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The Collaborative International Dictionary

Mendelism

Mendelian \Men*de"li*an\, prop. a. [See Mendel's law.]

  1. (Biol.) Pert. to Mendel, or to Mendel's law; as, Mendelian inheritance.

  2. (Biol.) Behaving or being in accordance with Mendel's laws of inheritance; -- said of the distribution of inherited characteristics and of traits thus distributed. -- Men*de"li*an*ism, Men*del"ism, n.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

Mendelism

1903, in reference to the work of Gregor Johann Mendel (1822-1884), Austrian biologist who enunciated the laws of heredity. Related: Mendelian.

Usage examples of "mendelism".

The first fundamental principle of Mendelism, then, is the existence of relatively constant units, the Mendelian factors, as the basis for transmission of all the traits that go to make up an animal or plant.

This is so much cited in text-books on Mendelism that the student might think it is a common character.

Most of the experiments have been with lower animals and with plants, but recent experiments and statistical studies show that Mendelism is an important factor in human heredity, in such characteristics as color of hair and eyes and skin, partial color blindness, defects of eye, ear, and other important organs.