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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

menstrual

adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
menstrual period
the menstrual cycle (=relating to the blood that women lose each month)
▪ Illness can disrupt your menstrual cycle.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
blood
▪ But the association of menstrual blood pollutes her and she loses for ever the pristine purity of a female child.
▪ This may refer to the menstrual blood and semen consumed sacramentally by some Gnostic groups.
▪ The causes of endometriosis are not completely known, but seem to be linked to an abnormal flow of menstrual blood.
▪ Female menstrual blood became endowed with magical power and often it was harmful.
▪ Clearly, menstrual blood had somehow been connected with the unfertilized egg and was confused with the abortion of a foetus.
▪ Where blood has a significance, and menstrual blood negatively so, women are granted a kind of power.
cycle
▪ Also, the menstrual cycle of women can seriously disrupt fluid levels, causing in some cases increases of several pounds.
▪ Just knowing that one is participating in a study of the menstrual cycle can increase reports of negative symptoms by 80 percent.
▪ Sometimes a mood, or a phase of the menstrual cycle, will bring about a definite aversion to keeping up appearances.
▪ When women experience problems with their menstrual cycles, such as irregular periods, doctors often give them hormones.
▪ Her own menstrual cycle, including its uncomfortable drawing to a close, had been strictly her own affair.
▪ The mean menstrual cycle length was 28 days.
▪ But confusion reigned over the idea of the menstrual cycle.
▪ Smoking was reported by 260 women. inseminations and follow up Intracervical inseminations were applied in subsequent menstrual cycles.
period
▪ The danger time for development of tubal complications with gonorrhoea is the menstrual period.
▪ Five days after the end of the last menstrual period.
▪ Not a menstrual period in the proper sense.
▪ When arranging your next smear, do not make an appointment during your menstrual period. 4.
▪ Twelve is the present average age for the menarche - or start of menstrual periods, which marks puberty.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But confusion reigned over the idea of the menstrual cycle.
▪ Her own menstrual cycle, including its uncomfortable drawing to a close, had been strictly her own affair.
▪ Just knowing that one is participating in a study of the menstrual cycle can increase reports of negative symptoms by 80 percent.
▪ Of 225 new patients attending our adolescent gynaecology clinic in 1992, 167 presented with menstrual disturbances.
▪ This may refer to the menstrual blood and semen consumed sacramentally by some Gnostic groups.
▪ Uncomfortable though these may be, they do not constitute a mental illness, and they are menstrual, not premenstrual problems.
▪ Women even had to allow some one else to put on and change their menstrual pads.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Menstrual

Menstrual \Men"stru*al\, a. [L. menstrualis: cf. F. menstruel. See Menstruous.]

  1. Recurring once a month; monthly; gone through in a month; as, the menstrual revolution of the moon; pertaining to monthly changes; as, the menstrual equation of the sun's place.

  2. Of or pertaining to the menses; as, menstrual discharges; the menstrual period.

  3. Of or pertaining to a menstruum.
    --Bacon.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

menstrual

late 14c., "pertaining to menses," also (in astronomy) "monthly," from Old French menstruel, from Latin menstrualis "monthly," especially "of or having monthly courses," from menstruus "of a month, every month, monthly, pertaining to a month," from mensis "month" (see moon (n.)).

Wiktionary

menstrual

a. 1 Of or relating to the menses. 2 (context dated English) Occurring once a month; monthly. 3 (context dated English) Lasting for a month.

WordNet

menstrual

adj. of or relating to menstruation or the menses; "menstrual period" [syn: catamenial]

Wikipedia

Usage examples of "menstrual".

But when this period arrives and the menstrual discharge takes place into the vagina, the female will suffer from the retention and accumulation of this secretion, and ultimately a tumor or a protrusion of the membrane which closes the vagina will occur, giving rise to severe pain and other serious symptoms.

At the cessation of the menstrual flow, she generally had a supplementary epistaxis, and on one occasion, when this was omitted, she suffered a sudden effusion into the anterior chamber of the eye.

Liebreich found examples of retinal hemorrhage in suppressed menstruation, and Sir James Paget says that he has seen a young girl at Moorfields who had a small effusion of blood into the anterior chamber of the eye at the menstrual period, which became absorbed during the intervals of menstruation.

A second menstrual failure strengthens this suspicion, although there are many other causes which might prevent the appearance of the menses, such as disease of the uterus, general debility, or taking cold, and all of these should be taken into account.

Menstruation, or the menses, monthly visitation, catamenia, menstrual flow, courses, or periods, usually makes its appearance in the female between the twelfth and fifteenth years, at which time the reproductive system undergoes remarkable changes.

There is recorded an inexplicable case of menstruation from the region of the sternum, and among the curious anomalies of menstruation must be mentioned that reported by Parvin seen in a woman, who, at the menstrual epoch, suffered hemoptysis and oozing of blood from the lips and tongue.

A somewhat similar case is mentioned by Gregory of a mother of 7 children who had never had her menstrual flow.

In one remarkable clinical trial, scientists studying premenopausal women with normal hormone levels and regular menstrual cycling found that bone metabolism rises and falls in harmony with the level of progesterone.

If retroflexion is due to a chronic enlargement of the uterus, caused by abortion or parturition, the patient suffers from an immoderate menstrual flow.

In amenorrhea appearing under such circumstances, pain in the stomach and bowels, sometimes with nausea and headache also accompany the menstrual trouble.

There is recorded an inexplicable case of menstruation from the region of the sternum, and among the curious anomalies of menstruation must be mentioned that reported by Parvin seen in a woman, who, at the menstrual epoch, suffered hemoptysis and oozing of blood from the lips and tongue.

The coexistence of a floating kidney in this case may have been responsible for this hemorrhage, and in reading reports of so-called menstruation due consideration must be given to the existence of any other than menstrual derangement before we can accept the cases as true vicarious hemorrhage.

The results of insufficient protection of the lower extremities are colds, coughs, consumption, headaches, pain in the side, menstrual derangements, uterine congestion and disorders, besides disablement for the ordinary and necessary duties of life.

For example, one study of women undergoing gynecologic surgery indicated that the age of the patient had great diagnostic importance, and that notation of last menstrual period, biopsy of smear, pre-operative hemoglobin, and urine-sediment study were all much less important to making a diagnosis.

Molly and Minni were to begin their menstrual cycles a day before they did.