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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
leer
verb
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ "Hey, baby. Do you like what you see?" he said, leering.
▪ My boss was a disgusting man who used to leer at me whenever he passed by my desk.
▪ Stopping his work for a second, the garage attendant leered at the girls in the car.
▪ The man with the gold tooth leered and slapped his hand on her knee.
▪ The old man leered suggestively at the waitress.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Leer

Leer \Leer\, a. [OE. lere; akin to G. leer, OHG. & OS. l[=a]ri.] Empty; destitute; wanting; as:

  1. Empty of contents. ``A leer stomach.''
    --Gifford.

  2. Destitute of a rider; and hence, led, not ridden; as, a leer horse.
    --B. Jonson.

  3. Wanting sense or seriousness; trifling; trivolous; as, leer words.

Leer

Leer \Leer\ (l[=e]r), v. t. To learn. [Obs.] See Lere, to learn.

Leer

Leer \Leer\, v. t. To entice with a leer, or leers; as, to leer a man to ruin.
--Dryden.

Leer

Leer \Leer\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Leered (l[=e]rd); p. pr. & vb. n. Leering.] To look with a leer; to look askance with a suggestive expression, as of hatred, contempt, lust, etc.; to cast a sidelong lustful or malign look.

I will leerupon him as a' comes by.
--Shak.

The priest, above his book, Leering at his neighbor's wife.
--Tennyson.

Leer

Leer \Leer\, n. [OE. lere cheek, face, look, AS. hle['o]r cheek, face; akin to OS. hlear, hlior, OD. lier, Icel. hl[=y]r.]

  1. The cheek. [Obs.]
    --Holinshed.

  2. Complexion; aspect; appearance. [Obs.]

    A Rosalind of a better leer than you.
    --Shak.

  3. A distorted expression of the face, or an indirect glance of the eye, conveying a sinister or immodest suggestion.

    With jealous leer malign Eyed them askance.
    --Milton.

    She gives the leer of invitation.
    --Shak.

    Damn with faint praise, assent with civil leer.
    --Pope.

Leer

Leer \Leer\, n. An oven in which glassware is annealed.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
leer

"to look obliquely" (now usually implying "with a lustful or malicious intent"), 1520s, probably from Middle English noun ler "cheek," from Old English hleor "the cheek, the face," from Proto-Germanic *khleuzas "near the ear," from *kleuso- "ear," from PIE root *kleu- "to hear" (see listen). The notion is probably of "looking askance" (compare figurative development of cheek). Related: Leered; leering.

leer

1590s, from leer (v).

Wiktionary
leer

Etymology 1 n. 1 A significant side glance; a glance expressive of some passion, as malignity, amorousness, etc.; a sly or lecherous look. 2 An arch or affected glance or cast of countenance. vb. 1 (context intransitive English) To look sideways or obliquely; now especially with sexual desire or malicious intent. 2 (context transitive English) To entice with a leer or leers. Etymology 2

alt. 1 (context obsolete English) The cheek. 2 (context obsolete English) The face. 3 (context obsolete English) One's appearance; countenance. 4 (context obsolete English) complexion; hue; blee; colour. 5 (context obsolete English) flesh; skin. 6 (context UK dialectal English) The flank or loin. n. 1 (context obsolete English) The cheek. 2 (context obsolete English) The face. 3 (context obsolete English) One's appearance; countenance. 4 (context obsolete English) complexion; hue; blee; colour. 5 (context obsolete English) flesh; skin. 6 (context UK dialectal English) The flank or loin. Etymology 3

  1. 1 empty; unoccupied; clear. 2 destitute; lacking; wanting. 3 Faint from lack of food; hungry. 4 (context UK dialectal English) thin; faint. 5 Having no load or burden; free; without a rider. 6 Lacking sense or seriousness; trifling; frivolous. alt. 1 empty; unoccupied; clear. 2 destitute; lacking; wanting. 3 Faint from lack of food; hungry. 4 (context UK dialectal English) thin; faint. 5 Having no load or burden; free; without a rider. 6 Lacking sense or seriousness; trifling; frivolous. Etymology 4

    v

  2. 1 (context transitive English) To teach. 2 (context transitive English) To learn. Etymology 5

    n. (alternative form of lehr English)

WordNet
leer
  1. n. a facial expression of contempt or scorn; the upper lip curls [syn: sneer]

  2. a suggestive or sneering look or grin

  3. v. look suggestively or obliquely; look or gaze with a sly, immodest, or malign expression; "The men leered at the young women on the beach"

Wikipedia
Leer (district)

Leer is a district (Landkreis) in Lower Saxony, Germany. It is bounded by (from the northwest and clockwise) the city of Emden, the districts of Aurich, Wittmund, Friesland, Ammerland, Cloppenburg and Emsland, and by the Netherlands ( Province of Groningen).

Leer

Leer is a town in the district of Leer, the northwestern part of Lower Saxony, Germany. It is situated on the river Leda, a tributary of the river Ems, near the border with the Netherlands.

It has a railway and autobahn connection to Groningen, Netherlands, Emden, Bremen and the South ( Rheine and the Ruhrpott industrial region).

Leer (disambiguation)

Leer is a town in Lower Saxony, Germany.

Leer may also refer to:

  • to look sideways or obliquely; especially with sexual desire or malicious intent
  • Leer County, an administrative division of Unity State in South Sudan
  • Leer (district), containing the town in Lower Saxony, Germany
  • Leer, South Sudan, headquarters of Leer County
  • Leer, Michigan, a small hamlet within Long Rapids Township, Michigan, USA

Usage examples of "leer".

He stood staring at Argot with a defiant leer made hideous by the terrible wound.

In the shelter of the stairway, Chun Laro leered above an out-thrust gun.

If Althrop could have leered like that in life, he would have applied the grin to one person only: Dariel Grebb.

And when I saw that the reef was but the black basalt crown of a shocking eikon whose monstrous forehead now shown in the dim moonlight and whose vile hooves must paw the hellish ooze miles below, I shrieked and shrieked lest the hidden face rise above the waters, and lest the hidden eyes look at me after the slinking away of that leering and treacherous yellow moon.

Here, Soy Foon observed a shrewd, leering face - a countenance that betokened both stealth and swiftness.

February 1943, the Gauleiter of Bavaria, Paul Giesler, to whom the Gestapo had brought a file of the letters, convoked the student body, announced that the physically unfit males - the able-bodied had been drafted into the Army - would be put to some kind of more useful war work, and with a leer suggested that the women students bear a child each year for the good of the Fatherland.

He saw Gnar, the bandit with the broken knee, crawling slowly backward across the ground, while Zack advanced on him with his face split into a menacing leer.

The leering face that showed by light from the window was that of Goofer Shayne.

Old Gower, too, has his Religion of Nature, with free admission for women, whom he worships in similes, running away from them, leering sheepishly.

Once the grinning idol of Hoom, devil god of the Chac Yuul, had leered down upon the splendid hall, squatting like a huge, obscene toad atop the dais of many steps.

And now the claret-coloured background was turning into a red field -- a field of red flowers, from which leered Portunus, and among which wept Ranulph.

The snake man leered down at Balthor, its sloped forehead spattered with its own green blood.

Sometimes he would take walks through shadowy tangles of unpaved musty-smelling lanes where eldritch brown houses of unknown age leaned and tottered and leered mockingly through narrow, small-paned windows.

It was probably sheer irrational instinct which made us dim our single torch--tempted no longer by the decadent and sinister sculptures that leered menacingly from the oppressive walls--and which softened our progress to a cautious tiptoeing and crawling over the increasingly littered floor and heaps of debris.

On this eery pinnacle a squared circle was formed, and in a few moments the sardonic desert moon leered down upon a battle which, but for the quality of the ringside cries, might well have occurred at some minor athletic club in America.