Find the word definition

Crossword clues for mask

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
mask
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
death mask
gas mask
masked ball
masking tape
oxygen mask
stocking mask
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
black
▪ Inside the car was a man in a black leather mask.
▪ So he dons black cape and mask and finds romance and adventure as El Zerro!
▪ A woman in her mid forties was dragged into bushes by a man wearing a black stocking mask.
▪ They wore black masks and held what were meant to look like large axes, from medieval times.
▪ During camera rehearsals earlier in the day he was able to cut out, align and stick down his black cardboard mask.
▪ They wore black boots, green military fatigues, had their faces covered with black ski masks and carried automatic weapons.
▪ The attacker was described as white, wearing dark clothes and a black mask.
▪ Some children may therefore adopt a black mask which they wear fiercely but weakly.
white
▪ But can the child transcend the blackness and wear the white mask with pride?
▪ Janet Flanner, cross-legged on the floor, top hat decorated with one black, one white mask.
▪ Benjamin spun round, his face a white mask in the darkness.
▪ Her face was a white powder mask with black eye make-up and black lip gloss.
▪ He looked extremely unhealthy; the anxious eyes of a child peered at her from a white mask.
▪ The next moment Miss Kilspindie's front door opened and a white mask surmounted by a minefield of curlers peered out.
■ NOUN
death
▪ The body is dressed in jewelled vestments, the face covered with a silver mask fashioned from a wax death mask.
▪ It also includes a grainy, retouched photograph of the man holding the death mask in his hands.
▪ The whereabouts of Flaxman's death mask was not known, and nothing came of the suggestion.
▪ There is the coroner from Philadelphia, Gold, with the death mask of the little boy.
▪ A death mask of pieces badly assembled.
face
▪ His speciality - opening his face mask to reveal the electronic workings of his head - had the audience gasping.
▪ He was holding, grabbing guys by the face mask, leg-whipping.
▪ They are protected from head to foot with face masks, caps and white gowns.
▪ It was such a cold month that his mom would not let him sit outside without his Yogi Bear face mask.
▪ Our Oatmeal and Avocado face mask will absorb any impurities or excess oils from your skin.
▪ He positioned his face mask then pulled up his hood.
▪ Wear a face mask when removing this type of system.
▪ Simply smear on a generous amount over your skin after cleansing to make a revitalising face mask.
gas
▪ They took gas masks and attached grenades to their belts.
▪ Delaney snapped on his gas mask.
▪ Some even began wearing gas masks to block the suspicious fumes.
▪ Heard him say that sirens were blowing and people were donning gas masks and moving into sealed rooms.
▪ While they all wore gas masks, none were tightly clothed, and none wore gloves.
▪ Every child had a gas mask and a suitcase, or paper parcel.
▪ Everywhere I went, I carried the gas mask I had purchased on the black market.
oxygen
▪ They placed an oxygen mask on my love and dared me to count up to ten.
▪ The shock was terrific, he gasped into his oxygen mask, his hands clenching involuntarily.
▪ He told me that the oxygen mask had pulled away from my face some, and that I was probably just blacking out.
▪ But he saw nothing, nothing but dark sky: The oxygen mask was filled with sweat.
▪ It felt good sitting there with the oxygen mask off and not having to worry about flak.
▪ They coaxed everything from pygmy mice to snakes to cheetahs into running on a treadmill while wearing an oxygen mask.
▪ He remembered his oxygen mask and placed it over his mouth after removing the smog mask.
▪ The car with its whirring air conditioning was like an oxygen mask.
ski
▪ He is of slim to medium build and was wearing a dark ski mask.
▪ An early police report said the men had been wearing ski masks.
▪ They were later seen wearing ski masks and driving the vehicles across the Denes area.
▪ Pappas was shot by two men wearing ski masks.
▪ The girl has told officers her attacker was taller than her and wore a ski mask.
▪ The rapist had worn a ski mask, but she knew his approximate height and his coloring.
▪ They wore black boots, green military fatigues, had their faces covered with black ski masks and carried automatic weapons.
▪ In winter he wears up to four layers of clothing, a ski mask, gloves.
stocking
▪ A woman in her mid forties was dragged into bushes by a man wearing a black stocking mask.
■ VERB
pull
▪ On impulse, and against his better judgment, he pulled off his own mask.
▪ After a few minutes, they were ordered to pull their masks back and take a whiff.
▪ A second lay on the floor, writhing and trying to pull the mask off his face.
▪ He pulled the mask forward slowly, relying for his protection on Forster while he was temporarily blinded.
▪ Don't try and pull off your mask.
put
▪ George frowned as he put his mask neatly in the brown carrier bag before driving home.
▪ They put on gloves and masks to remove strips of insulation in the loft.
▪ When insulted, they stripped to the waist, put on hideous driftwood masks and sang nasty songs at each other.
▪ She had them put an oxygen mask over Matthew's face immediately.
remove
▪ The man fell against the altar, trying to remove the mask from his face.
▪ Posing in a tableau, they artfully remove their masks, only to reveal more masks underneath.
▪ He remembered his oxygen mask and placed it over his mouth after removing the smog mask.
use
▪ Williams and Bailey recently described using a reinforced laryngeal mask for adenotonsillectomy.
wear
▪ As I said she wore a mask, and a rich black cloak with white lambswool trimmings.
▪ Some even began wearing gas masks to block the suspicious fumes.
▪ Sir, if that was my master, why was he wearing a mask over his face?
▪ They wear custom, low-volume masks.
▪ The demonic figures wearing ugly masks and straw and brushwood clothes are intended to scare away evil spirits.
▪ The tribesmen assumed the names of beasts and in their rites wore animal masks.
▪ You will need to think carefully about modifiers for wearing a mask.
▪ They appeared with starlets at cabarets, guested on game shows and even flirted with politics, always wearing their masks.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ In Japanese Kabuki theater, the actors wear special masks.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ At the Spinning Wheel Puppets exhibit, children can create masks and puppets.
▪ But can the child transcend the blackness and wear the white mask with pride?
▪ His face was a mask, friendly, but in an impersonal way.
▪ I put my hand over my nose and mouth like a surgical mask just in case I inhaled any of Senga.
▪ Keep the gondola, the mask too.
▪ Workers in surgical masks are running a hydraulic compressor and tractor-trailer drivers are warming up their big rigs.
▪ You will need to think carefully about modifiers for wearing a mask.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
fact
▪ This generalisation, however, masks the fact that there are considerable variations from country to country in each of these regions.
▪ And that masks the fact that most of the growth occurred from 1960 to 1975.
▪ This recent reduction should not mask the fact that casualties in this age group still exceed the 1981-85 baseline.
gas
▪ Is wearing a gas mask the only way you can open the refrigerator without gagging?
reality
▪ There is a danger that a concentration on spatial manifestation masks the realities of social processes, that space itself is fetishised.
▪ The illusion of a company orientation masks the reality of behaviors designed to achieve personal objectives.
▪ The problem with modernity, Enlightenment man's home is that it masks the reality of his hopelessness from him.
▪ In most cases, a clever illusion masks a different reality.
▪ But the words masked the meaning and reality from the crowds of fallen men and angels who were awaiting the final denouement.
■ VERB
use
▪ Veneers were used only to mask carpentry mistakes.
▪ In an age when many shops use decals or masking tape and spray paint, Olin still paints his pinstripes by hand.
▪ They can be used to mask more controversial issues in the same way as usage of the labels purpose or reasonableness.
▪ Officers feared the boy had been killed and that cleanser was used to mask the smell.
▪ She had used make-up skilfully to mask her bruise, and with the subdued stage light it was scarcely visible.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ His public image masked a history of divorce and family problems.
▪ Small children find it hard to mask their emotions.
▪ The wall can be cleaned of graffiti and masked by vegetation.
▪ Throughout history, herbs and spices have masked odors and unpleasant flavors.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ All of this mumbo-jumbo masks a large vacuum of uncertainty.
▪ And he thinks the gloss that surrounds some 4AD groups is only there to mask the lack of real songs.
▪ It occurred to her that her inability to contemplate changing her teaching methods might mask an actual inability to change them.
▪ It reflects the inviolability of family life that in our society helps to mask the darker side of caring and dependency.
▪ Quiet reaction in camps masks desperation of boat people.
▪ Some may mask instead of eliminate the odor, and others are not safe for use around food.
▪ To deny our depression, to mask it, or to try to escape it for ever leads to misery.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Mask

Mask \Mask\ (m[.a]sk), n. [F. masque, LL. masca, mascha, mascus; cf. Sp. & Pg. m['a]scara, It. maschera; all fr. Ar. maskharat buffoon, fool, pleasantry, anything ridiculous or mirthful, fr. sakhira to ridicule, to laugh at. Cf. Masque, Masquerade.]

  1. A cover, or partial cover, for the face, used for disguise or protection; as, a dancer's mask; a fencer's mask; a ball player's mask.

  2. That which disguises; a pretext or subterfuge.

  3. A festive entertainment of dancing or other diversions, where all wear masks; a masquerade; hence, a revel; a frolic; a delusive show.
    --Bacon.

    This thought might lead me through the world's vain mask.
    --Milton.

  4. A dramatic performance, formerly in vogue, in which the actors wore masks and represented mythical or allegorical characters.

  5. (Arch.) A grotesque head or face, used to adorn keystones and other prominent parts, to spout water in fountains, and the like; -- called also mascaron.

  6. (Fort.)

    1. In a permanent fortification, a redoubt which protects the caponiere.

    2. A screen for a battery.

  7. (Zo["o]l.) The lower lip of the larva of a dragon fly, modified so as to form a prehensile organ.

  8. A person wearing a mask; a masker.

    The mask that has the arm of the Indian queen.
    --G. W. Cable.

  9. (Sporting) The head or face of a fox.

    Mask house, a house for masquerades. [Obs.]

    Death mask, a cast of the face of a dead person.

Mask

Mask \Mask\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Masked; p. pr. & vb. n. Masking.]

  1. To cover, as the face, by way of concealment or defense against injury; to conceal with a mask or visor.

    They must all be masked and vizarded.
    --Shak.

  2. To disguise; to cover; to hide.

    Masking the business from the common eye.
    --Shak.

  3. (Mil.)

    1. To conceal; also, to intervene in the line of.

    2. To cover or keep in check; as, to mask a body of troops or a fortress by a superior force, while some hostile evolution is being carried out.

Mask

Mask \Mask\, v. i.

  1. To take part as a masker in a masquerade.
    --Cavendish.

  2. To wear a mask; to be disguised in any way.
    --Shak.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
mask

1530s, from Middle French masque "covering to hide or guard the face" (16c.), from Italian maschera, from Medieval Latin masca "mask, specter, nightmare," of uncertain origin, perhaps from Arabic maskharah "buffoon, mockery," from sakhira "be mocked, ridiculed." Or via Provençal mascarar, Catalan mascarar, Old French mascurer "to black (the face)," perhaps from a Germanic source akin to English mesh (q.v.). But compare Occitan mascara "to blacken, darken," derived from mask- "black," which is held to be from a pre-Indo-European language, and Old Occitan masco "witch," surviving in dialects; in Beziers it means "dark cloud before the rain comes." [See Walther von Wartburg, "Französisches Etymologisches Wörterbuch: Eine Darstellung galloromanischen sprachschatzes"]. Figurative use by 1570s.

mask

1560s, "take part in a masquerade;" 1570s, "to disguise;" 1580s, "to wear a mask," from mask (n.). Figurative use by 1580s. Extended sense of "to disguise" is attested from 1847. Related: Masked; masking. Masking tape recorded from 1927; so called because it is used to block out certain surfaces before painting.

Wiktionary
mask

Etymology 1 alt. 1 A cover, or partial cover, for the face, used for disguise or protection. 2 That which disguises; a pretext or subterfuge. 3 A festive entertainment of dancing or other diversions, where all wear masks; a masquerade 4 A person wearing a mask. 5 (context obsolete English) A dramatic performance, formerly in vogue, in which the actors wore masks and represented mythical or allegorical characters. 6 (context architecture English) A grotesque head or face, used to adorn keystones and other prominent parts, to spout water in fountains, and the like; -- called also mascaron. 7 (context fortification English) In a permanent fortification, a redoubt which protects the caponiere. 8 (context fortification English) A screen for a battery 9 (context zoology English) The lower lip of the larva of a dragonfly, modified so as to form a prehensile organ. 10 (context Puebloan anthropology English) A ceremonial object used in Puebloan kachina cults that resembles a Euro-American masks. (The term is objected as an appropriate translation by Puebloan peoples as it emphasizes imitation but ignores power and representational intent.) 11 (context computing programming English) A pattern of bits used in bitwise operations; bitmask. 12 (context computer graphics English) A two-color (black and white) bitmap generated from an image, used to create transparency in the image. n. 1 A cover, or partial cover, for the face, used for disguise or protection. 2 That which disguises; a pretext or subterfuge. 3 A festive entertainment of dancing or other diversions, where all wear masks; a masquerade 4 A person wearing a mask. 5 (context obsolete English) A dramatic performance, formerly in vogue, in which the actors wore masks and represented mythical or allegorical characters. 6 (context architecture English) A grotesque head or face, used to adorn keystones and other prominent parts, to spout water in fountains, and the like; -- called also mascaron. 7 (context fortification English) In a permanent fortification, a redoubt which protects the caponiere. 8 (context fortification English) A screen for a battery 9 (context zoology English) The lower lip of the larva of a dragonfly, modified so as to form a prehensile organ. 10 (context Puebloan anthropology English) A ceremonial object used in Puebloan kachina cults that resembles a Euro-American masks. (The term is objected as an appropriate translation by Puebloan peoples as it emphasizes imitation but ignores power and representational intent.) 11 (context computing programming English) A pattern of bits used in bitwise operations; bitmask. 12 (context computer graphics English) A two-color (black and white) bitmap generated from an image, used to create transparency in the image. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To cover, as the face, by way of concealment or defense against injury; to conceal with a mask or visor. 2 (context transitive English) To disguise; to cover; to hide. 3 (context transitive military English) To conceal; also, to intervene in the line of. 4 (context transitive military English) To cover or keep in check. 5 (context intransitive English) To take part as a masker in a masquerade 6 (context intransitive English) To wear a mask; to be disguised in any way 7 (context transitive computing English) To set or unset (certain bits, or binary digits, within a value) by means of a bitmask. 8 (context transitive computing English) To disable (an interrupt, etc.) by unsetting the associated bit. Etymology 2

n. 1 A mesh. 2 (context UK dialectal Scotland English) The mesh of a net; a net; net-bag. Etymology 3

n. (context UK dialectal English) mash. vb. 1 (context transitive UK dialectal English) To mash. 2 (context transitive UK dialectal English) (context brewing English) To mix malt with hot water to yield wort. 3 (context UK dialectal Scotland English) To prepare tea in a teapot; alternative to brew. Etymology 4

vb. (context transitive UK dialectal English) To bewilder; confuse.

WordNet
mask
  1. n. a covering to disguise or conceal the face

  2. activity that tries to conceal something; "no mask could conceal his ignorance"; "they moved in under a mask of friendship"

  3. a party of guests wearing costumes and masks [syn: masquerade, masque]

  4. a protective covering worn over the face

mask
  1. v. hide under a false appearance; "He masked his disappointment" [syn: dissemble, cloak]

  2. put a mask on or cover with a mask; "Mask the children for Halloween" [ant: unmask]

  3. cover with a sauce; "mask the meat"

  4. shield from light [syn: block out]

Wikipedia
Mask

A mask is an object normally worn on the face, typically for protection, disguise, performance, or entertainment. Masks have been used since antiquity for both ceremonial and practical purposes. They are usually worn on the face, although they may also be positioned for effect elsewhere on the wearer's body. In parts of Australia, giant totem masks cover the body, whilst Inuit women use finger masks during storytelling and dancing.

Mask (computing)

In computer science, a mask is data that are used for bitwise operations, particularly in a bit field.

Using a mask, multiple bits in a byte, nibble, word (etc.) can be set either on, off or inverted from on to off (or vice versa) in a single bitwise operation.

Mask (disambiguation)

A mask is a covering worn on the face.

See also: The Mask (disambiguation)

Mask also may refer to:

Mask (Vangelis album)

Mask (sometimes The Mask) is a 1985 album by the Greek electronic music composer Vangelis. It was the last album he produced while living in London, and also the last he produced for the Polydor label. It is dramatic work in six movements, with somewhat dark mood and classical style which branches into ethnic styles. It reached #69 in the UK album charts.

Mask (Bauhaus album)

Mask is the second studio album by English post-punk band Bauhaus. It was released in 1981 by record label Beggars Banquet.

Mask (DC Comics)

The Mask is a fictional character who first appeared in the DC Comics' universe in the Wonder Woman series as a masked villain. She has the same name as a male character from the Dark Horse Comics whose secret identity is Stanley Ipkiss.

Mask (film)

Mask is a 1985 American drama film directed by Peter Bogdanovich, starring Cher, Sam Elliott, and Eric Stoltz with supporting roles done by Dennis Burkley, Laura Dern, Estelle Getty, and Richard Dysart. Cher received the 1985 Cannes Film Festival award for Best Actress. The film is based on the life and early death of Roy L. "Rocky" Dennis, a boy who suffered from craniodiaphyseal dysplasia, an extremely rare disorder known commonly as lionitis due to the disfiguring cranial enlargements that it causes. Mask won the Academy Award for Best Makeup while Cher and Stoltz received Golden Globe nominations for their performances.

Mask (Aco album)

Mask is the seventh studio album by Japanese singer-songwriter Aco, released on 22 February 2006. It is a mini-album consisting of six songs and with a total playing time of 25 minutes.

Mask marks a significant transition in Aco's style from ambient, electronic sounds of her previous two albums, Material and Irony, to lighter, electro-pop music.

Track 3 is a cover of the song of the same name by The Waitresses.

Mask (Roger Glover album)

Mask is the third solo album by Deep Purple bassist Roger Glover released on June 18, 1984 in Europe by 21 Records/ Polydor. The album was promoted with a couple of music videos. It was reissued on CD twice in the UK: in 1993 (Connoisseur Collection, b/w "Elements") and in 2005 ( Cherry Red/Lemon). None of these releases featured bonus material.

Mask (2015 TV series)

Mask is a 2015 South Korean television series starring Soo Ae, Ju Ji-hoon, Yeon Jung-hoon and Yoo In-young. It aired on SBS from May 27 to July 30, 2015 on Wednesdays and Thursdays at 21:55 for 20 episodes.

Usage examples of "mask".

Since my seafarer mask had so affrighted her, I slipped that off, too.

But as soon as they were united at Anagni and Fundi, in a place of security, they cast aside the mask, accused their own falsehood and hypocrisy, excommunicated the apostate and antichrist of Rome, and proceeded to a new election of Robert of Geneva, Clement the Seventh, whom they announced to the nations as the true and rightful vicar of Christ.

The philosopher, who considered the system of polytheism as a composition of human fraud and error, could disguise a smile of contempt under the mask of devotion, without apprehending that either the mockery, or the compliance, would expose him to the resentment of any invisible, or, as he conceived them, imaginary powers.

Dropping into the big chair behind his desk, the Archon pulled off his mask and gloves.

But Navdaq turned away, the conversation over, and resumed its trek to the Autocrat, leading Jane way, Neelix, and Tuvok himself while the Vulcan began finally to come to peace inside himself, suppressing the powerful emotions behind the mask of logic and restoring his natural equilibrium.

 The autopilot was taking the aircraft down, as fast as it could safely go, into the thicker atmosphere at 30,000 feet where they would find enough ambient pressure to make the oxygen masks workable.

Huddled in the rear seat of the autorickshaws with Deepti, I wore a smog mask and goggles to protect my delicate eye make-up.

My anticipation renewed as I closed one eye, my face mask and powered autoscope narrowing my field of vision.

Her porcelain-fair features flushed to rage when discussion touched upon Arithon, or else chilled to an ice-sculpture mask of balked hatred as she choked on the rags of her shame.

His bold, Hanshire arrogance masked a consuming concern, that his plans would be balked despite the extreme measures taken.

This ballet was intended to tell a story with the help of masks, twittering machines, mobile automata, and a large illusionist stage.

Shadow masked him, while his ears rang and burned to the language of wind, singing litanies over bared granite.

The masked bargeman leaned on his pole, and looked thoughtfully about him.

HABITAT CLOSET HALLWAY - SAME TIME Barnes sloshes around the supply depot, piles his arms high with gas masks.

Berry, as her recital declared, was no other than that identical woman who once in old days had dared to behold the baronet behind his mask, and had ever since lived in exile from the Raynham world on a little pension regularly paid to her as an indemnity.