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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

near

I.adverb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
almost/nearly/near perfect
▪ His collection included an almost perfect skeleton of an armadillo.
▪ Her performance was near perfect.
damn near (=almost)
▪ He damn near drowned.
Near East
▪ Ancient Near Eastern literature
near extinction (=being almost becoming extinct)
▪ Wolves have returned to the forest, almost ten years after near extinction.
near/approach a climax
▪ One of the most important trials in recent history is nearing its climax today.
nearest approximation
▪ It was the nearest approximation to a crisis she’d ever experienced.
nearing completion (=almost finished)
▪ The house is nearing completion .
not nearly/nowhere near enoughinformal (= much less than you need)
▪ We only had $500, and that was nowhere near enough to buy a new camcorder.
nowhere near as...as
▪ She’s nowhere near as pretty as you are.
nowhere near ready/full/finished etc
▪ The building’s nowhere near finished.
sb's nearest/closest rival (=the one that is closest to beating them)
▪ She finished 7.1 seconds ahead of her nearest rival.
the near future (=soon)
▪ A new product launch is planned for the near future.
the nearest available sth
▪ Ruth sat down in the nearest available armchair.
the nearest exit
▪ Please leave the building in an orderly fashion, using the nearest exit.
the nearest/closest equivalent
▪ The corner store was the closest equivalent we had to a supermarket when I was young.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
full
▪ Our team will be as near full strength as possible, although once again injuries are beginning to dog us.
future
▪ Subscriptions Will all members with unpaid subscriptions please forward a remittance in the very near future.
▪ She'd be surprised if it wasn't applied to her rump in the very near future.
▪ Besides the present releases, at least three others are planned for the fairly near future.
▪ In Cowley's opinion, the arrogant little man should be invited to leave the country in the very near future indeed.
▪ It was hoped that there might be one or more lawyers in post in the relatively near future.
▪ The trade of elephant catching and training is likely to die out in the very near future.
▪ There could also be an own brand product in the very near future.
▪ Reading the scriptures, they translate this into the very near future.
impossible
▪ It's been near impossible for anymole to see him since November, when he went into retreat.
▪ And these are in no way direct comparisons - that's near impossible.
perfect
▪ In the latter case the specimen is of near perfect geometry for a torsion test.
▪ Conclusions: The velvet cloth is a near perfect black, but more expensive and less readily available than the other materials.
▪ Unfortunately, strong winds curtailed the sport on a near perfect river level carrying about four inches extra, but fining off.
▪ In the main, larval control would have to be near perfect in its efficiency and to allow very few adults to survive.
▪ In this chapter, I look at what would happen if the acoustic-phonetic front-end did achieve near perfect performance.
■ VERB
come
▪ And for years and years they never came near.
▪ For a time young Jarratt lived in a rural county, where no minister came near.
▪ Gathered, all of them, boys and girls aged eight to twelve, at the play-yard railings when he came near.
▪ She never once attacked others who came near.
▪ They must know by now whether a relief force was coming near.
▪ With all that booze I came near to passing out.
▪ And just then the noble knight came near, on his black horse.
▪ When the boat bringing us over came near to land, I fell to my knees.
damn
▪ My dybbuk set out to drive me crazy, and she damned near did.
▪ Why, Seikaly was damned near fully operational.
draw
▪ As we drew near and I watched 747 after 747 climbing laboriously into the clouds, I wondered what fate befell me.
▪ As lunch-time drew near I decided to let the children listen to the music while they were having their meal.
▪ As closing time drew near, the children grew less.
▪ As the pair drew near he turned and fled.
▪ The roar of the crackling fire drew near and doom seemed inevitable.
▪ Men prosper for a decade, and demons dare not draw near!
▪ Macbean's move comes as the deadline for the second of the quarterly awards draws near.
▪ The bailiff directed all to draw near and give their attendance, promising that they would be heard.
get
▪ He stood up as she got near, taking off his sunglasses politely, and they shook hands.
▪ I guess when you get near forty you kind of change.
▪ We could see them, but we couldn't get near because there was no wind.
▪ In fact, it was sometimes so crowded that customers could not get near!
▪ They played well when you got near enough to hear.
▪ And how are we to get near?
▪ This is the thanks we get near civil war in the boardroom.
▪ Eventually the vessel got near enough for us to see that it was a passenger steamer.
live
▪ Families living near by were warned to stay indoors because of toxic smoke.
▪ There is a torn up house I live near and the stairs are broken down.
▪ Only those people who live near by are allowed to open accounts.
▪ The next day he and another Bengali boy who lives near by chose another way home, hoping to escape the attackers.
▪ Larger numbers of roe deer live near there and Czechoslovakia still has bears and wolves roaming in the wild.
▪ Let us live near together and be kind to each other and love each other.
▪ Her children all live near, and the house is still full with visiting grandchildren.
miss
▪ He had had numerous prangs and near misses in his motoring life and not one of them had been his fault.
▪ Anything short of a very near miss merely blew them away.
▪ Discuss the reasons for incidents and near misses with your colleagues, so that the lessons can be learned. 7.
▪ The first questionnaire was about their driving experience including the questions about accidents and near misses that were reported in Study 1.
▪ Warlow's claim that the Earth has flipped five times over 13,000 years implies a cosmic near miss every 2600 years.
▪ Several other motorists had near misses.
▪ You only get points for winning, not dominating and near misses!
▪ Like other convergences, it includes at least as many collisions and near misses as genuine meeting points.
stand
▪ A guard with a huge Alsatian stood near by.
▪ Miss Sumida stands near, almost touching me, for most of the conversation.
▪ He felt worse because a policeman, who was standing near, laughed and walked away.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
Nearer my God to Thee
be at/near etc the end of your rope
be located in/near etc sth
▪ At Mallia, a similarly designed suite was located in the north-west corner of the temple.
▪ The bulk of the world's rainforests, 97 percent, are located in 27 developing countries.
▪ The four metropolitan areas with the highest rents were located in California: San Jose, $ 1, 330.
▪ The three theaters are located in the center of town.
▪ When you get an office, you will be located in a business world.
▪ While the industrial sector remained small in real terms, much industrial production continued to be located in rural areas.
draw near/closer
▪ As the habeas hearing drew near, Lancaster County officials' concern over these revelations grew noticeable.
▪ As the pair drew near he turned and fled.
▪ As the race drew closer it was time for Paul to take a back seat.
▪ As we drew near and I watched 747 after 747 climbing laboriously into the clouds, I wondered what fate befell me.
▪ Men prosper for a decade, and demons dare not draw near!
▪ The bailiff directed all to draw near and give their attendance, promising that they would be heard.
▪ They drew near the bed and stared down at the boy who lay there sleeping in its drifts of tumbling lace.
▪ Two young boys, of around ten years of age, drawing closer, then parallel, now swiftly passing, past.
near enough
▪ At noon they saw it; then they were near enough to hear it.
▪ Filmer had been sitting with his back to me, it was true, but near enough to overhear.
▪ He is near enough to hear them calling, the words bounced and steered and elongated by the contours of the land.
▪ Jones and Brewer have had a long series of injuries, but both are near enough to fitness and form.
▪ No one was near enough to accost her or wonder about her presence.
▪ The Trojans were almost near enough to set the ships on fire.
▪ When he saw me, he leaned on his shovel until I was near enough to shake hands.
near the knuckle
not anything like/near
not anywhere near
nowhere near
▪ After eight hours climbing, we were still nowhere near the top of the mountain.
▪ The car was parked in the middle of the street, nowhere near the curb.
the Near East
too close/near for comfort
▪ At times, the similarities are too close for comfort, edging towards the derivative.
▪ But our last memory was of a nightingale pair, singing in competition in territories perhaps too close for comfort.
▪ Cross-addictions may be hotly denied because the subject matter may for some be too close for comfort.
▪ In a wave trough I caught a glimpse of a coral head to port: a little too close for comfort.
▪ Lightning dipped and veered in a manner which was far too close for comfort.
▪ Richard, and you quite see why, finds economy airline seats too close for comfort.
▪ The movement brought him too close for comfort.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Add the cream near the end of the cooking time.
▪ Asha's office is near the vending machines.
▪ Sasha grew up on a farm near Ithaca, New York.
II.adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
much
▪ But he's much nearer than he was.
▪ On 23 April the bombing came much nearer.
▪ This could explain why we see some quasars much nearer than we would normally expect to see them.
▪ Possibly, but the site of Clairvaux suggests an explanation much nearer at hand.
▪ Yet state censorship has arguably come much nearer and become more sinister with the Spycatcher affair and the more recent Section 28.
▪ If you'd wanted to go to church you could have gone to St Ermin's which is much nearer.
▪ The answer was much nearer home.
▪ The sounds came from the left this time and were much nearer.
■ NOUN
completion
▪ The purchaser should identify the need for an independent valuation as early as possible to avoid subsequent delay nearer completion.
▪ This is despite the near completion of a £70,000 five year project set up to save the paths.
disaster
▪ It took a couple of near disasters to set me straight.
▪ Once again, he had walked away from near disaster.
end
▪ Breakfast was laid on the floor at the near end of the room.
▪ He had his private spot at the near end, where the bar curves into the wall.
future
▪ Unfortunately we have no vacancies at present nor do I anticipate any in the near future.
▪ Rookie Andrew DeClercq might see something besides garbage-time minutes in the near future.
▪ Fears about the threat of more deportations in the near future are believed to be behind the resistance to the police action.
▪ He had the eerie, crystal-ball feeling that there would be another, newer, sadder sentence in the very near future.
▪ Forget oil and land, water is where the most intractable disputes will arise in the near future.
▪ Hope to see you one day in the near future.
▪ Many of the new jobs being created now or in the near future are transient.
▪ Thus, throughout these chapters there is an ominous foreboding of death to come in the near future.
hospital
▪ The nearest hospital is on the main island, and the boat comes only once or twice a day.
▪ People who need cataract surgery are taken by bus to the nearest hospital for surgery, and returned home the next day.
▪ On occasion we took them to the nearest hospital, but beds were not always available.
▪ He promptly turned off the by-pass and headed for the nearest hospital.
▪ She was rushed to the nearest hospital.
▪ Dawn was taken immediately to the nearest hospital and put on a life-support machine in the Intensive Care Unit.
▪ We were in the heart of the rainforest, a day's travel from the nearest hospital.
miss
▪ Owen had, however, the sense of relief that follows a near miss.
▪ None the less, we do have records of many near misses from relatively modern sources.
▪ I was below, completely unaware of this near miss.
▪ The little girl who had had the near miss with the blackboard was the daughter of a minister.
▪ The near miss is exciting; even shocking.
▪ Rarer are stories of near misses of Earth by cosmic projectiles.
neighbour
▪ A fellow farmer and near neighbour in Duns, Ian was an enthusiastic amateur racing driver.
▪ A near neighbour was recruited as a support worker and she too began to become involved in the family arguments.
▪ The library of course was gutted, but Walker Books, a near neighbour of the school, is coming to the rescue.
▪ The nearest neighbour, a farmer well into his seventies, was more than five miles and a range of low hills away.
▪ Charlton Heston lived on the other side and Warren Beatty was also a near neighbour.
▪ Does your nearest neighbour have a higher profile in the area?
neighbours
▪ In those days, it was a community and most people knew their near neighbours well.
▪ She was here alone with him, miles from the nearest neighbours.
▪ The result was a network of 50,000 cortical points, each connected to its nearest neighbours by a line.
▪ But the church's plans are not popular with the vicarage's nearest neighbours.
post
▪ Silvinho swung the ball in at pace to the near post, where Chris Armstrong glanced it into his own net.
▪ Norbury crossed with an overhead kick and Dublin stabbed a close-range shot inside the near post.
▪ The ball rolls slowly inside the near post.
▪ Paul Bosvelt's cross to the near post appeared to be converted by Kluivert and was credited as such by the referee.
▪ Palace spurned numerous chances before Coleman headed in Southgate's cross at the near post after 56 minutes.
▪ Molby swung in the free-kick and Saunders met it perfectly with his head on the near post to score a spectacular goal.
▪ Ripley beat Paul Parker on the left, cut inside and hit a low cross to the near post.
relative
▪ Specially trained staff interviewed the parents or the nearest relative of any study child who died.
▪ Also, as Sheila Silcock's article highlights, the nearest relative may be unaware of their rights under the Act.
▪ The three woodpeckers are different from their nearest relatives in Java and Borneo.
▪ Outside the compound of the bride's parents the processions were met by similar processional parties of near relatives of the bride.
▪ Anything above this is divided between your spouse and parents or nearest relatives, like a brother.
rival
▪ In January, polls showed Dole was leading his nearest rival by 23 percentage points.
▪ Their hosts are Halstead's nearest rivals for survival.
▪ With their nearest rival, Tesco, they've become far and away the most popular places to do the weekly shop.
side
▪ In total the maria cover some 16 % of the Moon's surface-mostly on the near side.
▪ The near side of the Moon was thoroughly photographed and measured.
▪ As the piston is pushed the near side opens and the air pressure closes the back flap.
▪ Most of the near side of the Moon is bright, rough, high terrain, called the lunar highlands.
▪ Cross to tarmac track on the far side of toilet block ahead, ignoring track on near side.
▪ The near side will also appear to be thicker than the far side.
term
▪ In the near term, it does not intend to pay any dividends, instead ploughing all profits back.
▪ To be competitive, Prodigy is working to achieve feature parity with other on-line services in the near term.
▪ The solution has been to concentrate a lot of the debt relief in the near term.
▪ In the near term, the outlook is mixed.
thing
▪ A little bit of sleep was the nearest thing to consolation left for people like us.
▪ So let us accept that I am the nearest thing to a father that Nana has available.
▪ The Algonquin is the nearest thing I have to a home away from home.
▪ A fast ride on a racing bicycle is the nearest thing in this world to man-powered flight.
▪ Here was perhaps the nearest thing to alchemy that had ever been seen in the field of politics.
▪ Still, as Jane belonged nowhere, Sussex became the nearest thing to home.
town
▪ It all seemed a thousand miles from the nearest town, though in actuality it might be only five or six.
▪ We picked up the bodies of the two cops and took them to the nearest town.
▪ He went into the nearest town and bought a proper shovel.
▪ I had driven to Gondal, the nearest town, to make phone calls and have a wash.
▪ From Calais to Albert, the nearest town to Thiepval, is but a two hour drive.
▪ I offered to take them into the nearest town for tea.
▪ Yet another amazing coincidence, to meet in such a small place more than 100 miles from the nearest town!
▪ Internal flight to Poprad, the nearest town, then transport to point of access into the mountains.
village
▪ It stood some way from the nearest village on the road from Brünn to Olmütz.
▪ The nearest village to Stenay is Baaion.
▪ Christopher's potter friend lived in a farmhouse and the nearest village was called Bourg de Visa.
▪ The nearest village was about five miles away.
▪ We met one nomad driving 40 head of cattle in the baking sun, hours from the nearest village.
▪ He then grabbed the reins and drove back along the road, leaving the wounded post-boy to stagger to the nearest village.
▪ Then they set off over the fields for the nearest village, two miles away.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Martha has to drive 20 miles to the nearest doctor.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Also, as Sheila Silcock's article highlights, the nearest relative may be unaware of their rights under the Act.
▪ And those are just a few with Hall of Fame or near Hall of Fame credentials.
▪ At least things are moving now on 2807 and we may have more news in the near future.
▪ Other men in the car were watching them too, and the near ones were listening.
▪ She'd reach for the nearest man, and pull.
▪ The nearest lakes are Derwentwater and the larger Ullswater where you can take a cruise.
▪ You know how far it was from our farm to the nearest golf course?
III.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
live
▪ So, too, do those people in towns who have the misfortune to live near the wrong warehouse.
▪ For example, even those who did live near their kin did not see them especially often.
▪ Airports attract hotels and businesses; they employ large numbers of well-paid staff who like to live near their work.
▪ Such risk assessment is sometimes complicated by the pressure from relatives who do not live near.
▪ Parents and children will live near to other relatives or even share a house with them.
now
▪ The alliance is now nearing a series of big decisions.
▪ The rolling infantry battle was now nearing the edge of the plateau.
▪ The number of known NEAs of all sizes is now nearing four hundred.
■ NOUN
end
▪ It is more likely that it was an old, sick or diseased specimen that was nearing the end of its life.
▪ One such plan was widely discussed as the decade neared its end.
▪ Redundancies have by no means been restricted to those nearing the end of their careers or whose job performance has been subject to criticism.
▪ Is he nearing the end of his career?
▪ A railcoach from Bispham nearing the end of its journey to the Airport at Squires Gate in 1960. 3.
▪ That work is nearing an end now.
▪ Sir Galahad nearing the end of his quest.
▪ Hubbell is nearing the end of a 21-month federal sentence.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
Nearer my God to Thee
be at/near etc the end of your rope
near enough
▪ At noon they saw it; then they were near enough to hear it.
▪ Filmer had been sitting with his back to me, it was true, but near enough to overhear.
▪ He is near enough to hear them calling, the words bounced and steered and elongated by the contours of the land.
▪ Jones and Brewer have had a long series of injuries, but both are near enough to fitness and form.
▪ No one was near enough to accost her or wonder about her presence.
▪ The Trojans were almost near enough to set the ships on fire.
▪ When he saw me, he leaned on his shovel until I was near enough to shake hands.
near the knuckle
not anything like/near
not anywhere near
nowhere near
▪ After eight hours climbing, we were still nowhere near the top of the mountain.
▪ The car was parked in the middle of the street, nowhere near the curb.
the Near East
too close/near for comfort
▪ At times, the similarities are too close for comfort, edging towards the derivative.
▪ But our last memory was of a nightingale pair, singing in competition in territories perhaps too close for comfort.
▪ Cross-addictions may be hotly denied because the subject matter may for some be too close for comfort.
▪ In a wave trough I caught a glimpse of a coral head to port: a little too close for comfort.
▪ Lightning dipped and veered in a manner which was far too close for comfort.
▪ Richard, and you quite see why, finds economy airline seats too close for comfort.
▪ The movement brought him too close for comfort.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ As she neared her home she could see a light in the window.
▪ As the deadline neared, both sides agreed to continue talking.
▪ Nevins is nearing 40 but still looks boyish.
▪ Work is nearing completion.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Or it may be that the race is in fact tightening up as the Nov. 5 Election Day nears.
▪ She neared the exit with relief.
▪ The Worth Valley Railway's standard class four 2-6-4T 80002 nears completion.
▪ Then, as we neared home again, I noticed Iobates' bodyguard hiding in ambush.
▪ When the temperature nears 100, pets can get overheated even when riding in air-conditioned cars.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Near

Near \Near\, prep. Adjacent to; close by; not far from; nigh; as, the ship sailed near the land. See the Note under near, a.

Near

Near \Near\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Neared; p. pr. & vb. n Nearing.] [See Near, adv.] To approach; to come nearer; as, the ship neared the land.

Near

Near \Near\, v. i. To draw near; to approach.

A speck, a mist, a shape, I wist! And still it neared, and neared.
--Coleridge.

Near

Near \Near\, a. [Compar. Nearer; superl. Nearest.] [See Near, adv.]

  1. Not far distant in time, place, or degree; not remote; close at hand; adjacent; neighboring; nigh. ``As one near death.''
    --Shak.

    He served great Hector, and was ever near, Not with his trumpet only, but his spear.
    --Dryden.

  2. Closely connected or related.

    She is thy father's near kinswoman.
    --Lev. xviii. 12.

  3. Close to one's interests, affection, etc.; touching, or affecting intimately; intimate; dear; as, a near friend.

  4. Close to anything followed or imitated; not free, loose, or rambling; as, a version near to the original.

  5. So as barely to avoid or pass injury or loss; close; narrow[3]; as, a near escape; a near miss.

  6. Next to the driver, when he is on foot; in the Unted States, on the left of an animal or a team; as, the near ox; the near leg. See Off side, under Off, a.

  7. Immediate; direct; close; short. ``The nearest way.''
    --Milton.

  8. Close-fisted; parsimonious. [Obs. or Low, Eng.]

    Note: Near may properly be followed by to before the thing approached; but more frequently to is omitted, and the adjective or the adverb is regarded as a preposition. The same is also true of the word nigh.

    Syn: Nigh; close; adjacent; proximate; contiguous; present; ready; intimate; familiar; dear.

Near

Near \Near\ (n[=e]r), adv. [AS. ne['a]r, compar. of ne['a]h nigh. See Nigh.]

  1. At a little distance, in place, time, manner, or degree; not remote; nigh.

    My wife! my traitress! let her not come near me.
    --Milton.

  2. Nearly; almost; well-nigh. ``Near twenty years ago.''
    --Shak. ``Near a fortnight ago.''
    --Addison.

    Near about the yearly value of the land.
    --Locke.

  3. Closely; intimately.
    --Shak.

    Far and near, at a distance and close by; throughout a whole region.

    To come near to, to want but little of; to approximate to. ``Such a sum he found would go near to ruin him.''
    --Addison.

    Near the wind (Naut.), close to the wind; closehauled.

WordNet

near

v. move towards; "We were approaching our destination"; "They are drawing near"; "The enemy army came nearer and nearer" [syn: approach, come on, go up, draw near, draw close, come near]

near

  1. adj. not far distant in time or space or degree or circumstances; "near neighbors"; "in the near future"; "they are near equals"; "his nearest approach to success"; "a very near thing"; "a near hit by the bomb"; "she was near tears"; "she was close to tears"; "had a close call" [syn: close] [ant: far]

  2. being on the left side; "the near or nigh horse is the one on the left"; "the animal's left side is its near or nigh side" [syn: near(a), nigh(a)]

  3. closely resembling the genuine article; "near beer"; "a dress of near satin"

  4. giving or spending with reluctance; "our cheeseparing administration"; "very close (or near) with his money"; "a penny-pinching miserly old man" [syn: cheeseparing, close, penny-pinching]

  5. with or in a close or intimate relationship; "a good friend"; "my sisters and brothers are near and dear" [syn: dear, good]

  6. very close in resemblance; "sketched in an approximate likeness"; "a near likeness" [syn: approximate]

near

  1. adv. near in time or place or relationship; "as the wedding day drew near"; "stood near the door"; "don't shoot until they come near"; "getting near to the true explanation"; "her mother is always near"; "The end draws nigh"; "the bullet didn't come close"; "don't get too close to the fire" [syn: nigh, close]

  2. (of actions or states) slightly short of or not quite accomplished; `near' is sometimes used informally for `nearly' and `most' is sometimes used informally for `almost'; "the job is (just) about done"; "the baby was almost asleep when the alarm sounded"; "we're almost finished"; "the car all but ran her down"; "he nearly fainted"; "talked for nigh onto 2 hours"; "the recording is well-nigh perfect"; "virtually all the parties signed the contract"; "I was near exhausted by the run"; "most everyone agrees" [syn: about, just about, almost, most, all but, nearly, nigh, virtually, well-nigh]

Wikipedia

Near

NEAR or Near may refer to:

Near (company)

Near is a privately held location intelligence platform founded in Nov 2012 having direct presence in Australia, Japan, South East Asia, India, Europe, and United States. Near is headquartered in Singapore.

Near (Death Note)

, exclusively known by the mononym , is a fictional character in the manga series Death Note, created by Tsugumi Ohba and Takeshi Obata. Near is the younger of the two successors to L who was investigating the methods of identifying Kira, the name given to the mysterious serial killer who murders criminals by means of the eponymous Death Note. He becomes the leader of the SPK (Special Provision for Kira), an organization that looks into the Kira case, and in the end, succeeds in uncovering Kira's identity as Light Yagami.

In the anime adaptation, Near is voiced by Noriko Hidaka in Japanese and by Cathy Weseluck in the English version. He is portrayed by Narushi Fukuda in L: Change the World and by Mio Yūki in the television drama.

Wiktionary

near

  1. 1 Physically close. 2 Closely connected or related. 3 Close to one's interests, affection, etc.; intimate; dear. 4 Close to anything followed or imitated; not free, loose, or rambling. 5 So as barely to avoid or pass injury or loss; close; narrow. 6 (context of an event English) Approaching. 7 approximate, almost. 8 (context dated English) Next to the driver, when he is on foot; (context US English) on the left of an animal or a team. 9 (context obsolete English) Immediate; direct; close; short. 10 (context obsolete slang English) stingy; parsimonious. adv. 1 Having a small intervening distance with regard to something. 2 (context colloquial English) nearly n. The left side of a horse or of a team of horses pulling a carriage etc. prep. close to, in close proximity to. v

  2. To come closer to; to approach.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

near

Old English near "closer, nearer," comparative of neah, neh"nigh." Influenced by Old Norse naer "near," it came to be used as a positive form mid-13c., and new comparative nearer developed 1500s (see nigh). As an adjective from c.1300. Originally an adverb but now supplanted in most such senses by nearly; it has in turn supplanted correct nigh as an adjective. Related: Nearness. In near and dear (1620s) it refers to nearness of kinship. Near East first attested 1891, in Kipling. Near beer "low-alcoholic brew" is from 1908.

near

"to draw near," 1510s, from near (adv.). Related: Neared; nearing.

Usage examples of "near".

And when I asked him how an abo could possibly have known what copper looked like in the ground, he said the man had been employed at one of the mines near Nullagine.

Ann they had both been aboad a bus cruising at eighteen miles an hour along the sixty-lane freeway that ran from Bear Canyon to Pasadena, near the middle of Los Angeles.

The very sight of the awesome Forest aborigines, with their fanged muzzles agape and their taloned hands hovering near their weapons, was enough to convert the dance-bone cheaters to instant integrity.

The same women that despised Sky Eyes, that gossiped about her and futilely forbade their sons to come near her, they came for abortifacients, joint easers, the silvery drink that brought one out of a dark mood, a dozen other things.

A small area of abrasion or contusion was on the cheek near the right ear, and a prominent dried abrasion was on the lower left side of the neck.

He watched it, then dropped another daisy into the water, and after that another, and sat watching them with bright, absolved eyes, crouching near on the bank.

Tim had always found himself especially attuned to the deserted charms of Candie Gardens in winter, enjoying the bare traceries of the trees and the widened harbour view, the few points of colour against the monochrome background - the red and pink of the camellias near the top gate, the hanging yellow bells of the winter-flowering abutilon with their red clappers, even the iridescence of the mallard drake circling the largest of the ponds with his speckled mate.

Lead truck following Aby, rolling down to the fatal turn, where the woods came near the road.

Banish was standing across the barn, near where the Abies girl had been found.

As we neared the cordon the Academician, Pael, started a gloomy countdown.

As the hour for supper drew near, I excused myself so well that Madame Orio could not insist upon my accepting her invitation to stay.

When I saw Nanette in my arms, beaming with love, and Marton near the bed, holding a candle, with her eyes reproaching us with ingratitude because we did not speak to her, who, by accepting my first caresses, had encouraged her sister to follow her example, I realized all my happiness.

Holding back as they reached a less-frequented street, Harry saw Alban enter the Acme Florists, which was near the middle of the block.

Each great natural family has requisites that define it, and the characters that make it recognizable are the nearest to these fundamental conditions: thus, reproduction being the major function of the plant, the embryo will be its most important part, and it becomes possible to divide the vegetable kingdom into three classes: acotyledons, monocotyledons, and dicotyledons.

Playboys, not running in soccer-sprawled acreage near the old airport.