the sartorial noose that hangs around your neck.
hung
▪ His badge of office, a large gold key, hung round his neck on a silk ribbon.
▪ The deer had cooled and now hung disrobed, its neck taught, snout averted as though having heard its name.
▪ She wore a flowered smock, and her spectacles hung round her neck on a cord.
▪ Her spectacles still hung from her neck.
▪ When I climbed the magnolia I'd hung it round my neck for safety.
▪ It hung from my neck secured by a length of dressing-gown cord.
▪ Every morning the monocle is hung round my neck and remains there until bedtime.
▪ Her hand strayed to the key that hung around her neck.
kiss
▪ He murmured small endearments as he kissed her neck and nuzzled her ears.
▪ For Norricker walked behind her and kissed her on the neck and shoulders.
▪ I let him loosen my tie and kiss my neck.
▪ After emerging from customs he dropped his bags, took his woman by the waist and hungrily kissed her mouth and neck.
▪ Jay penned her in, one hand on each arm rest and kissed her neck.
▪ She kissed him on the neck.
risk
▪ It is years since I risked my neck.
▪ On another occasion Moore, notoriously edgy about risking his neck, had to film with crocodiles in the Everglades.
▪ With prize money declining, he laments that most of the time jump jockeys risk their necks for £150.
save
▪ We then make the necessary economies and redundancies in their company, and save Sarah Chester's neck.
▪ Did he give it to save his own neck?
▪ The coward choked out that you were still alive and hadn't been harmed, but it didn't save his neck.
▪ That I tell lies, Fran, to save my neck?
▪ I find that totally objectionable from a Government who are shaping up to borrow and spend to save their necks.
stick
▪ You don't have to stick your neck out in meetings.
▪ The experts avoid sticking their own necks out.
▪ He'd stuck his neck out all right, but not as much as he'd led Holman to believe.
▪ She listened to his ideas, had even stuck her neck out to champion some of his more radical plans.
▪ And many economists are reluctant to stick their necks out.
▪ Let Bixby stick his neck out for once, he thought as he stared wearily at his folded hands.
▪ So I have decided to stick my neck out and to make some predictions for the next 30 years.
▪ I want to stick my neck out and help her.
stretch
▪ People before have stretched their necks towards them, like you, wonder-gazing children not able to sleep.
▪ His smallest robot is bigger than a man; the largest is two-stories high when it stretches its neck.
▪ When the man stepped back he trotted, stretching his neck to the ground.
▪ The chickens were walking around loose, stretching out their necks, pulling them back.
▪ Habit of appearing to stand on tiptoe, stretching the neck.
▪ Some held their chins high, stretching necks, their expressions agonized, like martyrs in paintings.
▪ As it is, I've stretched my neck out by ordering a full alert in the West Country.
tie
▪ I took the self-belt off the tunic and tied it around my neck in an exotic knot.
▪ It seemed to be tied to his neck.
▪ It was supplied in plastic bags, carefully wrapped up and tied at the neck with string.
▪ The noose was tied around his neck and strung over the beam.
▪ One end of a string was tied around the neck of each mouse and the other end to the truck.
▪ A red silk scarf was tied around the bloated neck.
▪ Or how about the model with four pastel fuzzy sweaters tied around neck, torso and waist?
wear
▪ When big round collars came in these were worn outside the neck.
▪ She attached a cord and started wearing them around her neck.
▪ Some of them had plaited scraps of cloth in their long black hair and all wore beads around their necks.
▪ You know the pendant she always wears round her neck, shaped like a heart?
▪ He wore round his neck a scrimshaw on a silver chain.
▪ He was wearing an open neck designer type long sleeve shirt and dark trousers.
▪ The Fellowship wore medallions around their necks.
▪ I have never worn Chunni over my head so I just wore it round my neck.
wring
▪ No wonder he looked as if he wanted to wring her neck.
▪ Alma was strong enough to continue wringing the live necks herself.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
I'll wring sb's neck
▪ When Dean gets home, I'm going to wring his neck.
a millstone round/around sb's neck
▪ This particular heritage may be a millstone around the neck of scientific natural history.
an albatross (around your neck)
▪ The project became a financial albatross for the city.
▪ But what began as an enlightened innovation has become an albatross around the neck of the free enterprise system.
▪ Their wingspan exceeds that of an albatross.
be a pain (in the neck)
▪ Carla can be a pain sometimes, but she's been a good friend to me.
▪ Everyone thinks he's a pain in the neck.
▪ It's such a pain to have to drive downtown.
▪ Little brothers are such a pain in the neck!
▪ I hate the IVs, they hurt and are a pain.
▪ I imagined myself traveling the world, giving succor wherever there was pain and suffering.
▪ Instead all she could feel was pain.
▪ Just the starting it is a pain and the tipping it to get it started is a pain.
▪ She felt her strength returning, but there was pain in her eyes, chest and throat.
▪ When I entered it, I was pained with the cold.
be breathing down sb's neck
▪ I'm already really busy today, and now Paul's breathing down my neck saying he wants the Paris deal completed.
▪ I can't work with you breathing down my neck.
▪ We'd better start sending out those letters soon -- I've had the sales manager breathing down my neck about it all week.
▪ He would be breathing down your neck all the time.
▪ Labour and the Liberal Democrats are breathing down his neck.
▪ Maybe the Assistant Commissioner's wife was breathing down Maxham's neck.
▪ The staff is breathing down your neck.
by the scruff of the neck
▪ It just caught me by the scruff of the neck and practically hammered my guts out.
▪ One had hold of the other by the scruff of the neck and had fetched blood.
▪ Three were dragged back on to the train and taken by the scruff of the neck from station to police car.
▪ Your eyes narrow against the claws gripping you by the scruff of the neck until you let your hook of anger go.
put your head/neck on the block
rick your back/neck
save sb's skin/neck/bacon
stick your neck out
▪ Look, I'll stick my neck out and say it'll be finished by tomorrow evening.
▪ The evidence is good, but I won't stick my neck out until all the data is in.
▪ And many economists are reluctant to stick their necks out.
▪ He'd stuck his neck out all right, but not as much as he'd led Holman to believe.
▪ I want to stick my neck out and help her.
▪ It was a place for people who wanted to stick their necks out.
▪ Let Bixby stick his neck out for once, he thought as he stared wearily at his folded hands.
▪ She listened to his ideas, had even stuck her neck out to champion some of his more radical plans.
▪ So I have decided to stick my neck out and to make some predictions for the next 30 years.
▪ You don't have to stick your neck out in meetings.
wring sth's neck
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Bud wrapped a scarf around his neck.
▪ My neck is so sore.
▪ The neck's too low on this shirt.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Butcher Tom picked her up, and I could see that her neck was broken.
▪ Fairly large, long-necked, long-legged wading birds, habitually flying with neck outstretched: a useful distinction from herons.
▪ Fifi and Carmencita watched while Mundin unwrapped the snake from around his neck and poked one end at his little sister.
▪ If the resultant hollow in the neck is really severe it might require a form of heat treatment to rectify the situation.
▪ The neck is made from maple, which was a surprise, because I was expecting mahogany.
▪ Then you start fanning your tail feathers and puffing your neck in and out.
▪ We chat about the lumbering, and the latest antics at Mount Blue, in my neck of the woods.
II.verb
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a millstone round/around sb's neck
▪ This particular heritage may be a millstone around the neck of scientific natural history.
an albatross (around your neck)
▪ The project became a financial albatross for the city.
▪ But what began as an enlightened innovation has become an albatross around the neck of the free enterprise system.
▪ Their wingspan exceeds that of an albatross.
be a pain (in the neck)
▪ Carla can be a pain sometimes, but she's been a good friend to me.
▪ Everyone thinks he's a pain in the neck.
▪ It's such a pain to have to drive downtown.
▪ Little brothers are such a pain in the neck!
▪ I hate the IVs, they hurt and are a pain.
▪ I imagined myself traveling the world, giving succor wherever there was pain and suffering.
▪ Instead all she could feel was pain.
▪ Just the starting it is a pain and the tipping it to get it started is a pain.
▪ She felt her strength returning, but there was pain in her eyes, chest and throat.
▪ When I entered it, I was pained with the cold.
by the scruff of the neck
▪ It just caught me by the scruff of the neck and practically hammered my guts out.
▪ One had hold of the other by the scruff of the neck and had fetched blood.
▪ Three were dragged back on to the train and taken by the scruff of the neck from station to police car.
▪ Your eyes narrow against the claws gripping you by the scruff of the neck until you let your hook of anger go.
put your head/neck on the block
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Jemma found her friends necking in the back of the car.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ He reverted to the stage of church camp necking.
▪ On these drives, they usually end up parking somewhere, only to neck and stuff, according to Fifi.
▪ Samantha starts necking Bob, and then starts necking me.
▪ The two kids stayed by the doors, necking.
▪ They went out in the backyard and necked with us.
▪ We started necking on the sofa, and she undressed, and suggested the bedroom.
Wikipedia

Neck

The neck is the part of the body, on many terrestrial or secondarily aquatic vertebrates, that distinguishes the head from the torso or trunk. In anatomy, the neck is also called by its Latin names, cervix or collum, although when used alone, in context, the word cervix more often refers to the uterine cervix, the neck of the uterus. Thus the adjective cervical may refer either to the neck (as in cervical vertebrae or cervical lymph nodes) or to the uterine cervix (as in cervical cap or cervical cancer).

Neck (water spirit)

The neck, nicor, nixie or nokken (; , nekker; ; ; ; ) are shapeshifting water spirits in Germanic mythology and folklore who usually appeared in forms of other creatures.

Under a variety of names, they were common to the stories of all Germanic peoples, although they are perhaps best known from Scandinavian folklore. The related English knucker was generally depicted as a wyrm or dragon, although more recent versions depict the spirits in other forms. Their sex, bynames, and various transformations vary geographically. The German Nix and his Scandinavian counterparts were males. The German Nixe was a female river mermaid.

Neck (disambiguation)

The neck is the body part between the head and torso of many animals.

Neck may also refer to:

Neck (short story)

"Neck" is a short story by Roald Dahl. It first appeared in the 1953 collection Someone Like You.

Neck (film)

is a 2010 Japanese horror- comedy film starring Junpei Mizobata and Saki Aibu. It was directed by Takeshi Shirakawa.

Neck (music)

The neck is the part of certain string instruments that projects from the main body and is the base of the fingerboard, where the fingers are placed to stop the strings at different pitches. Guitars, banjos, ukuleles, lutes, the violin family, and the mandolin family are examples of instruments which have necks. Necks are also an integral part of certain woodwind instruments, like for instance the saxophone.

The word for neck also sometimes appears in other languages in musical instructions. The terms include manche (French), manico (Italian), and Hals (German).

Neck (Chinese constellation)

The Neck mansion (亢宿, pinyin: Kàng Xiù) is one of the Twenty-eight mansions of the Chinese constellations. It is one of the eastern mansions of the Azure Dragon.

In Chinese Cosmology, the Kang Constellation is associated with the Kidney Organ. 亢 is a picture of a person standing with their legs open, as in horse stance, and so holds the quality of strength that comes through a proper foundation. This matches up with Chapter 8 of the Suwen, which says that the Kidney is in charge of strength and fortification. The Kidney houses the Zhi, which is in charge of solid grounding in one’s life purpose. Kang is also the neck or throat of the Azure Dragon of the East, which, while the throat area is ruled by the Lung, has everything to do with sound—pointing to the Kidney’s orifice of the ears. Around the 5th Century BC, it is believed that eclipses would take place in this constellation. This coming together of the Sun and the moon works as a symbol that points towards the ShaoYin relationship of the Kidney and Heart.

Neck (band)

Neck is a six-piece London- Irish Celtic punk band from the North London neighbourhood of 'County Holloway' (known informally thus due to its Irish population). Following Leeson O'Keeffe's cathartic 'Tour of Duty' as a former member of Shane MacGowan and the Popes, Neck were formed during late-night drinking sessions (known colloquially as being 'born in a bottle') in 1994 by a mixture of Irish emigrant and second-generation Irish drinking buddies. The band takes their lead, both musically and ideologically, from two other London bands: The Clash and The Pogues, blending the electric energy of punk rock with the swirl of traditional Irish music, to play a London-Irish style known as 'Psycho-Ceilídh'.

Initially playing exclusively on the London Irish bar circuit, apparently mainly for more hedonistic reasons, and with a correspondingly 'cavalier' attitude towards required band possessions, their name was serendipitously gleaned from the reaction to their approach by the exasperated landlord at their first ever gig, cursing them with an old Irish saying using the term "neck" – implying high levels of nerve or impudence.

They appear to have branched-out considerably, both aspirationally and geographically, since then: touring extensively throughout the United States, Europe, UK and Ireland; gaining a reputation as a raucous, high-energy live act, leading to them becoming an established festival band. Such festivals include: Tantsy festival in Moscow Hermitage Garden; Dublin Irish Festival, Ohio – the second-largest Irish festival in the United States; Paas Pop in The Netherlands; The West Belfast Féile an Phobail; Berlin's Punk & Disorderly festival four times; the UK's largest festival, Glastonbury festival, six times; and the UK's Wasted/Rebellion Punk festival ten times.

Their music is known for having an uplifting quality, and it reflects the life experience of the emigrant and second-generation Irish diaspora, with O'Keeffe's authentic voice and song-and-tune-writing being considered both faithful to the form, and in direct lineage from his former band-leader and mentor, Shane MacGowan. Combined with deft musicianship, Neck have released four albums to date, with their third album, 'Sod 'em & begorrah!' being picked out for particularly high praise by being judged, variously, the second and third greatest Celtic punk album of all time, the former above, and the latter behind only The Pogues and Flogging Molly. They've also appeared on numerous compilation albums, and their natural London inclusiveness and punk sensibilities came well to the fore on their Joe Strummer (of The Clash) -inspired anti-racism anthem "Everybody's Welcome to The Hooley!", which charted in the UK Singles Chart and UK Indie Chart in 2006.

Their music can also be heard on various motion picture soundtracks: on the "surreal" Pirates of the White Sand short (2005); The Emerald Diamond, a 2006 documentary film about the Irish National Baseball Team - contributing four songs, including the traditional " Star of the County Down" and the original "Every Day's Saint Patrick's Day"; the Boston-set Gang War Shoot-'em Up Beantown (2007); and the "Capraesque" homage to 'Small Town America Coming of Age' Supermarket (2009). They also appear performing two songs, the traditional " Carrickfergus" and the original "The Ferry Fare", in the 1999, Belfast-set, Film 4 Romantic Comedy Drama With or Without You, directed by Michael Winterbottom ( Family / Welcome to Sarajevo / 24 Hour Party People).

With over half their members drawn from the renowned London Irish traditional music session scene, their authentic, spirited musicianship has earned them much respect and admiration. Staying true to those roots, they often perform acoustic ' Unplugged / Irish traditional music session' sets, even alongside full electric ones, and such is their flair, energy and passion - exemplified by O'Keeffe's 'wearing his heart on his sleeve', that they were awarded the honour by the Irish Cultural Centre in London to perform such a Seisiún at the Reception for the Irish Paralympic team in London 2012, in order to set the right Irish tone and ambience to the proceedings.

This reputation has led to various members being invited to appear both live and on other band's recordings. The most well known is O'Keeffe guesting, on banjo, with the Alabama 3, as well as co-writing an original song "That's It, I Quit" on the Hayseed Dixie album No Covers.

This has all led to them being recognised widely as one of the leading bands on the international Celtic punk and folk punk scenes, alongside their US contemporaries Dropkick Murphys and Flogging Molly, and such is their influence that not only is the Boston, Massachusetts-based website covering the Celtic punk scene, Shite 'n' Onions, named after one of their tunes, but bands as far flung as in Germany and the United States now cover their songs, while O'Keeffe gets name-checked in songs by other bands.

Wiktionary

neck

n. 1 The part of body connecting the head and the trunk found in humans and some animals. 2 The corresponding part in some other anatomical contexts. 3 The part of a shirt, dress etc., which fits a person's '''neck'''. 4 The tapered part of a bottle toward the opening. 5 (context botany English) The slender tubelike extension atop an archegonium, through which the sperm swim to reach the egg. 6 (context music English) The extension of any stringed instrument on which a fingerboard is mounted 7 A long narrow tract of land projecting from the main body, or a narrow tract connecting two larger tracts. 8 (context engineering English) A reduction in size near the end of an object, formed by a groove around it. 9 The constriction between the root and crown of a tooth. 10 (context architecture English) The gorgerin of a capital. 11 (context firearms English) The small part of a gun between the chase and the swell of the muzzle. vb. 1 To hang by the neck; strangle; kill, eliminate 2 (context US English) To make love; to snog; to intently kiss or cuddle. 3 To drink rapidly. 4 To decrease in diameter.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

neck

Old English hnecca "neck, nape, back of the neck" (a fairly rare word) from Proto-Germanic *hnekk- "the nape of the neck" (cognates: Old Frisian hnekka, Middle Dutch necke, Dutch nek, Old Norse hnakkr, Old High German hnach, German Nacken "neck"), with no certain cognates outside Germanic, though Klein's sources suggest PIE *knok- "high point, ridge" (source of Old Irish cnocc, Welsh cnwch, Old Breton cnoch "hill").\n

\nThe more usual Old English words were hals (the general Germanic word, cognate with Gothic, Old Norse, Danish, Swedish, Dutch, German hals), cognate with Latin collum (see collar (n.)); and sweora, swira "neck, nape," probably also from a PIE root meaning "column" (cognate with Old English swer "column," Sanskrit svaru- "post").\n

\nTransferred senses attested from c.1400. Phrase neck of the woods (American English) is attested from 1780 in the sense of "narrow stretch of woods;" 1839 with meaning "settlement in a wooded region." To stick one's neck out "take a risk" is first recorded 1919, American English. Horses running neck and neck is attested from 1799.

neck

"to kiss, embrace, caress," 1825 (implied in necking) in northern England dialect, from neck (n.). Compare Middle English halsen "to embrace or caress affectionately, to fondle sexually," from hals (n.) "neck." Earlier, neck as a verb meant "to kill by a strike on the neck" (mid-15c.). Related: Necked.

WordNet

neck

v. kiss, embrace, or fondle with sexual passion; "The couple were necking in the back seat of the car" [syn: make out]

neck

  1. n. the part of an organism that connects the head to the rest of the body; "he admired her long graceful neck" [syn: cervix]

  2. a narrow elongated projecting strip of land

  3. a cut of meat from the neck of an animal

  4. opening for the neck; the part of a garment near the neck opening

The Collaborative International Dictionary

neck

neck \neck\, v. i. To kiss and caress amorously. [Colloq.] -- n. necking.

Gazetteer

Usage examples of "neck".

He urged her back against the closed door and kissed her neck, the bristle from his shaven jaw abrading her and making her skin tingle.

A small area of abrasion or contusion was on the cheek near the right ear, and a prominent dried abrasion was on the lower left side of the neck.

Dragged by the scruff of the neck, Leif stared at the carnage wide-eyed as Acies whistled and shouted something in a strange tongue.

The clavicle was fractured two inches from the acromial end, and the sternal end was driven high up into the muscles of the neck.

The most they can manage is a sort of diagonal slouch: feet on the floor, necks bent up against the bulkhead, Acton cradling her like a living hammock.

Baptiste had Adeem pinned against the floor, straddling him as he wrapped his hands around his neck.

Club-feet, wry neck, spinal curvature, hip-joint disease, white swellings, and stiffened joints, are all readily amendable to the curative effects of motion administered by the manipulator and other machinery.

She lifted the device to her neck, but she paused before administering it.

Lord Ado looked shriveled, a large bruise on the side of his face, his neck raw and abraded.

Felicia took note of the fashionably low neckline, and her hand crept up to ringer the delicate aerophane crepe that fashioned the upper portion of her bodice, then formed a ruff at her neck.

They gasped at the sight of the afanc, thrashing furiously now in the lake with its great neck bending to and fro.

It was sleeveless, with a scooped neck and a softly full torso that would cling around the bust and then float out in an ageless style that fell to the floor.

He fastened the embroidered peacock agraffe at her neck and pulled the hood up over her plaited hair.

He unclasped the silver agraffe at his neck and swung the cloak from his shoulders.

Juss, enforcing his half frozen limbs to resume the ascent, beheld a sight of woe too terrible for the eye: a young man, helmed and graithed in dark iron, a black-a-moor with goggle-eyes and white teeth agrin, who held by the neck a fair young lady kneeling on her knees and clasping his as in supplication, and he most bloodily brandishing aloft his spear of six foot of length as minded to reave her of her life.