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The Collaborative International Dictionary

Menaced

Menace \Men"ace\ (m[e^]n"[asl]s; 48), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Menaced ([=a]st); p. pr. & vb. n. Menacing.] [OF. menacier, F. menacer. See Menace, n.]

  1. To express or show an intention to inflict, or to hold out a prospect of inflicting, evil or injury upon; to threaten; -- usually followed by with before the harm threatened; as, to menace a country with war.

    My master . . . did menace me with death.
    --Shak.

  2. To threaten, as an evil to be inflicted.

    By oath he menaced Revenge upon the cardinal.
    --Shak.

Wiktionary

menaced

  1. subject to menaces; threatened v

  2. (en-past of: menace)

Usage examples of "menaced".

A league was formed between Elizabeth and James for the mutual defence of their dominions and of their religion, now menaced by the open combination of all the Catholic powers of Europe.

The Brigadier informed me that he had only three anti-tank guns in his brigade, covering four or five miles of this highly menaced coastline.

End is far less menaced, because the Navy and Air Force must make sure that no mass of shipping, still less protecting warships, can be passed into the French Channel ports.

After the conclusion of the treaty, Attila still menaced the empire with implacable war, unless the Azimuntines were persuaded, or compelled, to comply with the conditions which their sovereign had accepted.

Paul, who menaced the Barbarian with instant death, if he rejected the prayer of their successor, is one of the noblest legends of ecclesiastical tradition.

They still knew very little about whatever menaced the grove, save that it had caused an unprecedented fear among the wild creatures.

He might be a poor, useless creature when menaced by the figments of his own fancy.

As none of Master Nathaniel measures brought to light a single smuggler or a single consignment of fairy fruit, the Senate were beginning to congratulate themselves on having at last destroyed the evil that for centuries had menaced their country, when Mumchance discovered in one day three people clearly under the influence of the mysterious drug and with their mouth and hands stained with strangely coloured juices.

The reporter had a vital reason for seeing her immediately, a vital reason for all concerned, above all in this moment when the Nihilists were culminating their plans, a vital reason for her and for him, equally menaced with death, to talk with her and to renew the propositions he had made a few minutes before the poisoning and which she had not wished to hear him talk about, in fearful pity for him or in defiance of him.

It menaced no one other than those who hunted it, who sought to invade its territory, and its death would profit only a dishonorable man and a shrewish wife, and would spread the contamination of Puerto Morada.

His camp was still menaced by the men whom he had repulsed, and he could not weaken it by sending reinforcements up the hill.