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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

mend

I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
make do and mend (=when someone manages with the things they have and does not buy anything new)
▪ For many people, make do and mend was a harsh reality.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
fence
▪ The only thing she could do now was find Ana and mend a few fences.
▪ He'd be mending the fence by the garage tomorrow, Saturday.
▪ Is it too late to mend fences with your ex-wife?
▪ Security has tightened since the bombing, but the royal family has tried to mend fences.
▪ Voice over Stephen Morgan wants to mend fences with the council not build obstacles.
ways
▪ As a result of this report the caretaker was informed that if he did not mend his ways he would be discharged.
▪ She wrote back in an unusually cheery vein in-tended to demonstrate, I suppose, that she was mending her ways.
▪ More uniform arrangements will allow good schools to flourish, they say, while forcing bad ones to mend their ways.
▪ This makes it less likely that investors would encourage a dissolute borrower to mend its ways by withholding finance.
▪ More recently, and equally significantly, the colony's stock market had mended its ways.
▪ And attempts to mend its ways are running into trouble.
■ VERB
make
▪ He knew how to change the washer on a tap, and make pastry, and mend a bicycle puncture.
▪ Whatever was made could be mended - that was a saying in these parts.
▪ They can make chairs, mend the loo.
▪ But recent events have shown that they need to learn to make do and mend.
try
▪ So I suggested that we should try to mend things by letting the house and all move to London.
▪ It happened while workmen were trying to mend faulty overhead cabling in the field where the stock were grazing.
▪ We got so fed up with the leaking roof that we decided to try and mend it with some tar.
▪ And questions: to forgive, to try to mend the marriage, or to end it?
▪ I was trying to mend a broken door in the floor of the stage.
▪ Security has tightened since the bombing, but the royal family has tried to mend fences.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
Mending this problem will take more than money.
▪ A pin was inserted to mend the fracture in his foot.
▪ I called a service engineer in to mend the lift.
▪ I need to get my sleeve mended.
▪ The children are taught to mend their own clothes.
▪ Walters was off the team for a year while his ribs mended.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ I can afford new ones, but find myself spending a couple of quiet hours mending them.
▪ I had so little to do I spent all my time fussing over my hair and mending my clothes.
▪ It can cope with a cold, fight off a serious illness and with time, even mend a broken bone.
▪ It used to stick and Emyr has mended it, but Hywel still kicks it.
▪ Moses Mossop was regularly at work making and mending wooden barrels.
▪ Their clothes were mended as well as their bruises, their tempers and their hopes.
▪ They travelled in open formation, picking their way around obstacles and frequently having to stop to mend punctures.
▪ Yes, she agreed with Louise, quarrels could be mended by talking.
II.noun
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Every length of rope had mends and splices.
▪ Robby Thompson, on the mend from shoulder and back injuries last season, continued to have a tremendous spring.
▪ They are still unrepresented in great cities such as Manchester and Liverpool, but they seem at last to be on the mend.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Mend

Mend \Mend\, v. i. To grow better; to advance to a better state; to become improved; to recover; to heal.
--Shak.

on the mend pred. a. recovering from an illness or injury.

Mend

Mend \Mend\ (m[e^]nd), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Mended; p. pr. & vb. n. Mending.] [Abbrev. fr. amend. See Amend.]

  1. To repair, as anything that is torn, broken, defaced, decayed, or the like; to restore from partial decay, injury, or defacement; to patch up; to put in shape or order again; to re-create; as, to mend a garment or a machine.

  2. To alter for the better; to set right; to reform; hence, to quicken; as, to mend one's manners or pace.

    The best service they could do the state was to mend the lives of the persons who composed it.
    --Sir W. Temple.

  3. To help, to advance, to further; to add to.

    Though in some lands the grass is but short, yet it mends garden herbs and fruit.
    --Mortimer.

    You mend the jewel by the wearing it.
    --Shak.

    Syn: To improve; help; better; emend; amend; correct; rectify; reform.

Wikipedia

MEND

Mend or MEND may refer to:

  • Mend (album), a 2006 music album by the Scottish band De Rosa
  • Muslim Engagement and Development, a UK Muslim community funded NGO dedicated to tackling Islamophobia.
  • Mend, Iran, a village in Gonabad County, Razavi Khorasan Province, Iran
  • Middle East Nonviolence and Democracy, a Palestinensian NGO
  • Movement for the Emancipation of the Niger Delta, a Nigerian militant group
  • 2-Succinyl-5-enolpyruvyl-6-hydroxy-3-cyclohexene-1-carboxylic-acid synthase, an enzyme
  • Meet Each Need with Dignity

Mend (album)

Mend is the critically acclaimed debut album by the Scottish band De Rosa. Released in June 2006, it was voted 16th in Mojo’s top 50 albums of 2006. It was recorded by Scottish producer Andy Miller.

Wiktionary

mend

n. 1 A place, as in clothing, which has been repaired by mending. 2 The act of repairing. vb. 1 To repair, as anything that is torn, broken, defaced, decayed, or the like; to restore from partial decay, injury, or defacement; to patch up; to put in shape or order again; to re-create; as, to mend a garment or a machine. 2 To alter for the better; to set right; to reform; hence, to quicken; as, to mend one's manners or pace. 3 To help, to advance, to further; to add to. 4 To grow better; to advance to a better state; to become improved.

WordNet

mend

  1. n. sewing or darning that repairs a worn or torn hole (especially in a garment); "her stockings had several mends" [syn: patch, darn]

  2. the act of putting something in working order again [syn: repair, fix, fixing, fixture, mending, reparation]

  3. v. restore by replacing a part or putting together what is torn or broken; "She repaired her TV set"; "Repair my shoes please" [syn: repair, fix, bushel, doctor, furbish up, restore, touch on] [ant: break]

  4. heal or recover; "My broken leg is mending" [syn: heal]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

mend

c.1200, "to repair," from a shortened form of Old French amender (see amend). Meaning "to put right, atone for, amend (one's life), repent" is from c.1300; that of "to regain health" is from early 15c. Related: Mended; mending.

mend

early 14c., "recompense, reparation," from mend (v.). Meaning "act of mending; a repaired hole or rip in fabric" is from 1888. Phrase on the mend attested from 1802.

Usage examples of "mend".

Kari was doing her end-of-the-week mending by the kitchen window when Alec wandered in with his bow.

In the late hours of the following morning, Christina was mending the hem on one of her skirts when Amine came into the tent very slowly.

I have a gimlet and some nails in my pistol pocket, Baas, that I was using this morning to mend that box of yours.

That day he had been dreaming of the Baptist as he mended the ripped hemp of the nets, and Simon had insisted he tell him all about the wild man of Bethabara.

One day, when he was so drunk as to be unable to attend on me, I began to scold him, and threatened him with the stick if he did not mend his ways.

Therewere always loose backs to be fastened on securely, notes to be erased from margins, pages to be mended, labels to belettered and affixed.

When the decay was gone and the bone fragments fused, she beseeched the goddess to mend the other breaks in his leg and hand.

When they arrived, blue with cold and often breakfastless, Isobel would give each a bowl of broth, and while the lesson proceeded she would mend their ragged garments.

A moment after Manon came in under the pretext of shewing me a piece of lace I had torn away in my attempts of the day before, and of asking me if she should mend it.

A servant came and told me that the wheelwright had arrived, and that he would take four hours to mend my carriage, so I went downstairs.

However, I could not manage it, my carriage broke down, and took five hours to mend, so I had to sleep at another posting station.

But although there was much to be done as well in mending old covers, mounting worn title-pages, and such like, in this department Mr Cupples would accept no assistance.

But, by way of recreation, after the supper dishes had been washed up, Gertie darned socks, mended shirts, patched trousers for the men folk or sewed on some garment for herself.

I told her absently that I should be obliged if she would mend it when she had time, and with this she went out.

Zambelli first gave him oppilative remedies, and, seeing his mistake, he tried to mend it by administering castoreum, which sent his patient into convulsions and killed him.