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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

lighted

adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a lighted candle
▪ A procession moved through the village carrying lighted candles.
a lit/lighted/burning cigarette
▪ Someone dropped a lit cigarette and started the fire.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
candle
▪ Up from the ground floor, a lighted candle in his hand, rumbled Mr Beavis.
▪ He used a familiar and homely test - a lighted candle.
▪ Or, they may be involved in some form of ritual in which the lighted candle has a religious significance.
▪ Doubtless the carver mistook a lighted candle for a flower on the illustration he was copying.
▪ She took a lighted candle in its holder with her, and placed it on the mahogany chest of drawers.
▪ He had obviously told the servants that he had accidentally set fire to his room by knocking over a lighted candle.
▪ In the centre of the table was an iced cake with nine lighted candles on it.
window
▪ Only here and there, as I walked past the seafront hotels, I could see the occasional lighted window.
▪ There's something about one lighted window in an otherwise dark building that teases the imagination.
▪ He stood almost on the same spot as before, and watched the lighted windows of a basement flat across the way.
▪ I had no magic that could open to me any one of those dark doors, lighted windows.
▪ Ellwood walked down the row of trees, then circled the house, staying well back from the lighted windows.
▪ He passed the lighted windows of the Incident Room and continued on towards Benson's.
▪ Broussac, on our way home, stopped to jeer in at the lighted windows of Master Ferrebourg's office.
▪ As they rounded another bend she saw the lighted windows of the Swan Inn, relief swept through her.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Gazzer could see Tony going into the lighted ticket-booth to read his comic.
▪ I've got stories: equipment getting trashed, feet through speakers, Ginger would throw lighted cigarettes in my hair!
▪ I had no magic that could open to me any one of those dark doors, lighted windows.
▪ On the white-painted wall of the lobby were several outsize representations of lighted cigarettes with a diagonal red line drawn through them.
▪ Only here and there, as I walked past the seafront hotels, I could see the occasional lighted window.
▪ There's something about one lighted window in an otherwise dark building that teases the imagination.
WordNet

lighted

  1. adj. set afire or burning; "the lighted candles"; "a lighted cigarette"; "a lit firecracker" [syn: lit] [ant: unlighted]

  2. provided with artificial light; "illuminated advertising"; "looked up at the lighted windows"; "a brightly lit room"; "a well-lighted stairwell" [syn: illuminated, lit, well-lighted]

The Collaborative International Dictionary

lighted

lighted \lighted\ adj.

  1. set afire or burning.

    Syn: ignited, enkindled, kindled, lit.

  2. Illuminated by artificial light; as, lighted by a high-powered searchligh.

    Syn: illuminated, lit, well-lighted.

Wiktionary

lighted

  1. Filled with light; illuminated. v

  2. (en-past of: light)

Usage examples of "lighted".

I could observe closely these curious walls, for perpendicularly they were more than 300 yards deep, and our electric sheets lighted up this calcareous matter brilliantly.

On a sudden, the scene was changed: sorrow and lamentation were discarded, the glad name of Iacchus passed from mouth to mouth, the image of the God, crowned with myrtle and bearing a lighted torch, was borne in joyful procession from the Ceramicus to Eleusis, where, during the ensuing night, the initiation was completed by an imposing revelation.

Ceremonies of the Mysteries conducted in caverns dimly lighted, 383-l.

Charity for others like ourselves lighted by a ray of Divine Intelligence, 861-u.

For here was a great bedroom well lighted and warmed with another log fire, also added to but lately, for the top logs were fresh, which sent a hollow roar up the wide chimney.

When the sun grew so high this morning that it struck the top of the great gateway opposite my window, the high spot which it touched seemed to me as if the dove from the ark had lighted there.

Then he took from his bag the lantern, which he lit, and also two wax candles, which, when lighted, he stuck by melting their own ends, on other coffins, so that they might give light sufficient to work by.

Let the reader picture to himself the hall of the vastest cathedral he ever stood in, windowless indeed, but dimly lighted from above, presumably by shafts connected with the outer air and driven in the roof, which arched away a hundred feet above our heads, and he will get some idea of the size of the enormous cave in which we found ourselves, with the difference that this cathedral designed by nature was loftier and wider than any built by man.

This apartment was not nearly so well lighted as the vast stalactite ante-cave, and at the first glance all I could discern was a massive stone table running down its length, with a colossal white figure at its head, and lifesized white figures all round it.

Our prison was suddenly lighted, that is to say, it became filled with a luminous matter, so strong that I could not bear it at first.

I had passed through the door, I found myself in a kind of passage lighted by electricity, similar to the waist of a ship.

This engine-room, clearly lighted, did not measure less than sixty-five feet in length.

And, provided with a lentil, he lighted a fire of dead wood that crackled joyously.

I thought at first that the beacon had been lighted, and was casting its electric radiance into the liquid mass.

Just then the luminous globe that lighted the cell went out, and left us in total darkness.