Find the word definition

Wikipedia

MTR

The Mass Transit Railway (MTR) is the rapid transit railway system in Hong Kong. Opened in 1979, the system now includes of rail with 155 stations, including 87 railway stations and 68 light rail stops. The MTR system is operated by MTR Corporation Limited (MTRCL). It is one of the most profitable systems in the world, with a high farebox recovery ratio of 186%.

Under the government's rail-led transport policy, the MTR system is a common mode of public transport in Hong Kong, with over five million trips made in an average weekday. It consistently achieves a 99.9% on-time rate on its train journeys. As of 2014, the MTR has a 48.1% market share of the franchised public transport market, making it the most popular transport option in Hong Kong. The integration of the Octopus smart card fare-payment technology into the MTR system in September 1997 has further enhanced the ease of commuting on the MTR.

Construction of the MTR was prompted by a study, released in 1967, commissioned by the Hong Kong Government in order to find solutions to the growing road congestion problem caused by the expansion of the then-colony's economy. Construction started soon after the release of the study, and the first line opened in 1979. The MTR was immediately popular with residents of Hong Kong; as a result, subsequent lines have been built to cover more territory. There are continual debates regarding how and where to expand the MTR network.

As a successful railway operation, the MTR has served as a model for other newly built systems in the world, particularly in mainland China.

MTR (disambiguation)

MTR (Mass Transit Railway) is the mass transit system of Hong Kong.

MTR may also refer to:

MTR (software)

My traceroute, originally named Matt's traceroute (MTR) is a computer program which combines the functions of the traceroute and ping programs in one network diagnostic tool.

MTR probes routers on the route path by limiting the number of hops individual packets may traverse, and listening to responses of their expiry. It will regularly repeat this process, usually once per second, and keep track of the response times of the hops along the path.