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Leftism (album)

Leftism is the first studio album by electronica musicians Paul Daley and Neil Barnes under the name Leftfield. The album was released in 1995 on Columbia Records. Leftism consisted mostly of reworked versions of previous singles by Leftfield and new original pieces. The album contains guest spots from musicians not associated with dance music at the time such as John Lydon from Public Image Ltd. (and formerly of Sex Pistols) and Toni Halliday from Curve. The album was described as progressive house, although some journalists found that label too limiting, suggesting the album incorporated many genres. After completing the album, the duo in Leftfield initially were not happy with it.

On its release, the album was well received from the British press with positive reviews from the NME and Q. The album was nominated for the Mercury Prize in 1995 but lost to Portishead. Leftism sold well and was released months later in the United States. Critics have praised the album as one of the major album-length works of dance music, with Q referring to it as "the first truly complete album experience to be created by house musicians and the first quintessentially British one".

WordNet

leftism

n. the ideology of the political left; belief in or support of the tenets of the political left

Wiktionary

leftism

n. Belief in the principles of left-wing politics.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

leftism

1917, from left in the political sense + -ism.

Usage examples of "leftism".

Given the stagnation of the Empire the military middle class must have decayed in any case, but the spread of a shallow Leftism hastened the process.

They are sealing it off so that students from this notorious hotbed of leftism will not join the march, that is all.

Psychologically, the more doctrinaire forms of leftism played to the notion that the Japanese people as a whole did indeed have to be guided by their superiors to achieve a democratic revolution.

The leftism that so angers these students includes the trendy hey-hey-ho-ho-Western-civ-has-got-to-go theories that inform college courses from coast to coast.

Indeed, as the twentieth century approached its end --an event that would almost exactly coincide with my seventieth birthday--I had the impression, as a longtime warrior against the political leftism I embraced in my thirties and the liberationism in which it expressed itself culturally, and as a more recent soldier in the fight against the anti-Americanism of the Right, that some kind of peace was at hand.