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Crossword clues for mail

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
mail
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a mailing list (=a list of people that a company sends information to)
▪ If you do not want to be on our mailing list, please tick the box below.
a postal/mailing address (=the place where a letter is sent )
▪ Please give your bank’s full postal address.
an email/mail message (=a message that you receive by email)
▪ Just send me an email message to let me know what time.
certified mail
chain mail
direct mail
electronic mail
express mail
fan mail
▪ The group receives lots of fan mail.
first-class stamp/mail/post etc
hate mail (=letters or messages expressing hate and threats towards someone)
▪ Since appearing on the show she has even received hate mail from the public.
hate mail
▪ She complained to the police after receiving hate mail.
junk mail
mail carrier
mail delivery (also postal delivery British English)
▪ The strike stopped mail deliveries to 20,000 homes and businesses.
mail drop
mail order
▪ It is available by mail order from Green Life Products.
mail slot
mail train
mailing list
▪ I have included you on my mailing list for new EFL software.
snail mail
surface mail
voice mail
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
available
▪ In the past two months there has been a rash of newspaper advertisements for unlicensed patches available by mail order.
▪ These are now available by mail or to personal callers at the show society's Godalming office.
▪ This is available from mail order suppliers fairly cheaply.
▪ A pack of 10 phials costs £19.95 and is available by mail order from Foltene,.
▪ The above are available, mail order from: The Traveller's Bookshop,,.
▪ Prices available on request. Available by mail order from Adrian Arbib, London.
▪ It is available by mail order or at your local hobby shop.
▪ It is only available via mail order from Cordingley Barnes.
direct
▪ The Advertising Standards Authority embraces press, poster, cinema advertising and direct mail.
▪ And, coupons come via direct mail.
▪ Selling direct, by mail order and on the telephone, is cost effective, which means low prices for recession-strapped customers.
▪ Unit costs for brochures, catalogs, and other direct mail pieces.
▪ If you have any serious claims to be a manager you must refuse to accept paperwork direct from the mail room.
▪ News releases, brochures, newspaper advertising, direct mail and public service announcements are also in the works.
▪ The direct mail business is a growth industry.
▪ The program includes brochures, direct mail, television and radio ads, utility bill inserts and the live-operator call center.
electronic
▪ But they do compete in advanced services like electronic mail and computer-data networks.
▪ Send electronic mail to neighborhood leaders in BelairEdison.
▪ Dwight Silverman can receive electronic mail via the Internet.
▪ Some better-known examples are electronic mail, enhanced fax, and electronic data interchange.
Electronic networks, such as electronic mail and computer bulletin boards, extend this changing political identity even further.
▪ The WorldNet Service will include Internet directories and other navigational aides as well as electronic mail.
▪ It happens via electronic mail, in discussion groups and particularly in chat areas, where people type messages to each other.
hate
▪ I was wondering, would you know if any other subscriber to the hunt had received similar hate mail?
▪ From the early days Kylie was plagued by obscene phone calls and hate mail.
▪ Leeds manager Howard Wilkinson claims he received hate mail abuse from fans during last season's disastrous championship defence.
incoming
▪ Mail for guests in residence Any incoming mail for guests should be sorted and placed in the letter rack.
▪ Each neuron is a node where thousands of wires converge, where incoming mail is digested and sometimes turned into outgoing mail.
▪ Most programs can filter incoming mail into designated mailboxes, either as it arrives or afterwards.
▪ I would only trash incoming mail from obvious opponents and obvious loonies.
internal
▪ Then I sort the internal mail for the office.
■ NOUN
air
▪ Onion skin a translucent lightweight paper used in air mail stationery.
▪ In deference to all concerned in the service there was no publicity given to the story of the forgotten air mail.
▪ Unless sent by an air courier, an ocean bill of lading can take as long as a week to arrive by air mail.
chain
▪ Eleventh-century Norman knight with chain mail coat, kite-shaped shield, sword and long lance which could be used from horseback.
▪ It began to appear more convoluted, interlocking chain mail ... some sort of suit.
▪ Knight, mounting his horse, wearing chain mail of the type developed from eastern sources during Barbarossa's reign.
▪ Within a space of some twenty years, chain mail virtually replaced a variety of earlier forms of armour.
▪ Round shields, chain mail and simple conical helmets are clearly visible.
fan
▪ At any rate, the programme drew a large and regular fan mail.
▪ Q: Do you read all your fan mail?
▪ She tells him For Women have been swamped with fan mail and want to do a contemporary shoot.
▪ Q: Do you get fan mail, and do you answer it?
▪ He is happy to receive fan mail at the following address:.
▪ The Barf-O-Rama Web site has generated fan mail from kids eager to share their own gross tales.
▪ He also apologizes for not reading all his fan mail, which requires a staff of five.
junk
▪ She tossed the junk mail in the bin, unopened.
▪ It almost went out with the rest of the junk mail.
▪ Many of us find that even if we bin our junk mail, it continues to arrive.
▪ Often, you have to get unwanted junk mail before you can block it-an unhappy chore at best.
▪ It was just one more item of junk mail, and he wasn't paying for it.
▪ If we create coupon books, how do we get them to the on-line customer without flooding the network with junk mail.
▪ Forty-four percent of the junk mail is never even opened.
▪ Mind you, I do have a relative who has one tried and tested way of getting rid of his junk mail.
message
▪ Please read the specified mail message for more information on the error.
▪ Up to 16 task mail messages may be accessed at one time.
▪ If the entry is blank, the mail message has not been inspected.
▪ They can also exchange electronic mail messages and take part in, or initiate, electronic conferences.
▪ If all the above conditions are met, the new user will be notified by way of a mail message.
▪ The lower field displays the current page number of this mail message.
▪ The submitter also receives an additional mail message if the package has been denied, giving the reason for denying approval.
▪ However, if the mail message has two or more pages, you can use this field to inspect the remaining pages.
order
▪ A pack of 10 phials costs £19.95 and is available by mail order from Foltene,.
▪ They discovered that the pair were also trading at a stall in Abingdon and by mail order.
▪ The above are available, mail order from: The Traveller's Bookshop,,.
▪ There is no mail order facility.
▪ Selling direct, by mail order and on the telephone, is cost effective, which means low prices for recession-strapped customers.
▪ Mail order: Alternatively you may decide to order your lilies via mail order.
▪ Banker's Books, particularly the mail order side, continued to make a useful contribution in spite of the recession.
▪ Available by mail order from Adrian Arbib, London.
system
▪ It should be noted that the mail system and ERROR.LOG file often provide the best indication of the cause of the problem.
▪ TeamLinks, which to date only operates on VAX/VME-based systems, comprises an X.400-based mail system and office automation software.
▪ Some 90% of sales have been for databases, electronic mail systems and Computer Aided Design.
train
▪ As the mail train thundered past and disappeared into the distance he heard the familiar sound of footsteps.
▪ Had some one been killed by the mail train?
voice
▪ It should also enable the integration of electronic mail, voice mail and facsimile, as well as desktop audio and video conferencing.
▪ Hackers may call a company employee and reach their voice mail.
▪ In addition, users can access their voice mail remotely.
▪ Next, he updates his voice mail, letting callers know who they can reach as a back-up.
▪ Rambam printed business cards carrying a working telephone number complete with voice mail.
▪ One afternoon I got home from a business trip, and the first thing I did was check my voice mail.
▪ These include: Features like voice mail, call waiting and call forwarding.
▪ Both computers had a 28, 800-baud fax modem, 16 megabytes of random-access memory and voice mail / speakerphone capabilities.
■ VERB
buy
▪ If you bought mail order, then the first point of contact is the software house or importer concerned.
▪ But if that's not always possible you can now buy them by mail order from HealthMail.
▪ Your legal rights are the same when you buy mail order as from a shop.
check
▪ This identifier should be noted and used to check the mail in the mail options 6.0.0 - Mail System.
▪ One afternoon I got home from a business trip, and the first thing I did was check my voice mail.
▪ It will include a sophisticated x-ray machine to check all in-coming mail and courier packages.
create
▪ In addition, Audio Editor lets users create, playback and mail audio files and annotate text files with audio playback.
deliver
▪ The rattle of the letterbox told her that the postman had just delivered the mail.
▪ Postmen were told they might have to take special precautions when delivering mail to farms.
inspect
▪ It is important, therefore, to inspect the resultant mail message.
▪ Select Option 6.1.1, Inspect Individual Mail, and inspect the mail message.
▪ After inspecting an item of mail, each user can elect to delete the message or retain it for later examination.
open
▪ He lived from hand to mouth making instant resolves every time he opened his mail.
▪ His manner had been exaggeratedly polite and impersonal when they had opened the mail together earlier.
▪ Who was opening the mail with Luke?
▪ Constance would work for de Levantiére answering the telephone, opening the mail and doing any other chores that arose.
▪ The whereabouts of the other two tureens are still unknown and every time I open the mail I hold out some hope.
▪ Then you have to allow that Kemp probably doesn't open his own mail.
read
▪ This is to encourage you to read your mail regularly and clear out any unnecessary messages.
▪ Q: Do you read all your fan mail?
▪ I think they're targeting one or two City firms and getting the inside track by reading their mail.
▪ Do not read your mail while some one talks.
▪ Please read the specified mail message for more information on the error.
▪ He also apologizes for not reading all his fan mail, which requires a staff of five.
receive
▪ I was wondering, would you know if any other subscriber to the hunt had received similar hate mail?
▪ Dwight Silverman can receive electronic mail via the Internet.
▪ The submitter also receives an additional mail message if the package has been denied, giving the reason for approval being denied.
▪ When receiving registered mail for an expected guest, what procedure would you follow? 3.
▪ You will receive a mail message confirming the outcome of the approval.
▪ I hope you have been receiving mail from me.
▪ I received my mail at the barracks and showered there in the mornings.
send
▪ Mr Virdi denied 11 charges relating to sending offensive mail and the alleged attempt to blame a fellow officer.
▪ Similarly, those outside the university network could not access Web sites or send e-mail.
▪ Entire word processor documents can be sent as mail items to other users on the network.
▪ Turn on your computer and take a tour of the TuscanyCanterbury district. Send electronic mail to neighborhood leaders in BelairEdison.
▪ Two or more users can conduct video phone conversations and access live television pictures or send video mail, for instance.
▪ That includes writing reports, sending electronic mail and cruising the information superhighway.
▪ An estimated 35 million people now send electronic mail.
use
▪ The subjects studied included how to use word processors, how to access Web sites and how to use e-mail.
▪ They can also use the electronic mail facility, exchange files and join a range of interactive discussions and conferences.
▪ They are much less likely to be using mail order.
▪ This identifier should be noted and used to check the mail in the mail options 6.0.0 - Mail System.
▪ Or still using your mail list until everyone is on?
▪ When poorer people do use credit, mail order is the key source for them.
▪ Otherwise, the comment is used in the mail message to inform the package manager that approval has been denied.
▪ Drawn up by the Advertising Association, the new code covers about 90 percent of the companies that use direct mail.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
bulk mail
▪ Spammers regularly extract all the email addresses from Usenet to add to their bulk mail databases.
express post/mail
▪ A friend on the Examiner staff sent a supply of Combat by express mail.
▪ Competition has forced drastic improvements in some areas, such as express mail.
▪ Editing was done via express mail.
▪ The thing will make phone calls, fax, send E-mail, post or express mail, address envelops and post reminders.
▪ There are three principal product areas: letters, express mail and parcels.
second-class mail/post/stamp etc
▪ First-class and second-class mail should be put through the machine on separate runs.
▪ The quantity relative for second-class stamps is 140.0, indicating an increase in numbers bought of 40%.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Is that all the mail that came today?
▪ Sarah brought your mail over.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Dwight Silverman can receive electronic mail via the Internet.
▪ Editing was done via express mail.
▪ No prisoner touches mail before it's been examined by staff.
▪ Rambam printed business cards carrying a working telephone number complete with voice mail.
II.verb
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ It s just an idea - mail me or the group with any suggestions.
▪ Some one calculatingly vicious enough to mail death to people he had never met.
▪ The agents are looking for evidence that puts Kaczynski at each site where a bomb was mailed or placed, officials said.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Mail

Mail \Mail\ (m[=a]l), n. [OE. male bag, OF. male, F. malle bag, trunk, mail, OHG. malaha, malha, wallet; akin to D. maal, male; cf. Gael. & Ir. mala, Gr. molgo`s hide, skin.]

  1. A bag; a wallet. [Obs.]
    --Chaucer.

  2. The bag or bags with the letters, papers, or other matter contained therein, conveyed under public authority from one post office to another; the whole system of appliances used by government in the conveyance and delivery of mail matter.

    There is a mail come in to-day, with letters dated Hague.
    --Tatler.

  3. That which comes in the mail; letters, etc., received through the post office.

  4. A trunk, box, or bag, in which clothing, etc., may be carried. [Obs.]
    --Sir W. Scott.

    Mail catcher, an iron rod, or other contrivance, attached to a railroad car for catching a mail bag while the train is in motion.

    Mail guard, an officer whose duty it is to guard the public mails. [Eng.]

    Mail train, a railroad train carrying the mail.

Mail

Mail \Mail\, v. t.

  1. To arm with mail.

  2. To pinion. [Obs.]

Mail

Mail \Mail\ (m[=a]l), n. A spot. [Obs.]

Mail

Mail \Mail\, n. [F. maille, OF. also maaille, LL. medalia. See Medal.]

  1. A small piece of money; especially, an English silver half-penny of the time of Henry V. [Obs.] [Written also maile, and maille.]

  2. Rent; tribute. [Obs., except in certain compounds and phrases, as blackmail, mails and duties, etc.]

    Mail and duties (Scots Law), the rents of an estate, in whatever form paid.

Mail

Mail \Mail\ (m[=a]l), n. [OE. maile, maille, F. maille a ring of mail, mesh, network, a coat of mail, fr. L. macula spot, a mesh of a net. Cf. Macle, Macula, Mascle.]

  1. A flexible fabric made of metal rings interlinked. It was used especially for defensive armor.
    --Chaucer.

    Chain mail, Coat of mail. See under Chain, and Coat.

  2. Hence generally, armor, or any defensive covering.

  3. (Naut.) A contrivance of interlinked rings, for rubbing off the loose hemp on lines and white cordage.

  4. (Zo["o]l.) Any hard protective covering of an animal, as the scales and plates of reptiles, shell of a lobster, etc.

    We . . . strip the lobster of his scarlet mail.
    --Gay.

Mail

Mail \Mail\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Mailed; p. pr. & vb. n. Mailing.] To deliver into the custody of the postoffice officials, or place in a government letter box, for transmission by mail; to post; as, to mail a letter. [U. S.]

Note: In the United States to mail and to post are both in common use; as, to mail or post a letter. In England post is the commoner usage.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
mail

"post, letters," c.1200, "a traveling bag," from Old French male "wallet, bag, bundle," from Frankish *malha or some other Germanic source, from Proto-Germanic *malho- (cognates: Old High German malaha "wallet, bag," Middle Dutch male "bag"), from PIE *molko- "skin, bag." Sense extension to "letters and parcels" (18c.) is via "bag full of letter" (1650s) or "person or vehicle who carries postal matter" (1650s). In 19c. England, mail was letters going abroad, while home dispatches were post. Sense of "personal batch of letters" is from 1844, originally American English.

mail

"metal ring armor," c.1300, from Old French maille "link of mail, mesh of net," from Latin macula "mesh in a net," originally "spot, blemish," on notion that the gaps in a net or mesh looked like spots.

mail

"send by post," 1828, American English, from mail (n.1). Related: Mailed; mailing; mailable. Mailing list attested from 1876.

mail

"rent, payment," from Old English mal (see blackmail (n.)).

Wiktionary
mail

Etymology 1 n. 1 (label en now regional) A bag or wallet. (from 13thc.) 2 A bag containing letters to be delivered by post. 3 The material conveyed by the postal service. (from 17thc.) 4 (lb en dated) A stagecoach, train or ship that delivers such post. 5 The postal service or system in general. (from 17thc.) 6 (lb en chiefly US uncountable) The letters, parcels etc delivered to a particular address or person. (from 19thc.) 7 (lb en uncountable) electronic mail, e-mail: a computer network–based service for sending, storing, and forwarding electronic messages. (from 20thc.) 8 A trunk, box, or bag, in which clothing, etc., may be carried. vb. 1 (label en transitive) To send (a letter, parcel, etc.) through the mail. 2 (label en transitive) To send by electronic mail. 3 (label en transitive) To contact (a person) by electronic mail. Etymology 2

alt. 1 (label en uncountable) armour consisting of metal rings or plates linked together. 2 (label en nautical) A contrivance of interlinked rings, for rubbing off the loose hemp on lines and white cordage. 3 Any hard protective covering of an animal, as the scales and plates of reptiles, shell of a lobster, etc. 4 (lb en obsolete rare) A spot on a bird's feather; by extension, a spotted feather. n. 1 (label en uncountable) armour consisting of metal rings or plates linked together. 2 (label en nautical) A contrivance of interlinked rings, for rubbing off the loose hemp on lines and white cordage. 3 Any hard protective covering of an animal, as the scales and plates of reptiles, shell of a lobster, etc. 4 (lb en obsolete rare) A spot on a bird's feather; by extension, a spotted feather. vb. 1 (label en transitive) To arm with mail. 2 (label en transitive) To pinion. Etymology 3

alt. 1 (label en chiefly Scottish) A monetary payment or tribute. 2 (label en chiefly Scottish) rent. 3 (label en chiefly Scottish) tax. n. 1 (label en chiefly Scottish) A monetary payment or tribute. 2 (label en chiefly Scottish) rent. 3 (label en chiefly Scottish) tax.

WordNet
mail
  1. v. send via the postal service; "I'll mail you the check tomorrow" [syn: get off]

  2. cause to be directed or transmitted to another place; "send me your latest results"; "I'll mail you the paper when it's written" [syn: post, send]

mail
  1. n. the bags of letters and packages that are transported by the postal service

  2. the system whereby messages are transmitted via the post office; "the mail handles billions of items every day"; "he works for the United States mail service"; "in England they call mail `the post'" [syn: mail service, postal service, post]

  3. a conveyance that transports mail

  4. any particular collection of letters or packages that is delivered; "your mail is on the table"; "is there any post for me?"; "she was opening her post" [syn: post]

  5. (Middle Ages) flexible armor made of interlinked metal rings [syn: chain mail, ring mail, chain armor, chain armour, ring armor, ring armour]

Wikipedia
Mail (armour)

Mail (chain mail, maille) is a type of armour consisting of small metal rings linked together in a pattern to form a mesh. A coat of this armour is often referred to as a hauberk.

Mail

The mail or post is a system for physically transporting documents and other small packages, as well as a term for the postcards, letters, and parcels themselves. A postal service can be private or public, though many governments place restrictions on private systems. Since the mid-19th century national postal systems have generally been established as government monopolies with a fee on the article prepaid. Proof of payment is often in the form of adhesive postage stamps, but postage meters are also used for bulk mailing. Modern private postal systems are typically distinguished from national postal agencies by the names " courier" or " delivery service".

Postal authorities often have functions other than transporting letters. In some countries, a postal, telegraph and telephone (PTT) service oversees the postal system, in addition to telephone and telegraph systems. Some countries' postal systems allow for savings accounts and handle applications for passports.

The Universal Postal Union (UPU), established in 1874, includes 192 member countries and sets the rules for international mail exchanges.

Mail (Apple)

Mail (also known as Apple Mail or Mail.app) is an email client included with the operating systems OS X, iOS and watchOS by Apple Inc. Originally developed by NeXT as NeXTMail, a part of their NeXTSTEP operating system, it eventually became Mail after Apple's acquisition of NeXT.

The current version of Mail utilizes SMTP for message sending, IMAP for message retrieval and S/MIME for end-to-end message encryption. It is also preconfigured to work with popular email providers, such as Yahoo! Mail, AOL Mail, Gmail, Outlook and iCloud (formerly MobileMe) and it supports Exchange. iOS features a mobile version of Mail with added Exchange ActiveSync support, though it notoriously misses the functionality of attaching files to reply emails until the release of iOS 9. The iOS version of Mail is the most popular email client in the world by market share.

Mail (disambiguation)

Mail is a postal service which includes "mail" wherein letters, parcels, and packages are delivered to destinations.

Mail may also refer to:

  • Email, electronic mail
    • Simple Mail Transfer Protocol, a way computers send and receive e-mail
  • mail (Unix), a command line e-mail client in Unix
  • Mail (Apple), an application (aka Mail.app) and an e-mail client made by Apple Inc.
  • Mail (Windows), an application and an e-mail client made by Microsoft.
  • Mail, Shetland, a hamlet on the Shetland Islands
  • Mail (armour), a type of protective body armor
  • Mail (manga), a Japanese comic
  • A post box
  • Greg Mail, an Australian cricketer
  • Mail.ru, web
  • Mail.com, a web portal and web-based email service provider

MAIL may refer to:

  • Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation & Livestock (Afghanistan)

The Mail may refer to:

  • Daily Mail, a British national newspaper
  • An original name for Sunday Mail, an Australian local newspaper
  • The Mail (Zimbabwe), Zimbabwean newspaper

Mailing may refer to several places in Bavaria, Germany:

  • Mailing (Ebersberg), Landkreis Ebersberg, Bavaria
  • Mailing (Gangkofen), Landkreis Rottal-Inn, Bavaria
  • Mailing (Ingolstadt), Bavaria
  • Mailing (Prien am Chiemsee), Landkreis Rosenheim, Bavaria
Mail (Unix)

mail is a command line email client for Unix and Unix-like operating systems.

Mail (manga)

Mail is a horror manga series written and illustrated by Housui Yamazaki. The English translation is published by Dark Horse Comics.

The series centers around , a private eye who investigates cases dealing with ghosts. He uses a broomhandle pistol called and hallowed ammunition to shoot ghosts that may or may not have possessed people and seal them inside the bullets which simply drop to the floor. The bullets are later ritually cleansed at a shrine. The pistol also has the ability to revive the dead by shooting a bullet with a ghost sealed inside into its original body. Akiba does this at the beginning of the third and final volume with the ghost of his childhood friend and she becomes his sidekick.

The series is organized into short self-contained chapters with no overarching plot, though some chapters explore Akiba's backstory. However, most are simple cases that Akiba solves, usually with an introduction by Akiba talking to the reader at the beginning of the chapter.

A Japanese live-action movie adaption has been created from the series. In the movie version Takamasa Suga plays the role of Akiba while Mikoto is played by Chiaki Kuriyama.

Mail (Windows)

Mail is an email and newsgroup client developed by Microsoft and included in the Windows Vista, 8, and 10 operating systems. The main feature of Mail is sending and receiving email. Windows Mail included fairly minimal changes to the application's user interface, but introduced major architectural changes when compared with its predecessor, Outlook Express, and is a fundamentally different application. The different versions do not share a common code base, but they share similar functionality. Like in Outlook and Outlook Express, Mail uses Control + E, not Control + F, to search.

Windows Mail was announced by Microsoft as the successor to Outlook Express on October 10, 2005 via its community website Channel 9.

Unlike Outlook Express, which was available for versions of Windows in the 9x series and Windows NT, Windows Mail is not available for operating systems prior to Windows Vista, and is also not as tightly integrated with the Internet Explorer web browser. It is, however, integrated with Windows Calendar.

Windows Live Mail was introduced in 2007 as an alternative to Windows Mail. Windows Live Mail also serves as the successor to Outlook Express on Windows XP. Unlike Windows Mail, Live Mail was packaged as part of the Windows Essentials suite and was not pre-installed in any version of Windows. Live Mail was intended for Windows 7, which does not have a built-in mail client, and it is also compatible with systems running Windows XP or later.

After Outlook.com stopped supporting Windows Live Mail in June 2016, Microsoft positioned Mail as an alternative. Unlike Live Mail, the Windows 8 and 10 versions of Mail supports Microsoft's Exchange ActiveSync protocol.

Usage examples of "mail".

In the beginning of November I sold shares for fifty thousand francs to a man named Gamier, living in the Rue du Mail, giving up to him a third part of the materials in my warehouse, and accepting a manager chosen by him and paid by the company.

Intracompany mail bins Policy: Intracompany mail bins must not be located in publicly accessible areas.

Her adamantine chain mail was a glossy black, her long white hair neatly braided.

There is no way of knowing how much you will sell fi-om your first advertisement or mailing.

You must approach this in the same way you would initiate the development of a brochure, a catalog, an advertisement or direct mail solicitation.

This can be done by follow-up phone calls from the advertiser or by mail.

We did a mailing to key advertisers, simply looking to create some name recognition.

We offered premiums to this highly targeted list of advertisers for correctly counting the number of times Your Place appeared in the brochure we mailed out.

Traditionally, I recommend outdoor advertising as a complementary program to radio, TV, direct mail and print.

Clodius Afer in amazement, his fingers hesitating in the midst of releasing the laces that held the shoulder straps to the front of his mail shirt.

Apparently overcoming whatever had previously ailed it, the computer began to download Tituss mail.

He dragged on his aketon and scale mail and reached for his sword, and his face was bleak.

And inside the trunk are mail leggings, cowl, mittens, boots, and a leather aketon for protection underneath.

Now beholding the scarred face of him, the tender, smiling lips, the adoration in his grey eyes, she trembled amain and, swaying to him, rested her hands on his mailed shoulders.

The soldier, its eyes glowing bright red in its impassive face, struck its chestplate with a mailed fist, and the apse rang like a bell with the sound.