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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

lie

I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a mist hangs/lies somewhere (=stays in a place)
▪ A thick mist lay on the hills.
a web of intrigue/deceit/deception/lies etc
barefaced lies
▪ Why are you telling such barefaced lies?
be/lie at the root of sth (=be the cause of something)
▪ Allergies are at the root of a lot of health problems.
be/lie at the root of sth
▪ the liberal economic policies which lie at the root of American power
draw up/lay down a code (=create one)
▪ The syndicate decided to draw up a code of conduct for its members.
fit/lay a carpet (=cut it to fit a room and fix it to the floor)
▪ Will it cost extra to have the carpet fitted?
give your life/lay down your life (=die in order to save other people, or because of a strong belief)
▪ These men gave their lives during the war to keep us free.
have a lie down
▪ I’m going upstairs to have a lie down.
hope lies in/with sth (=something gives people hope)
▪ Our real hope lies with a vaccine.
lay a pipe
▪ They were digging a trench to lay water pipes.
lay down a principle (=describe a principle and make it accepted)
▪ The report lays down general principles for the teaching of English.
lay down/establish ground rules for sth
▪ Our book lays down the ground rules for building a patio successfully.
lay down/set/impose conditions (=say what sb must agree to)
▪ They laid down certain conditions before agreeing to the ceasefire.
lay flat on...back
▪ That night I lay flat on my back and stared up at the ceiling.
lay flat
▪ He lay flat on the floor.
lay mines (=put them in place)
▪ They learnt how to lay mines.
lay off employees (=stop employing them because there is no work for them to do)
▪ Unions fear that many part-time employees will be laid off.
lay on/put on entertainment (=organize and provide it)
▪ The organizers laid on some entertainment for the children.
lay reader
lay...eggs
▪ Blackbirds lay their eggs in March.
lay...foundations
▪ It took the builders three weeks to lay the foundations.
lay/place sth end to end (=in a line, with the ends touching)
▪ The roof tiles are laid end to end.
lay/run a cable (=put one in position somewhere)
▪ In the 1860s the first cables were laid under the oceans.
lay/set a trap (for sb)
▪ Mr Smith has walked straight into a trap laid by the Tories.
leave...lying about
▪ Don’t leave tools lying about.
lie ahead
▪ Problems may lie ahead.
lie awake
▪ Kate lay awake thinking about what had happened.
lie dead
▪ If I’m late, Mum worries that I’m lying dead somewhere.
lie detector test
▪ He was asked to take a lie detector test.
lie detector
▪ He was asked to take a lie detector test.
lie down
▪ I’m going upstairs to have a lie down.
lie fallow
▪ They let the land lie fallow for a year.
lie on the beach
▪ I find it boring just lying on the beach all day.
lie/remain dormant
▪ The seeds remain dormant until the spring.
lie/wait in ambush
▪ Armed police lay in ambush behind the hedge.
lying idle
▪ I cannot afford to leave the land lying idle.
lying prostrate
▪ They found him lying prostrate on the floor.
place/lay emphasis on sthformal
▪ The coach has placed the emphasis firmly on youth by including three teenagers in the team.
place/put/lay a bet on sth
▪ She placed a bet on a horse called Beethoven.
prepare/lay the ground (=to provide the situation or conditions in which something can develop successfully)
sb's/sth's strength lies in sth
▪ The show's strength lies in the fact that it appeals to all ages.
sb’s/sth’s future lies in/with sth (=it is in a particular thing )
▪ The country’s economic future lies with its skilled workforce.
set/lay down a standard
▪ The government sets standards that all hospitals must reach.
set/lay the table (=put knives, forks etc on a table before a meal)
▪ The table was set for fourteen.
sit/lie/sleep on the floor
▪ Officers found her lying face down on the floor.
spread lies/gossip
▪ How dare you spread such vicious lies!
▪ Has someone been spreading malicious gossip?
stand/sit/lie motionless
▪ The men stood motionless as Weir held his finger to his lips.
sth’s origins lie in sth (=something comes from a particular place or or develops from a particular situation)
▪ a grape whose origins lie in northern Italy
▪ The technique’s origins lie in the popular arts of the time.
tell a lie
▪ They told lies about us.
the blame lies with sb (=used to say that someone is responsible for something bad)
▪ In this case, the blame lay with the police.
the problem lies in/with sth
▪ The problem lies in the design of the rocket.
the responsibility lies with sb (=they are responsible for it)
▪ Ultimate responsibility for admissions lies with the Course Co-ordinator.
where your loyalties lie (=who or what you are going to be loyal to)
▪ Do your loyalties lie with your friends or your family?
white lie
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
about
▪ Cod, for instance, lay about nine million eggs into the plankton.
▪ Would I lie about a thing like this?
▪ At least he's not lying about one thing.
▪ What is there to lie about?
▪ He was, in other words, fired for refusing to lie about what he thought were proper marks.
▪ He was testing me out, leaving that cash lying about.
▪ For a while they hang about on trees; then they die, fall off and lie about on the ground.
ahead
▪ Already she was terrified of what lay ahead.
▪ Although generally optimistic, Dan knew that more challenges lay ahead.
▪ We the undersigned, senior members of the world's scientific community, hereby warn all humanity what lies ahead.
▪ Months of testing still lie ahead, with work being done at laboratories across the country.
▪ But that life was over now and a new one lay ahead.
▪ It is my first view of the road that lies ahead.
▪ Then the nakedness was covered: he had seen what lay ahead.
▪ Her surviving crew members, rich with prize money, are unprepared, perhaps, for what lies ahead -- peace.
around
▪ It is also dangerous to pick up needles or syringes that you see lying around.
▪ A writer should write, not lie around dozing in the middle of the day.
▪ Whenever possible he selected ones that contained pieces on the menopause and left them lying around where his wife could see them.
▪ Fossil bones were just lying around in the open.
▪ Falling over toys that have been left lying around can be fatal for elderly people and very serious for children. 3.
▪ Thou shalt not leave illegal things lying around in plain sight.
▪ The rye was growing so tall that Sharpe could not see what lay around the bend.
▪ When it was hot, we all lay around in the grass and talked about stuff.
back
▪ He walked without hesitation to the very front row, sat down and lay back, gazing up at the screen.
▪ Finally she lay back and cradled the crawling-already? girl in her arms.
▪ He lay back on his thick pile of cushions and chuckled.
▪ She held the in her hands in front of her chest and lay back down, facing him.
▪ Ianthe lay back on her pillows.
▪ Thinbill lay back and looked up at the stars.
▪ She lay back in the chair.
▪ It is real-time when you lay back on the delivery table and push like the doctor says.
down
▪ But Will took it lying down - all in a good cause of course.
▪ I used to lie down and have a sleep because I got very tired towards the end with the baby.
▪ You lay down and think about your animals.
▪ They took a peek, and then did everything but lay down and wag their tails.
▪ He was lying down and crying.
▪ They are not taking things lying down as many other Third World people tend to do.
▪ Some one like you is likely to lie down in the street and starve to death.
still
▪ He threw himself, face down, into the two-foot-deep trench and lay still.
▪ Months of testing still lie ahead, with work being done at laboratories across the country.
▪ He lay still, feeling the warm pulse of her body neatly folded against his.
Still lying down, clasp your hands together and reach them as high as you can above your head.
▪ It still lay there on the keys, the fingers extended to form the shape.
▪ It still lay under the trees.
▪ Duncan lay still, confused and wondering why the Army had moved in from the south.
▪ We saw Hunter lying still, after a knock on the head.
there
▪ They lay there together for several minutes gasping and perspiring.
▪ On one particular day I lay there watching a strong, high wind move the clouds.
▪ If it was my father lying there what would I say to him?
▪ Louis to see what opportunity lay there.
▪ Partner reads ... While you are lying there concentrate on your breathing.
▪ She made no attempt to move when he came in, just lay there looking vulnerable.
▪ I also wondered how it was that I could feel so good in an apartment in which there lay a corpse.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a tissue of lies
▪ The Springall business was hidden by a tissue of lies.
be a good/quick/easy etc lay
▪ I don't deny it was a good lay.
be/lie at the bottom of sth
▪ His girlfriend had been woken by the noise, and had found him lying at the bottom of the stairs.
▪ Holman lay at the bottom of the open grave where he'd been roughly dumped.
▪ Knowing that self-interest lay at the bottom of his proposal did not prevent my being grateful.
▪ Mind you're not found lying at the bottom of the steps with a broken neck like Amy Robsart.
▪ The female's sperm storage tubules are sausage-shaped and sperm lie at the bottom of the tube.
▪ The rest, including your own clothes, now lie at the bottom of some deep, evil-smelling swamp.
▪ To deliver water from these depths the pumping machine has to be at the bottom of the well.
▪ Your name will be at the bottom of the letter-why write it twice?
be/lie in ruins
▪ Our economy lies in ruins.
▪ Whole blocks of the city were in ruins after the war.
▪ Abingdon's trade had been waning for some time, with its fulling mills lying in ruins and unemployment rife by 1538.
▪ Elizabeth Jarvis said it was like St Paul's Cathedral, miraculously saved while all around it lay in ruins.
▪ He thought the surrounding towns must lie in ruins now, too.
▪ I have said, and I say again, that Trantor will lie in ruins within the next five centuries.
▪ It was to lie in ruins for another sixty-one years.
▪ Large rural areas lay in ruins.
▪ The centrepiece was a gradual revaluation of the lira against the dollar-a strategy which now lies in ruins.
be/lie/sit sprawled (out)
▪ He was lying sprawled across the pillow leaning on his elbow, his head propped to one side, reading the letter.
▪ His rear gunner lay sprawled dead in the back.
▪ The next thing she knew, she was lying sprawled across the pavement.
▪ The observer lay sprawled across his gun, his blond hair streaming romantically in the wind.
▪ We may see a road accident but we shall never be sprawled out on the tarmacadam like that.
lay a guilt trip on sb
lay an egg
▪ The first episode of the series laid an egg.
▪ A few species laid eggs beneath mounds of rotten vegetation that warmed as it decayed.
▪ Adults grow to varying sizes, depending on food available, and lay eggs in late summer.
▪ Female brush turkeys visit the males' mounds, lay eggs in them, and depart.
▪ Gravid female fig wasps enter figs, lay eggs and die.
▪ In turn the later reptiles could diversify on land when they could lay eggs away from a watery environment.
▪ The wasp lays eggs inside the eggs laid by the whitefly, thereby destroying the whitefly eggs.
▪ These mate, fly away and the females find new plants to lay eggs on.
▪ Within it, they copulate and lay eggs.
lay it on with a trowel
lay sb to rest
▪ At nightfall she was tired and lay down to rest.
▪ Rather it attempted to lay the movement to rest.
▪ She took the pills and lay down to rest with her eyes closed.
▪ Then she lay down to rest in the lounge, surrounded by other women who even here never stopped talking.
▪ We can't even lay him to rest.
▪ Without proof I should really lay the idea to rest.
lay siege to sb/sth
▪ After his victory Edward rallied his troops and marched north to lay siege to Calais.
▪ Almost ten years had passed since they had first laid siege to the town, and it seemed as strong as ever.
▪ He laid siege to the fortress and gradually weakened it to the point of collapse.
▪ In 476 they laid siege to Eion, which guarded the Strymon bridge.
▪ In June 1176 Richard laid siege to Limoges; after a few days resistance Aimar's citadel capitulated.
▪ In less than two generations, since the Second World War, they have laid siege to the academic world.
▪ She had laid siege to the typists' room for some minutes before Marshall had persuaded her downstairs.
lay sth bare
▪ The depth of the problem is laid bare in the fact that 40% of 18- to 25- year-olds are unemployed.
▪ The excavation laid bare the streets of the ancient city.
lay your hands on sth
▪ Government reports, social legislation, anything she could lay her hands on that would better acquaint her with her work.
▪ He will sell anything he can lay his hands on in exchange for drugs, which includes any information he may have.
▪ I know exactly where to lay my hands on them.
▪ I like writing letters and reading anything I can lay my hands on!
▪ Kabari women use whatever birth control technology they can lay their hands on.
▪ Looters carried clothes out of shop windows along with anything else they could lay their hands on.
▪ Monday I felt driven to eat everything I could lay my hands on.
▪ Some one had to overturn the present political arrangements in the Limousin if he was ever to lay his hands on Hautefort.
lay/provide the foundation(s) for sth
▪ Tests on healthy people may lay the foundation for a vaccine to prevent AIDS.
▪ I think you have to lay the foundation for your success in terms of defense and rebounding.
▪ It laid the foundation for an organisation with greater appeal to the deaf themselves, particularly the young.
▪ These arguments provide the foundation for Simmel's account of the contradictory nature of modern life.
▪ This theory also laid the foundation for the modern revolution in our understanding of the deepest parts of the earth.
▪ To generate fundamental knowledge that can lay the foundation for future advances in high-performance computing and communications.
▪ We could say that she is laying the foundations for dressing herself later on.
▪ What is stressed rather is that the same phenomenon provides the foundation for both historical tendencies.
▪ While incomplete, the steps that were taken laid the foundation for Workplace 2000.
lay/put sth to rest
▪ Many of the public's doubts have now been laid to rest.
▪ A second glance put my mind to rest, but for a moment there it gave me a turn.
▪ I think this definitely puts it to rest.
▪ Kwasniewski has said he may dissolve parliament to put the issue to rest and call for new elections.
▪ Rather it attempted to lay the movement to rest.
▪ She took the pills and lay down to rest with her eyes closed.
▪ The time has come to put this to rest.
▪ Then she lay down to rest in the lounge, surrounded by other women who even here never stopped talking.
▪ Without proof I should really lay the idea to rest.
lie back and think of England
lie in state
▪ He lay in state, for ever disgraced.
▪ He lay on the marble slab in the centre of the tiny oblong chapel like a king lying in state.
▪ He may as well have been lying in state.
▪ Jane was fearful for a moment that Flopsy might be lying in state.
▪ President to lie in state while he was still alive.
not lay a finger on sb
pack of lies
▪ It's a pack of lies.
▪ It could all have been a pack of lies that Uncle Max cooked up because it gave him such power over Tawno.
▪ Nicholas frankly admitted that for the most part the reports were a pack of lies.
▪ Or was it all a pack of lies to make me give in?
patent lie/nonsense/impossibility etc
put/lay your cards on the table
▪ If they're willing to put all their cards on the table and negotiate, that's good.
▪ If we want to reach an agreement, we'll have to lay all our cards on the table.
▪ They're willing to put all their cards on the table and negotiate.
▪ Come on, you can lay your cards on the table in this house.
▪ The new rules appear to encourage parties to lay their cards on the table and facilitate early settlements.
put/lay/set down a marker
see/find out how the land lies
set/lay/clap eyes on sb/sth
▪ Bedford disliked Halsey the minute he set eyes on him.
▪ How could she possibly know, since he had not set eyes on the girl?
▪ I bonded on the second night I laid eyes on Hyakutake.
▪ Just hours earlier she had set eyes on the pretty two-year-old and sister Anna-Camilla, seven, for the first time.
▪ Never anywhere have I set eyes on such a one.
▪ No sooner did she set eyes on the gentleman than she recognised his pecuniary position to be merely temporary.
▪ The couple fell in love before they had even set eyes on each other during a six-month long distance courtship.
sit/lie/lean back
▪ Craig sighed and leaned back in his chair.
▪ But no one can sit back in investment clubs and just listen.
▪ He must generate all his own internal discipline against the possible inclination to lie back and enjoy his good fortune.
▪ He sat back on his heels, sorrowfully examining the ruined glove.
▪ He walked without hesitation to the very front row, sat down and lay back, gazing up at the screen.
▪ She heard him returning just as she sat back to admire her handiwork.
▪ Then she lay back on her pillow and they looked at each other as if it was for the first time.
▪ We started to sit back because we were up on the No. 1 team in the nation.
▪ Whatever some think, we don't sit back.
the lay of sth
▪ A lot of people, especially those new to the city, have no concept of the lay of the land.
▪ Failure to recognise slopes until committed to landing Make a point of looking for the lay of the surrounding countryside.
▪ It was therefore an important moment when Tolkien gave Lewis the Lay of Leithian to read in manuscript.
the lay of the land
▪ He's got to get the lay of the land before he makes any decisions.
▪ A lot of people, especially those new to the city, have no concept of the lay of the land.
therein lies sth
▪ The treaty was imposed by force, and therein lay the cause of its ineffectiveness.
time hangs/lies heavy on your hands
you've made your bed and you must lie on it
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ "The witness was lying through his teeth," said Davis, "and should be charged with perjury."
Lie on the floor and put your legs in the air.
▪ Almost every night I lie awake in bed worrying about my family.
▪ Don't lie to me! I know where you were last night.
▪ Frank was lying there flat on his back, snoring away.
▪ Her packed suitcase was lying near the door.
▪ I looked at her face and just knew that she was lying.
▪ I spent most of the morning lying in bed.
▪ Libby switched off the light and lay on the couch, staring into the darkness.
▪ Movie stars always lie about their age.
▪ Now the town lay in ruins.
▪ Recent storms destroyed a wall that had lain undisturbed underwater for thousands of years.
▪ Several letters were lying on the table.
▪ The baby was lying on his back in his crib, perfectly content.
▪ The camera doesn't lie.
▪ The children's clothes were lying all over the bedroom floor.
▪ When they found him, he was lying face down in a pool of blood.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ He lay on the track for five minutes before being rescued by two friends who were also out riding.
▪ It doesn't set out to lie, of course, but it sometimes succeeds.
▪ Now, with the founder gone, these ominous flaws lay glaringly exposed.
▪ Public servants, like children with guns, learn to lie.
▪ She was dressed in a silk kimono and lying on the daybed when he went in.
▪ The immorality lies in the inherent wrongness of people deliberately killing other people.
▪ The jelly cupboard was on its back, its contents lying in a heap in the corner of the bottom shelf.
▪ We were both lying on our backs, our heads on our clasped hands.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
about
▪ Their droppings lay about like scattered handfuls of raisins.
▪ Would I lie about a thing like this?
▪ Cod, for instance, lay about nine million eggs into the plankton.
▪ Brown said some have deliberately injured ducks swimming in the lake and have left fishing lines lying about.
▪ At least he's not lying about one thing.
▪ Dietz could not say whether Erik is lying about alleged abuse by his father.
▪ What is there to lie about?
ahead
▪ Currently, attention is centred on the Irkutsk region's gas and oil resources, but many obstacles lie ahead.
▪ And almost alone among the early Hmong arrivals, he could see that storm signals lay ahead.
▪ Then the nakedness was covered: he had seen what lay ahead.
▪ But remember, dangers lie ahead.
▪ The horse-trading that lies ahead will end only when the three key players have said their piece.
▪ It had been a good spring for the President, but trouble lay ahead.
▪ And what lies ahead in 1993?
▪ What surfaces is the inevitable reckoning with what lies ahead.
around
▪ Lopped off brambles lay around and the long grass was all trampled.
▪ Perhaps there was a bit of bread lying around somewhere.
▪ These can be just those pieces which they find lying around the surface or they can be ripped off the growing plants.
▪ Thou shalt not leave illegal things lying around in plain sight.
▪ It is also dangerous to pick up needles or syringes that you see lying around.
▪ Then parents put up with the toy lying around for another couple of months before they want to get rid of it.
▪ The property room looked like a theatrical battlefield with masks and armour lying around in different stages of completion.
back
▪ The convulsions stopped and Charles lay back exhausted.
▪ I grope; then lie back.
▪ Frank was lying back on the pillows with his eyes closed.
▪ He covered his face and lay back and let the giggles take him.
▪ Laying my pack of cigarettes on the table, I lay back on the bed and looked at the ceiling.
▪ Thinbill lay back and looked up at the stars.
▪ He lay back on his thick pile of cushions and chuckled.
▪ She moaned and lay back, her eyes wide in the darkness.
down
▪ Still shivering, we were made to lie down, men and women in adjoining beds.
▪ He scooped out a hollow and lying down piled the leaves over him like a thick coverlet.
▪ I lay down across the path.
▪ Never mind that old sergeant major of yours won't lie down, you're not doin' any ironing.
▪ His own father would lie down after dinner, light a cigar, and listen to classical music.
▪ Then she lay down, still with her shoes on, and let herself cry.
▪ We set him on the coat, lay down on either side and sobbed along with him.
here
▪ And here lies a fundamental difference of opinion - how should a National Park operate?
▪ I lie here thinking, and then all at once my eyes close.
▪ And here lies a contradiction at the heart of AT&T's original business, even before it tried to get into computers.
▪ Her clothes and hair are soaked; she must have been lying here for a long time.
▪ The key here lies not with personal rivalries, as administrative historians would have us believe.
▪ Now you just lie here and enjoy the rest.
▪ A new territory lay here, in which she must live.
Here lies a central dispute throughout the social sciences, and it is one to which we will often revert.
just
▪ The other phosphorylated region of c-Jun lies just upstream from the C-terminal bZIP domain that specifies dimerisation and DNA-binding.
▪ She had passed out there-or perhaps just lain down and drifted into sleep.
▪ I wasn't going to just lie down and die.
▪ He was just lying there looking at her as if he was dreaming with his eyes open.
▪ You are just lying there with these people washing, dressing and at the same time inflicting pain on you.
▪ He was just lying in the road, looking straight up.
▪ Now you just lie here and enjoy the rest.
▪ And then it just lies there on the screen, with all the inert charm of a well-dressed mannequin.
still
▪ He threw himself, face down, into the two-foot-deep trench and lay still.
▪ The bear fell over and lay still in the water.
▪ This one is about three hours old and still lying in the foetal position in which it emerged from the egg.
▪ The parcel still lay on the table, and both girls had stood up.
▪ It was quite obvious where Miss Rose's interests still lay.
▪ The sixth tanker still lay in the ravine, waiting for a crew to pull it out of the ditch.
▪ Rolling on to his back, he lay still as a corpse with only his face breaking the surface.
▪ We lay still, afraid to show that we were awake.
there
▪ It still lay there on the keys, the fingers extended to form the shape.
▪ But he was tired so he just lay there, listening to the street sounds, and waited for morning.
▪ He lay there, feeling very tender and protective, and put an arm rather tentatively around her.
▪ He lay there for a minute to get his breath.
▪ Both her dear sisters lay there in the basin, cruelly murdered, and cut in pieces.
▪ Between geologist and geology there lies a daunting barrier: the deep and rolling ocean.
▪ Well, then, lie there and believe what you like.
therein
▪ And therein lies the key criticism of Mr Lamont's move towards an energy efficient Britain.
▪ The theory of evolution by natural selection reached out far beyond biology, and therein lies its significance.
▪ She is not afraid of the outside world, but recognizes its beauty, and therein lies a danger.
▪ Not that she dared to hope for a reference from this place! Therein lay her difficulty.
▪ And therein lies a Daley legend.
▪ And therein lies the deepest fascination about records and milestones.
▪ More importantly, the adoption of these practices made the individual worker feel insignificant. Therein lies the problem.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ He lay on the track for five minutes before being rescued by two friends who were also out riding.
▪ It doesn't set out to lie, of course, but it sometimes succeeds.
▪ Now, with the founder gone, these ominous flaws lay glaringly exposed.
▪ Public servants, like children with guns, learn to lie.
▪ She was dressed in a silk kimono and lying on the daybed when he went in.
▪ The immorality lies in the inherent wrongness of people deliberately killing other people.
▪ The jelly cupboard was on its back, its contents lying in a heap in the corner of the bottom shelf.
▪ We were both lying on our backs, our heads on our clasped hands.
III.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
big
▪ These are three big lies that nutritionists and obesity experts say are making the rounds this season.
▪ Having tracked the reform process from the start, we can say the official line is a big, fat lie.
blatant
▪ However, it was obviously a blatant lie that he had no idea that Hewett and Charlton were police officers.
complete
▪ That was her claim, but what followed was a complete lie in terms of the manifesto pledge.
outright
▪ Nothing so tempts us to believe outright lies and unfounded stories posing as science than the sensationalistic schlock therein.
▪ He got up and briefly stepped outside to avoid telling an outright lie.
white
▪ Some orange badges, quite obviously, are gained by telling white lies.
▪ There are white lies and white heat.
▪ Why hadn't she told a white lie and claimed she had a licence?
▪ What did it matter, a little white lie like that?
▪ Do you get just a little sort of tap for a white lie but minced up for murder?
■ VERB
believe
▪ Yet at times such as this Charlotte wished she could still believe all the lies she had been told.
▪ Nothing so tempts us to believe outright lies and unfounded stories posing as science than the sensationalistic schlock therein.
give
▪ But the Cambridgeshire result gives lie to the notion that nice guys can't win.
▪ He heard the calm voice, but could feel the trembling body which gave it the lie.
▪ Does not that hostility to the charter give the lie to the Opposition parties' request for freedom of information?
▪ The quatrain poems give the lie to that.
▪ The Bomb gives the lie to the false Enlightenment doctrine of perpetual progress.
▪ They posed for photographers at the star-studded show, giving the lie to rumours they had been separated for several weeks.
▪ Not far, she said, and then gave the lie by saying she'd plenty of petrol.
live
▪ If I accepted this relationship you seem to want, you'd come to hate me for making you live a lie.
▪ If you live a lie, what is the next step?
▪ It is toiling to live with a lie.
▪ Now Diana will feel she need no longer go on living a lie trapped in a sham relationship.
▪ He said he would not live with a lie.
▪ All their married life she had been living a lie.
▪ By refraining from questioning I've allowed Liza to go on living a lie.
spread
▪ Let them then spread all these lies.
tell
▪ She did not think Matilda was meaning to tell a lie.
▪ But if there is no punishment, it is perfectly acceptable to tell lies.
▪ In the process, it will inevitably begin to tell itself plausible lies.
▪ Perhaps Lou had told him the monstrous lie that I didn't love him any more?
▪ We can not tell a lie, so we confessed we were getting way too many.
▪ Why hadn't she told a white lie and claimed she had a licence?
▪ Hear me, my friends, for it is not the time for me to tell you a lie.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a tissue of lies
▪ The Springall business was hidden by a tissue of lies.
be a good/quick/easy etc lay
▪ I don't deny it was a good lay.
be/lie at the bottom of sth
▪ His girlfriend had been woken by the noise, and had found him lying at the bottom of the stairs.
▪ Holman lay at the bottom of the open grave where he'd been roughly dumped.
▪ Knowing that self-interest lay at the bottom of his proposal did not prevent my being grateful.
▪ Mind you're not found lying at the bottom of the steps with a broken neck like Amy Robsart.
▪ The female's sperm storage tubules are sausage-shaped and sperm lie at the bottom of the tube.
▪ The rest, including your own clothes, now lie at the bottom of some deep, evil-smelling swamp.
▪ To deliver water from these depths the pumping machine has to be at the bottom of the well.
▪ Your name will be at the bottom of the letter-why write it twice?
be/lie in ruins
▪ Our economy lies in ruins.
▪ Whole blocks of the city were in ruins after the war.
▪ Abingdon's trade had been waning for some time, with its fulling mills lying in ruins and unemployment rife by 1538.
▪ Elizabeth Jarvis said it was like St Paul's Cathedral, miraculously saved while all around it lay in ruins.
▪ He thought the surrounding towns must lie in ruins now, too.
▪ I have said, and I say again, that Trantor will lie in ruins within the next five centuries.
▪ It was to lie in ruins for another sixty-one years.
▪ Large rural areas lay in ruins.
▪ The centrepiece was a gradual revaluation of the lira against the dollar-a strategy which now lies in ruins.
be/lie/sit sprawled (out)
▪ He was lying sprawled across the pillow leaning on his elbow, his head propped to one side, reading the letter.
▪ His rear gunner lay sprawled dead in the back.
▪ The next thing she knew, she was lying sprawled across the pavement.
▪ The observer lay sprawled across his gun, his blond hair streaming romantically in the wind.
▪ We may see a road accident but we shall never be sprawled out on the tarmacadam like that.
lay a hand/finger on sb
▪ He wouldn't dare lay a finger on any of us.
▪ I laid a hand on his hair.
▪ I lay a hand on his chest and felt him breathe, mile after mile through the Kentucky night.
▪ If she laid a hand on him, what could he do besides run for it?
▪ Some one laid a hand on me.
▪ Stuyvesant responded by laying hands on To bias Feake, who delivered the document, arresting and eventually banishing him.
▪ The odds are that the young man would not have laid a finger on her, but what if ...?
lay bricks/carpet/concrete/cables etc
▪ Compact the base, then lay concrete, using a 1 cement to 5 parts ballast mix.
▪ During the week I found work in town painting houses, laying carpets and delivering telephone books.
▪ Trying to raise efficiency and morale without first setting this structure to rights is like trying to lay bricks without mortar.
▪ Why didn't he lay concrete you ask?
lay claim to (doing) sth
▪ Dole himself did not expect to lay claim to the title of presumptive nominee until after the March 26 primary in California.
▪ I'd guess it also can lay claim to the oldest leader of a still-functioning organisation today.
▪ Initially these had been one hundred and seventy-five men and twenty-five horses laying claim to an empire of fourteen million.
▪ They seem to lay claim to being purely of the mind's eye, a manifestation of pure objectivity.
▪ This latter idea could lay claim to a basis in ideas of collegiality - but only of a limited nature.
▪ With his victory in Florida officially certified, Bush announced new moves to lay claim to the White House.
lay down the law
▪ If Bob starts laying down the law, just tell him to shut up.
▪ Parents need to lay down the law regarding how much TV their children watch.
▪ By eleven o'clock I was standing in front of Patterson's desk laying down the law.
▪ It is unfortunate that Mrs Gardner's thoroughness did not extend to laying down the law about insurance.
▪ MacFarland said I would do well in his class and laid down the law about doing well in the others.
▪ Ron, too, was laying down the law.
▪ She would lay down the laws.
▪ Steadily I disappointed Paquita, who believed it was my job to lay down the law with Clarisa.
▪ They made a move for the piano, but we laid down the law and soon redirected their energy to sightseeing.
▪ Well, there was nothing for it, I had to lay down the law in no uncertain terms.
lay down your life
▪ He considered it a privilege to lay down his life for his country.
▪ He remembered the words of Izz Huett: She would have laid down her life for you.
▪ I would lay down my life for it.
▪ They had true grievances to settle and were ready to lay down their lives for vengeance.
lay emphasis/stress on sth
▪ In addition to the need for humility, discipline and singleminded devotion in the quest for Truth Gandhi lays stress on prayer.
▪ In the matter of ultimate aesthetic evaluation it laid stress on the intuitive response of the general public.
▪ She said that her interview had laid stress on personal circumstances rather than experience and qualifications.
lay it on (thick)
▪ He laid it on top of one of the garbage cans lined up in front of his building.
▪ I laid it on soil; the shoulders managed a few slow twitches, pulled it an inch forward.
▪ I laid it on the line.
▪ I took a card out and laid it on the counter.
▪ She laid it on the floor of the car.
▪ She took her coat off and laid it on the bed.
▪ Tenderly she laid it on the bed.
▪ That way, unless I've really laid it on thick, I can get along at a cracking pace.
lay it on with a trowel
lay off (sb)
▪ An estimated 3 million workers have been laid off be-tween 1989 and 1995 as corporate profits have soared.
▪ He and Dean had just been laid off during a seniority lapse because of a drastic reduction of crews.
▪ He must lay off the kif.
▪ The sort of business which flourished in the eighties but suffered in the recession hit nineties, laying off workers.
▪ The station has laid off one-third of its staff.
▪ Three years later, it reported its worst quarterly loss ever and laid off 16 percent of its work force.
▪ We must lay off the booze even during Holy Communion.
▪ We sought out people who had been laid off from large corporations and were forced to create new lives.
lay off (sth)
▪ An estimated 3 million workers have been laid off be-tween 1989 and 1995 as corporate profits have soared.
▪ He and Dean had just been laid off during a seniority lapse because of a drastic reduction of crews.
▪ He must lay off the kif.
▪ The sort of business which flourished in the eighties but suffered in the recession hit nineties, laying off workers.
▪ The station has laid off one-third of its staff.
▪ Three years later, it reported its worst quarterly loss ever and laid off 16 percent of its work force.
▪ We must lay off the booze even during Holy Communion.
▪ We sought out people who had been laid off from large corporations and were forced to create new lives.
lay plans/a trap etc
▪ And the speaker may be totally unaware of laying a trap.
▪ Clare wouldn't put it past Sam to use a rat to lay a trap for her.
lay sb low
▪ The infection laid her low for a month.
lay sb to rest
▪ She was laid to rest next to her husband, who died in 1993.
▪ At nightfall she was tired and lay down to rest.
▪ Rather it attempted to lay the movement to rest.
▪ She took the pills and lay down to rest with her eyes closed.
▪ Then she lay down to rest in the lounge, surrounded by other women who even here never stopped talking.
▪ We can't even lay him to rest.
▪ Without proof I should really lay the idea to rest.
lay sb ↔ off
lay sb/sth on the line
▪ And Moonshake lay theirs on the line. right now; today, not yesterday.
▪ I laid it on the line.
▪ I couldn't blame her; she'd laid things on the line from the start, as I had.
▪ You give somebody else a chance, and guys lay it on the line for you.
lay sb/sth open to sth
▪ And he has laid himself wide open to the kind of criticism that will cloak him in a dark shroud of misery.
▪ If he had said he was acting under his own authority, he would have laid himself open to ridicule.
▪ Is it something you should do, or do you lay yourself open to terrible legal proceedings?
▪ It is not difficult to see how this approach lays itself open to abuse and drastic criticism.
▪ It is not only those who dismiss the arts as self-indulgent who lay themselves open to such a charge.
▪ Not to have taken action, she said, would have laid her department open to a charge of negligence.
▪ The Evangelicals have become a powerful influence in the land and this lays them open to the wooing of politicians.
▪ This would amount to a breach of their contract of employment and lay them open to disciplinary proceedings.
lay siege to sb/sth
▪ After his victory Edward rallied his troops and marched north to lay siege to Calais.
▪ Almost ten years had passed since they had first laid siege to the town, and it seemed as strong as ever.
▪ He laid siege to the fortress and gradually weakened it to the point of collapse.
▪ In 476 they laid siege to Eion, which guarded the Strymon bridge.
▪ In June 1176 Richard laid siege to Limoges; after a few days resistance Aimar's citadel capitulated.
▪ In less than two generations, since the Second World War, they have laid siege to the academic world.
▪ She had laid siege to the typists' room for some minutes before Marshall had persuaded her downstairs.
lay siege to sb/sth
▪ After his victory Edward rallied his troops and marched north to lay siege to Calais.
▪ Almost ten years had passed since they had first laid siege to the town, and it seemed as strong as ever.
▪ He laid siege to the fortress and gradually weakened it to the point of collapse.
▪ In 476 they laid siege to Eion, which guarded the Strymon bridge.
▪ In June 1176 Richard laid siege to Limoges; after a few days resistance Aimar's citadel capitulated.
▪ In less than two generations, since the Second World War, they have laid siege to the academic world.
▪ She had laid siege to the typists' room for some minutes before Marshall had persuaded her downstairs.
lay sth at the door of sb/sth
lay sth bare
▪ The depth of the problem is laid bare in the fact that 40% of 18- to 25- year-olds are unemployed.
▪ The excavation laid bare the streets of the ancient city.
lay sth bare/open
▪ Krushchev laid bare Stalin's crimes.
▪ New bricks were removed, laying bare the old foundations.
lay sth on sb
lay sth ↔ off
lay sth ↔ on
lay sth ↔ up
lay the foundations/groundwork/base
▪ Because Save the Children want to lay the foundations for a better future.
▪ He laid the foundations by cutting one percent off interest rates, scrapping special car tax, and boosting the housing industry.
▪ He said he hoped they had laid the foundations for peace - but admitted obstacles could lie ahead.
▪ One of my officials chairs the experts committee that laid the groundwork for this achievement.
▪ Progress in primary schools has laid the foundations for the drive to raise standards in secondary schools, announced last month.
▪ The defense Monday seemed to lay the groundwork for an argument about damages.
▪ Then the elite persuaded the newly elected mayor to appoint a committee to lay the groundwork for redevelopment.
▪ Will took advantage of this opportunity to lay the groundwork for his epitaph.
lay the ghost (of sth)
▪ Max So-you've laid the ghost.
lay waste sth
lay your hands on sth
▪ Government reports, social legislation, anything she could lay her hands on that would better acquaint her with her work.
▪ He will sell anything he can lay his hands on in exchange for drugs, which includes any information he may have.
▪ I know exactly where to lay my hands on them.
▪ I like writing letters and reading anything I can lay my hands on!
▪ Kabari women use whatever birth control technology they can lay their hands on.
▪ Looters carried clothes out of shop windows along with anything else they could lay their hands on.
▪ Monday I felt driven to eat everything I could lay my hands on.
▪ Some one had to overturn the present political arrangements in the Limousin if he was ever to lay his hands on Hautefort.
lay/provide the foundation(s) for sth
▪ Tests on healthy people may lay the foundation for a vaccine to prevent AIDS.
▪ I think you have to lay the foundation for your success in terms of defense and rebounding.
▪ It laid the foundation for an organisation with greater appeal to the deaf themselves, particularly the young.
▪ These arguments provide the foundation for Simmel's account of the contradictory nature of modern life.
▪ This theory also laid the foundation for the modern revolution in our understanding of the deepest parts of the earth.
▪ To generate fundamental knowledge that can lay the foundation for future advances in high-performance computing and communications.
▪ We could say that she is laying the foundations for dressing herself later on.
▪ What is stressed rather is that the same phenomenon provides the foundation for both historical tendencies.
▪ While incomplete, the steps that were taken laid the foundation for Workplace 2000.
lay/put sth to rest
▪ Many of the public's doubts have now been laid to rest.
▪ A second glance put my mind to rest, but for a moment there it gave me a turn.
▪ I think this definitely puts it to rest.
▪ Kwasniewski has said he may dissolve parliament to put the issue to rest and call for new elections.
▪ Rather it attempted to lay the movement to rest.
▪ She took the pills and lay down to rest with her eyes closed.
▪ The time has come to put this to rest.
▪ Then she lay down to rest in the lounge, surrounded by other women who even here never stopped talking.
▪ Without proof I should really lay the idea to rest.
let sleeping dogs lie
▪ The best plan is just to let sleeping dogs lie.
let sth drop/rest/lie
lie back and think of England
lie in state
▪ He lay in state, for ever disgraced.
▪ He lay on the marble slab in the centre of the tiny oblong chapel like a king lying in state.
▪ He may as well have been lying in state.
▪ Jane was fearful for a moment that Flopsy might be lying in state.
▪ President to lie in state while he was still alive.
live a lie
▪ Betts said he announced his homosexuality because he couldn't go on living a lie.
▪ I had to leave him - I couldn't go on living a lie.
▪ A few miles from the house where Irina and I live lies an old churchyard.
▪ All their married life she had been living a lie.
▪ But she was living a lie wasn't she?
▪ By refraining from questioning I've allowed Liza to go on living a lie.
▪ If I accepted this relationship you seem to want, you'd come to hate me for making you live a lie.
▪ If you live a lie, what is the next step?
▪ Now Diana will feel she need no longer go on living a lie trapped in a sham relationship.
nail a lie/myth
pack of lies
▪ It's a pack of lies.
▪ It could all have been a pack of lies that Uncle Max cooked up because it gave him such power over Tawno.
▪ Nicholas frankly admitted that for the most part the reports were a pack of lies.
▪ Or was it all a pack of lies to make me give in?
patent lie/nonsense/impossibility etc
put/lay your cards on the table
▪ If they're willing to put all their cards on the table and negotiate, that's good.
▪ If we want to reach an agreement, we'll have to lay all our cards on the table.
▪ They're willing to put all their cards on the table and negotiate.
▪ Come on, you can lay your cards on the table in this house.
▪ The new rules appear to encourage parties to lay their cards on the table and facilitate early settlements.
put/lay/set down a marker
see/find out how the land lies
set/lay/clap eyes on sb/sth
▪ Bedford disliked Halsey the minute he set eyes on him.
▪ How could she possibly know, since he had not set eyes on the girl?
▪ I bonded on the second night I laid eyes on Hyakutake.
▪ Just hours earlier she had set eyes on the pretty two-year-old and sister Anna-Camilla, seven, for the first time.
▪ Never anywhere have I set eyes on such a one.
▪ No sooner did she set eyes on the gentleman than she recognised his pecuniary position to be merely temporary.
▪ The couple fell in love before they had even set eyes on each other during a six-month long distance courtship.
sit/lie/lean back
▪ Craig sighed and leaned back in his chair.
▪ But no one can sit back in investment clubs and just listen.
▪ He must generate all his own internal discipline against the possible inclination to lie back and enjoy his good fortune.
▪ He sat back on his heels, sorrowfully examining the ruined glove.
▪ He walked without hesitation to the very front row, sat down and lay back, gazing up at the screen.
▪ She heard him returning just as she sat back to admire her handiwork.
▪ Then she lay back on her pillow and they looked at each other as if it was for the first time.
▪ We started to sit back because we were up on the No. 1 team in the nation.
▪ Whatever some think, we don't sit back.
the lay of sth
▪ A lot of people, especially those new to the city, have no concept of the lay of the land.
▪ Failure to recognise slopes until committed to landing Make a point of looking for the lay of the surrounding countryside.
▪ It was therefore an important moment when Tolkien gave Lewis the Lay of Leithian to read in manuscript.
the lay of the land
▪ He's got to get the lay of the land before he makes any decisions.
▪ A lot of people, especially those new to the city, have no concept of the lay of the land.
therein lies sth
▪ The treaty was imposed by force, and therein lay the cause of its ineffectiveness.
time hangs/lies heavy on your hands
you've made your bed and you must lie on it
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Davenport said the congressman's allegations were nothing more than "downright lies".
▪ He called the report "a pack of lies".
▪ How can the newspapers print all these lies about her?
▪ Jim said that he was planning to stay home and watch TV, but I knew it was a lie.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And yet parents press children to be truthful, admonishing against wild stories and silly lies.
▪ But she was afraid that some evil tongue might poison me with lies ....
▪ Jean Cocteau said that history is facts which become lies and that legends are lies which become history.
▪ Otherwise, it would sound like some kind of weird, fawning lie.
▪ That would be a bit of a lie.
Wikipedia

Lie

A lie is a statement that the stating party believes to be false and that is made with the intention to deceive. The practice of communicating lies is called lying, and a person who communicates a lie may be termed a liar. Lies may be employed to serve a variety of instrumental, interpersonal, or psychological functions for the individuals who use them. Generally, the term "lie" carries a negative connotation, and depending on the context a person who communicates a lie may be subject to social, legal, religious, or criminal sanctions. In certain situations, however, lying is permitted, expected, or even encouraged. Believing and acting on false information can have serious consequences. Therefore, scientists and others have attempted to develop reliable methods for distinguishing lies from true statements.

Lie (song)

"Lie" is the first single by Black Light Burns from their debut album Cruel Melody. It was released to radio on March 20.

Lie (T-ara song)

"Geojitmal" (, "Lie") is the debut single by South Korean girl group T-ara released on July 27, 2009. All the tracks, excluding "Lie (Part.2)", from the single were later included on the group's debut album, Absolute First Album. The first version was re-titled as "Lie (Dance Ver.)" and the second part "Lie (Slow Ver.)".

Lie (disambiguation)

A lie is a type of deception, an untruth or not telling the truth.

Lie or LIE may also refer to:

  • Lie (surname)
  • Lie (Dream Theater single)
  • Lie (song), a song by Black Light Burns
  • Lie: The Love and Terror Cult, an album by Charles Manson
  • Saint Lie
  • Interstate 495 (New York), also called the Long Island Expressway
    • L.I.E., a film revolving around the Long Island Expressway
  • Law of iterated expectations or law of total expectation, a probability, statistical concept
  • Lying (position), the recumbent position of the human body
  • Liechtenstein, IOC country code
  • In socionics, a Logical Intuitive Extrovert
  • Lie (obstetrics), an obstetrical term for the axis of the foetus

In mathematics (named after Sophus Lie):

  • Lie algebra
  • Lie bracket of vector fields
  • Lie derivative
  • Lie group
    • Group of Lie type
  • Lie sphere geometry
  • Lie theory
  • Carathéodory-Jacobi-Lie theorem

Lie (surname)

As a surname, Lie may refer to

  • A Norwegian surnameLie, which may refer to:
    • Anders Danielsen Lie, Norwegian actor
    • Jonas Lie (writer), Norwegian novelist
    • Jonas Lie (painter), Norwegian-American painter
    • Sophus Lie, Norwegian mathematician
    • Trygve Lie, Norwegian politician, first Secretary-General of the United Nations
    • Haakon Lie, Norwegian politician
    • Kaare Lie ( no), Norwegian footballer and journalist
  • The common Chinese surname Li , spelled Lie in Indonesia and Netherlands:
    • Lie Kim Hok, peranakan Chinese writer, social worker
Wiktionary

lie

Etymology 1 n. 1 (context golf English) The terrain and conditions surrounding the ball before it is struck. 2 (context medicine English) The position of a fetus in the womb. vb. (label en intransitive) To rest in a horizontal position on a surface. Etymology 2

vb. 1 (context intransitive English) To give false information intentionally. 2 (context intransitive English) To convey a false image or impression. Etymology 3

n. 1 An intentionally false statement; an intentional falsehood. 2 A statement intended to deceive, even if literally true; a half-truth 3 Anything that misleads or disappoints.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

lie

Lye \Lye\, n. [Written also lie and ley.] [AS. le['a]h; akin to D. loog, OHG. louga, G. lauge; cf. Icel. laug a bath, a hot spring.]

  1. A strong caustic alkaline solution of potassium salts, obtained by leaching wood ashes. It is much used in making soap, etc.

  2. (Chem.) Sodium hydroxide or potassium hydroxide, or a concentrated aqueous solution of either compound.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

lie

"speak falsely, tell an untruth," late 12c., from Old English legan, ligan, earlier leogan "deceive, belie, betray" (class II strong verb; past tense leag, past participle logen), from Proto-Germanic *leugan (cognates: Old Norse ljuga, Danish lyve, Old Frisian liaga, Old Saxon and Old High German liogan, German lügen, Gothic liugan), from PIE root *leugh- "to tell a lie."

lie

"rest horizontally," early 12c., from Old English licgan (class V strong verb; past tense læg, past participle legen) "be situated, reamin; be at rest, lie down," from Proto-Germanic *legjan (cognates: Old Norse liggja, Old Frisian lidzia, Middle Dutch ligghen, Dutch liggen, Old High German ligen, German liegen, Gothic ligan), from PIE *legh- "to lie, lay" (cognates: Hittite laggari "falls, lies," Greek lekhesthai "to lie down," Latin lectus "bed," Old Church Slavonic lego "to lie down," Lithuanian at-lagai "fallow land," Old Irish laigim "I lie down," Irish luighe "couch, grave"). To lie with "have sexual intercourse" is from c.1300, and compare Old English licgan mid "cohabit with." To take (something) lying down "passively, submissively" is from 1854.

lie

"an untruth," Old English lyge "lie, falsehood," from Proto-Germanic *lugiz (cognates: Old Norse lygi, Danish løgn, Old Frisian leyne (fem.), Dutch leugen (fem.), Old High German lugi, German Lüge, Gothic liugn "a lie"), from the root of lie (v.1). To give the lie to "accuse directly of lying" is attested from 1590s. Lie-detector first recorded 1909.

lie

"manner of lying," 1690s, from lie (v.2). Sense in golf is from 1857.

WordNet

lie

  1. n. a statement that deviates from or perverts the truth [syn: prevarication]

  2. Norwegian diplomat who was the first Secretary General of the United Nations (1896-1968) [syn: Trygve Lie, Trygve Halvden Lie]

  3. position or manner in which something is situated

  4. [also: lying, lay, lain]

lie

  1. v. be located or situated somewhere; occupy a certain position

  2. be lying, be prostrate; be in a horizontal position; "The sick man lay in bed all day"; "the books are lying on the shelf" [ant: stand, sit]

  3. originate (in); "The problems dwell in the social injustices in this country" [syn: dwell, consist, belong, lie in]

  4. be and remain in a particular state or condition; "lie dormant"

  5. tell an untruth; pretend with intent to deceive; "Don't lie to your parents"; "She lied when she told me she was only 29"

  6. have a place in relation to something else; "The fate of Bosnia lies in the hands of the West"; "The responsibility rests with the Allies" [syn: rest]

  7. assume a reclining position; "lie down on the bed until you feel better" [syn: lie down] [ant: arise]

  8. [also: lying, lay, lain]

Gazetteer

Usage examples of "lie".

He saw that the epicentre of Aberrancy always lay at the site of a Weaver monastery, and the monasteries were always built around the witchstones.

For the mind and the passion of Hitler - all the aberrations that possessed his feverish brain - had roots that lay deep in German experience and thought.

Our bargain was for three nights, and for three nights I lay with him, for I do not abjure my promise.

She whirled, her right hand raised, but before she could use the controlling ring she lay sprawled on the floor, one side of her face ablaze from the blow of a phantom hand.

Kingsley looked out over the flower beds that, still abloom in spite of the lateness of the season, lay before Aylesberg Hall.

In many of his contemporaries also much the same fluctuation of mood was occurring, and to them as to Paul it seemed that the issue lay between the old faith, however modernized, and the complete abnegation of human dignity.

Harry, is that if the orders were lying about for all to see, with sailors being the gossips they are then the men aboard any ship in the harbour would soon be appraised of their contents.

To her all the wreckage of the slums, all the woe lying beneath gilded life, all the abominations, all the tortures that remain unknown, were carried.

But no human being loved the aborigines more, nor stood ready to lay down her life for them if it were necessary.

Between the two lies the main ship channel, varying in width from seven hundred and fifty yards, three miles outside, to two thousand, or about a sea mile, abreast Fort Morgan.

He always knew if someone was absent, but the rule of thumb was that unless he was asked a direct question he would not volunteer this information and therefore would not have to lie or turn the absentee in.

You got yourself down that mountain and you left Moon on her own, the way you left Aby lying there for the spooks!

The Abies girl was lying there dead and stinking and his face got tight, then he made a little fist as though he was going to yell.

Bartleby, lies about a century of early America, consolidating itself as a Christian capitalist state, even as acedia was in the last stages of its shift over from a spiritual to a secular condition.

Fernbrake Lake, one of the four magical lakes in Achar, lay deep in the Bracken Ranges far to the south of the Avarinheim, and the Avar people had to travel secretly through the hostile Skarabost Plains to reach the lake they called the Mother.