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Menagerie

A menagerie is a collection of captive animals, frequently exotic, kept for display; or the place where such a collection is kept, a precursor to the modern zoological garden. The term was first used in seventeenth century France in reference to the management of household or domestic stock. Later, it came to be used primarily in reference to aristocratic or royal animal collections. The French-language "Methodical Encyclopaedia" of 1782 defines a menagerie as an "establishment of luxury and curiosity." Later on, the term referred also to travelling animal collections that exhibited wild animals at fairs across Europe and the Americas.

Menagerie (Image Comics)

Olivia “Livvie” Lewis is a fictional comic book superheroine, a member of the superhero team Dynamo 5, which appears in the monthly series of the same name from Image Comics. Created by writer Jay Faerber and artist Mahmud A. Asrar, Slingshot first appeared in Dynamo 5 #1 (January 2007).

For the first 24 issues of the series, the character possessed the power of flight, and went by the codename Slingshot. In issue #25 of the series (October 2009), the character, whose powers had been erased in the previous issue, obtained different powers. Now possessing the power to shapeshift into any animal, she goes by the name Menagerie.

Menagerie (comics)

Menagerie, in comics, may refer to:

  • Menagerie (DC Comics), two DC Comics characters connected with the Elite and Justice League Elite
  • Menagerie (Image Comics), an Image Comics character and member of Dynamo 5

Menagerie (album)

Menagerie is the sixth studio album by American R&B singer Bill Withers, released in 1977 on the Columbia label.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

menagerie

noun
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Isadora arrived with her menagerie of admirers.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A whole menagerie came to life to see, but more importantly to help, Emily play.
▪ But it did include a menagerie of animated characters that crept around the computer screen when the program was running.
▪ Despite the menagerie of insects, there are no bugs in this game.
▪ From his ever-changing complexion to his personal menagerie and private amusement park, Jackson has long cultivated an aura of eccentricity.
▪ Had Red Reg turned up here, one felt certain they would have set the whole menagerie on him.
▪ He solved the Chelsi problem by having her noisily eaten by a Stygian panther in the lab menagerie.
▪ The glasses menagerie I suppose I was ten when the school said I couldn't see.
▪ When one of her menagerie died, Diana dutifully performed a burial ceremony.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Menagerie

Menagerie \Men*ag"er*ie\, n. [F. m['e]nagerie, fr. m['e]nager to keep house, m['e]nage household. See Menial, Mansion.]

  1. A place where animals are kept and trained.

  2. A collection of wild or exotic animals, kept for exhibition.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

menagerie

"collection of wild animals kept in captivity," 1712, from French ménagerie "housing for domestic animals" (16c.), from Old French manage (see menage).

WordNet

menagerie

  1. n. a collection of live animals for study or display

  2. the facility where wild animals are housed for exhibition [syn: zoo, zoological garden]

Wiktionary

menagerie

n. 1 A collection of live wild animals on exhibition; the enclosure where they are kept. 2 A diverse or miscellaneous group.

Usage examples of "menagerie".

Twice each day, the hydrobot returned from its journey to inner space and delivered its real treasure: one-hundred-milliliter aliquots of ice containing a dizzying menagerie of microscopic life never before seen.

They treated us like wild beasts in a menagerie, and the officers and soldiers set the example while the women and children were not behindhand with abuse, and made threatening gestures.

Under the ring, in the cellarage, was housed the menagerie which the imperial beasts had temporarily vacated in favour of those of Colonel Kearney.

The brocaded figure, cross-legged before the biggest pavilion, watched keepers and cowardies move about the tents and cages, listened to the soft animal sounds and breathed through bean-wide nostrils the pattern of smells that reveal the well-regulated menagerie.

He recalled how the street seemed inanely alive with the horrid cheer that haunted zoos and menageries, how the cries of bird sellers, of puppy wallahs and cat peddlers intermingled and created an eerie and disturbing echolalia, at once mocking of and mocked by the chatter of their caged and staring stock in trade.

Next comes the trained elephant, the terror of our mousmes, the equilibrists, the menagerie.

To eulogize Phil properly, recall from the post-apocalyptic junkyard a menagerie of maimed automata -- ersatz sheep, a robot German shepherd, a haggish simulacrum of Secretariat -- and a crew of pertinacious little people, from Lumky to Isidore to Tagomi, then set them singing until they entropically abort.

The skulls and chitin headcases of a menagerie glared dead ferocity from its flanks: toothy and agape, flat, eyeless, horned, lamprey-mouthed with cilia-teeth, bone-ridged, shockingly human, intricate.

He lay listening dreamily to the jolty clatter of the wagons, the shouts of the drivers, and the commotion of the animals in the menagerie cages.

Rounding out the lineup was the rest of our menagerie: two frogs, three goldfish, a hermit crab, a snail named Sluggy, and a box of live crickets for feeding the frogs.

However, the room once more began to smell like a menagerie, and when on the following Friday I found my gentle Sylva tamed at last, it was time to start all over again.

From the time she had been a toddler, she had crawled into this bed on Sunday mornings, dragging her stuffed animals and blankies with her, her menagerie as much a part of the weekend routine as the funny papers and the croissants and jam and tea that Delphine always brought upstairs on the breakfast tray.

He could see them all well enough, arranged by physiognomic type around the table, a menagerie of cunning and talkative gentlefolk, only the weird names he could not always say aloud.

That menagerie is nothing but smouldering pieces scattered for leagues across the plain.

It was a rare sunny day, and the menagerie was thronged with nobility and their servants.