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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
lend
verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a bank lends sth
▪ The bank lent me £10,000 to help me start the business.
a lending library (=one that lends books)
▪ Lending libraries became increasingly popular in Victorian times.
give/lend/offer etc sb a helping hand
▪ She’s been giving me a helping hand with the children.
lend credence to sth (=to make something more believable)
▪ The DNA results lend credence to Hausmann’s claims of innocence.
lend credibility to sb/sth (=make something or someone have more credibility)
▪ The evidence lent credibility to their arguments.
lend sb money
▪ My dad lent me money to buy a car.
lending library
lending rate
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
to
▪ They can lend to and buy from other banks.
■ NOUN
air
▪ This, in traditional form, is a treacly brown colour and lends a definite antique air to what you are polishing.
▪ Mire Secondly, Pache's style does not lend any air of the dynamism needed to steer Bull out of its current mire.
▪ Or does the environment lend itself to the air power and precision-guided missiles of a Steve Forbes?
▪ The large headstock, with its shallow pitch, looks quite in keeping and the mini-Schaller machineheads help lend an up-market air.
▪ And his extrajudicial comments disparaging Microsoft and its officers lent an air of bias to his action against the company.
bank
▪ There was, however, a swing from bonds and bank lending to equity-related bonds.
▪ He urged the bank executives to keep lending to investment firms and other businesses.
▪ The lending bank lends funds and in return accepts the bankers acceptance.
▪ He said the bank hoped to increase lending again this year.
▪ The basic bank lending rate was set at 36 percent per month.
▪ Last December the Federal Reserve adjusted its reserve requirements on time deposits to encourage banks to lend more.
credence
▪ The absence of military protection for the abolitionists in Alton lends credence to legal indifference that bound the country at this time.
▪ It lends credence to the kinds of beliefs and fears that make victims of all who hold them.
▪ These debates lend credence to the view that the southern states would not have ratified the Constitution without the proslavery compromises.
credibility
▪ Jim slipped on his overcoat and grabbed his briefcase as well as his large portfolio case to lend credibility to his story.
ear
▪ Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears.
▪ He finds time for them, always being prepared to lend a sympathetic ear or give some friendly confidential advice.
firm
▪ Though banks lend huge sums to firms, banks are not the only source of lending.
▪ Suppose a bank agrees to lend to a firm upon demand up to a certain amount.
▪ He urged the bank executives to keep lending to investment firms and other businesses.
funds
▪ Banks borrow and lend wholesale funds amongst themselves, dealing through money brokers, for periods ranging from overnight to five years.
▪ The lending bank lends funds and in return accepts the bankers acceptance.
hand
▪ I just thought I'd come up and lend a hand.
▪ He may have lent a hand in the construction of the Jefferys pocket watch and even of H-4.
▪ It was a well attended meeting, thanks to all who lent a hand.
▪ Women came by from other camps to lend a hand, bringing prashad.
▪ If a comrade paused to lend a hand, it often meant that two would drown instead of one.
▪ Nick and I laid out tow ropes to the bow of the raft, and cajoled bystanders to lend a hand.
▪ Plenty of food makes it better to bear daughters who can lend a hand.
▪ Joe lent a hand to all, and supplied much of the muscle.
helping
▪ Britain's champion in the sport has been lending a helping hand.
▪ Petion, follow them and lend a helping hand.
house
▪ For example, the rules restricted societies to lending for house purchase.
▪ The retail-finance industry changed in many ways as a result - but most of all in lending for house purchase.
▪ I have friends who lend me a house there every summer for a few weeks, if I want it.
▪ The most obvious effect was to constrain societies to their traditional role of lending for house purchase.
money
▪ Markets-where money is lent and borrowed, and paper assets are bought and sold.
▪ The seven companies expect to lose nearly half the money they lent after selling collateral held on the nonperforming debt.
▪ Much of this money is lent on an overnight basis.
▪ If rates rise, investors can get rid of the bonds and use their money to lend at higher rates.
▪ They will have very much more money available to lend than either the Co-op Bank or Girobank.
▪ Subsequently, money was lent interest-free by Mr Fynn to the trust.
mortgage
▪ As a consequence direct mortgage lending to owner occupiers increased sharply.
▪ Woolwich is engaged primarily in mortgage lending and deposit taking and has 550, 000 borrowers.
▪ Net mortgage lending by building societies dropped 15 percent to Pounds 1.85 billion last month.
▪ That disparity was due to the high level of mortgage lending at Bankinter.
name
▪ Can he lend his name to the petition without compromising his professional integrity?
▪ Is he actually involved, or just lending his name to it?
▪ But a more calculating side is emerging, where celebrities are almost being blackmailed into lending their names to causes.
rate
▪ Dall was effectively trading money; he sought to borrow each day at the cheapest rates and lend at the highest.
sum
▪ They got engaged after he proposed and she lent him large sums of money.
▪ Though banks lend huge sums to firms, banks are not the only source of lending.
▪ Over the next few years, Mrs J was pressured into lending her son large sums of money.
▪ Generally, banks are not eager to lend huge sums to lottery winners based on the winnings alone.
▪ He lent considerable sums to the crown, perhaps as much as £50,000 between 1373 and 1376.
support
▪ Some psychoanalytic writing appears to lend support to these assumptions.
▪ Mayor Brown has lent his support to the bill, writing a letter to Sen.
▪ Lind makes no apparent use of this book, perhaps because it lends so little support to his view of the war.
▪ We see this as a national event of great importance and we are lending it our full support.
▪ The historical case studies carried out by Lakatos and his followers certainly lend some support to that latter claim.
▪ In these circumstances it was the business of responsible churchmen to lend support to the monarch in every way they could.
▪ He promised to lend no more support to his half-brothers in Angoulême.
weight
▪ I lent weight to his side of the story but they sent him down.
▪ The bishops insisted that the Capitol Hill prayer vigil was non-partisan, but the impending election lent the event political weight.
▪ A woman of such forthright views as yourself would, I feel, lend considerable weight to this project.
▪ I owe it to Victoria to lend some retrospective weight to our parting.
▪ It's the first time a leading drinks company has lent its weight to such a campaign.
▪ The law lends its weight to uphold and enforce contracts freely entered into.
▪ Not withstanding the need for more investigation, the evidence surveyed in the previous chapter certainly lends weight to this view.
▪ Recognising this paradox lends weight to the patriarchy thesis, explaining away many apparent counter-examples.
■ VERB
agree
▪ He agreed to lend the Lysander in exchange for two cases of Scotch whisky.
▪ Suppose a bank agrees to lend to a firm upon demand up to a certain amount.
▪ Accordingly, I wrote to Eliot asking whether he would agree to lend us his assistance and his authority in this way.
borrow
▪ Banks borrow and lend wholesale funds amongst themselves, dealing through money brokers, for periods ranging from overnight to five years.
▪ But he was borrowing and lending for only that one day.
▪ However, when the risk-free asset is introduced to this situation investors will all either borrow or lend at the risk-free rate.
▪ Each economic unit borrows and lends at the same time because individual transactions are undertaken for different reasons.
▪ In reality, individuals may not be able to borrow and lend freely at a given interest rate.
▪ The implicit assumption is that investors can borrow and lend at the riskless rate of interest.
offer
▪ Daniel had been offering to lend her his favourite book of poetry as she had developed a liking for it.
prepare
▪ Few financial institutions are prepared to lend to proprietors and partnerships on this basis.
▪ He finds time for them, always being prepared to lend a sympathetic ear or give some friendly confidential advice.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
lend/give colour to sth
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Can you lend me $20?
▪ Did you lend that book to Mike?
▪ I lent my penknife to someone, but I can't remember who it was now.
▪ I wish I'd never lent him my car.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Banks would lend money more freely and, in fattening their own balance sheets, would feed credit-starved economies.
▪ Eddie lent it back to me.
▪ That disparity was due to the high level of mortgage lending at Bankinter.
▪ The next chapter reviews actual bank lending techniques and practices.
▪ They have proved beneficial for plants partly because of their cotton fibre content, which lends moisture.
▪ They will be eager to lend to you.
▪ To carry emotional moments, Miller pumps up the treacly soundtrack, lending it the importance of a main character.
▪ Tom Robb, a teacher of over 30 years, can lend advice on may technical problems.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Lend

Lend \Lend\ (l[e^]nd), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Lent (l[e^]nt); p. pr. & vb. n. Lending.] [OE. lenen, AS. l[=ae]nan, fr. l[=ae]n loan; akin to G. lehnen to lend. See Loan.]

  1. To allow the custody and use of, on condition of the return of the same; to grant the temporary use of; as, to lend a book; -- opposed to borrow.

    Give me that ring. I'll lend it thee, my dear, but have no power To give it from me.
    --Shak.

  2. To allow the possession and use of, on condition of the return of an equivalent in kind; as, to lend money or some article of food.

    Thou shalt not give him thy money upon usury, nor lend him thy victuals for increase.
    --Levit. xxv. 37.

  3. To afford; to grant or furnish in general; as, to lend assistance; to lend one's name or influence.

    Cato, lend me for a while thy patience.
    --Addison.

    Mountain lines and distant horizons lend space and largeness to his compositions.
    --J. A. Symonds.

  4. To let for hire or compensation; as, to lend a horse or gig.

    Note: This use of the word is rare in the United States, except with reference to money.

    To lend a hand, to give assistance; to help. [Colloq.]

    To lend one's ears or To lend an ear, to give attention.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
lend

late 14c., from Old English lænan "to lend," from læn "loan" (see loan). Cognate with Dutch lenen, Old High German lehanon, German lehnen, also verbs derived from nouns. Past tense form, with terminal -d, became the principal form in Middle English on analogy of bend, send, etc.

Wiktionary
lend

Etymology 1 alt. 1 (context anatomy UK dialectal English) The lumbar region; loin. 2 (context UK dialectal of a person or animal English) The loins; flank; buttocks. n. 1 (context anatomy UK dialectal English) The lumbar region; loin. 2 (context UK dialectal of a person or animal English) The loins; flank; buttocks. Etymology 2

vb. (context transitive English) To allow to be used by someone temporarily, on condition that it or its equivalent will be #Verbed.

WordNet
lend
  1. v. bestow a quality on; "Her presence lends a certain cachet to the company"; "The music added a lot to the play"; "She brings a special atmosphere to our meetings"; "This adds a light note to the program" [syn: impart, bestow, contribute, add, bring]

  2. give temporarily; let have for a limited time; "I will lend you my car"; "loan me some money" [syn: loan] [ant: borrow]

  3. have certain characteristics of qualities for something; be open or vulnerable to; "This story would lend itself well to serialization on television"; "The current system lends itself to great abuse"

  4. [also: lent]

Wikipedia
Lend

Lend may refer to:

  • Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector, see Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter
  • Lend, Austria, a town in the district of Zell am See in the state of Salzburg
  • Lend (Graz), a district of Graz
  • Lend, Iran, a village in Mazandaran Province, Iran
Lend (Graz)

Lend is the 4th district of the Austrian city of Graz. It is located on the west bank of the Mur and north of the district Gries and west of the district Innere Stadt and the Schloßberg.

It has a population of 28,249 (in 2011) and covers an area of 3.7 square kilometres. The postal codes of Lend are 8020 and 8051.

Usage examples of "lend".

Bal had lent Barrie to us, and without a woman to aid and abet him, it seemed to me that he was powerless.

James abetted him in saying that fifty pounds was not a penny too much to lend on such a treasure.

They lent acrimony to the impending canvass and increased the mutual hostility of those engaged in the exciting controversy.

His dark brown eyes, narrow brows and sharp, angular features lent him a stern countenance that stood in stark contrast to his untroubled, affable nature.

He must lend himself to the development of aggregatory ideas that favour the civilising process, and he must do his best to promote the disintegration of aggregations and the effacement of aggregatory ideas, that keep men narrow and unreasonably prejudiced one against another.

Marco de Alvarado said, giving her name the uniquely intimate intonation he had always lent to it.

The bargain basement ambience of the office lent credibility to the spiel.

As difficult as it proved to be, she sought to lend her attention to what she was actually seeing rather than the warmly titillating ambience through which she had just drifted.

If you find pansies growing wild, you can count on axolotls being there-abouts, ready to lend a man a hand.

Somewhere along the way, Bailor had connected with art criminals and had perhaps lent his break-in talent to their undertakings.

Line after line, and rank after rank, they choked the neck of the valley with a long vista of tossing pennons, twinkling lances, waving plumes and streaming banderoles, while the curvets and gambades of the chargers lent a constant motion and shimmer to the glittering, many-colored mass.

Almighty enable you to lend a fresh and unprecedented impetus to the onward march of the Faith, revive the spirit of its supporters, enlarge its limits, multiply its local institutions, consolidate its foundations, safeguard its rights, spread abroad its fame, and aid its followers to discharge befittingly their responsibilities, and concentrate on the attainment of the objectives of the Ten-Year Plan, on which the immediate destiny of the entire community depends.

I brought with me eight thousand livres in fair sequins, and knowing that in this happy commonwealth all men enjoyed the blessings of liberty, I believed that by utilizing my capital I might make a little income, and I began to lend money, on security.

The worthy man, feeling how natural was my repugnance, begged me to forgive him for having summoned me to him, and, considering it his duty to send me back to Venice, having no money himself and not being aware that I had any, he told me that he would give me an introduction to a worthy citizen of Naples who would lend me sixty ducati-di-regno to enable me to reach my native city.

I was enjoying the effect this bold stroke had made on the company, when young Fox came in and with a roar of laughter begged me to lend him fifty Louis.