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Maistre

Maistre \Mais"tre\, Maistrie \Mais"trie\, Maistry \Mais"try\, n. Mastery; superiority; art. See Mastery. [Obs.]
--Chaucer.

Wiktionary

maistre

n. (archaic form of master English)

Usage examples of "maistre".

There were little manuals in questions and answers, pamphlets of aggressive tone after the manner of Monsieur de Maistre, and certain novels in rose-coloured bindings and with a honied style, manufactured by troubadour seminarists or penitent blue-stockings.

The Grand Maistre carefully placed the relic in a cedarwood box and locked the box with a gilded key from a chain around his neck.

Grand Maistre could tell that, for all his show of bravado, he was terrified.

Grand Maistre went to the altar and brought out the golden casket in which the Tears of Artamon had been sealed.

The crystal had been passed down from Grand Maistre to Grand Maistre since Lord Argantel had fled Azhkendir, but its true function had been lost over the centuries.

Are you out to discredit me, so that you can become Grand Maistre in your turn?

Joseph de Maistre and his disciples have advocated, let us on the other hand be equally on our guard against accepting the material facts which underlie these beliefs as their deepest foundation and their exhaustive explanation.

While thus recognizing the natural origin of this consecrated symbol, while discovering that it is based on the sacredness of numbers, and this in turn on the structure and necessary relations of the human body, thus disowning the meaningless mysticism that Joseph de Maistre and his disciples have advocated, let us on the other hand be equally on our guard against accepting the material facts which underlie these beliefs as their deepest foundation and their exhaustive explanation.

Magic, natural, 266 Maistre, Joseph de, his theory of mythology, 291, n.

Indian religious sect came to the notice of Count de Maistre, the Jesuit, between 1803 and 1817, and aroused his interest, probably because he thought it might benefit the Society of Jesus.

Prince Kurasov visited Count de Maistre perhaps more often than others.

Prince, frightened out of his wits, stammered that the things confiscated during the search had been turned over to Count Joseph de Maistre, the former Sardinian Ambassador.

The young Jesuit learned how the illustrious Count de Maistre had concerned himself about the future greatness of the Society, how a free-thinking Russian had stolen a secret manuscript and a magic knife from him.

Troplong remarks, after De Maistre, that Seneca has written a fine book on Providence, for which there was not even a name at Rome in the time of Cicero.

The illustrious Count de Maistre, one of the ablest political philosophers who wrote in the last century, or the first quarter of the present, in his work on the Generative Principle of Political Constitutions, maintains that constitutions are generated, not made, and excludes all human agency from their formation and growth.