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The Collaborative International Dictionary

Inculcated

Inculcate \In*cul"cate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Inculcated; p. pr. & vb. n. Inculcating.] [L. inculcatus, p. p. of inculcare to tread on; pref. in- in, on + calcare to tread, fr. calx the heel; perh. akin to E. heel. Cf. 2d Calk, Heel.] To teach and impress by frequent repetitions or admonitions; to urge on the mind; as, Christ inculcates on his followers humility.

The most obvious and necessary duties of life they have not yet had authority enough to enforce and inculcate upon men's minds.
--S. Clarke.

Syn: To instill; infuse; implant; engraft; impress.

Wiktionary

inculcated

vb. (en-past of: inculcate)

Usage examples of "inculcated".

Whatever truth certain philosophers, amid their false opinions, were able to see, and strove by laborious discussions to persuade men of,-such as that God had made this world, and Himself most providently governs it, or of the nobility of the virtues, of the love of country, of fidelity in friendship, of good works and everything pertaining to virtuous manners, although they knew not to what end and what rule all these things were to be referred,-all these, by words prophetic, that is, divine, although spoken by men, were commended to the people in that city, and not inculcated by contention in arguments, so that he who should know them might be afraid of contemning, not the wit of men, but the oracle of God.

The interest, as well as the temper of the clergy, was favorable to the peace and union of their distracted country: those salutary lessons might be frequently inculcated in their popular discourses.

Each family contained a domestic tribunal, which was not confined, like that of the praetor, to the cognizance of external actions: virtuous principles and habits were inculcated by the discipline of education.

The Turkish conqueror smiled at the insolence of his captive observed that the Christian law inculcated the love of enemies and forgiveness of injuries.

After he had been declared a public enemy, it was his fervent wish to throw himself at the feet of the young emperor, and to receive without a murmur the stroke of the executioner: it was not without reluctance that he listened to the voice of reason, which inculcated the sacred duty of saving his family and friends, and proved that he could only save them by drawing the sword and assuming the Imperial title.

They embraced, indeed, the circles of kindred & friends, and inculcated patriotism, or the love of our country in the aggregate, as a primary obligation: toward our neighbors & countrymen they taught justice, but scarcely viewed them as within the circle of benevolence.

Still less have they inculcated peace, charity & love to our fellow men, or embraced with benevolence the whole family of mankind.

The whole religion of the Jews, inculcated on him from his infancy, was founded in the belief of divine inspiration.

How much more true, then, must all this be, when the one is not only under the authority of the other, but has it inculcated on her as a duty to reckon everything else subordinate to his comfort and pleasure, and to let him neither see nor feel anything coming from her, except what is agreeable to him.

As for charity, it is a matter in which the immediate effect on the persons directly concerned, and the ultimate consequence to the general good, are apt to be at complete war with one another: while the education given to women -- an education of the sentiments rather than of the understanding -- and the habit inculcated by their whole life, of looking to immediate effects on persons, and not to remote effects on classes of persons -- make them both unable to see, and unwilling to admit, the ultimate evil tendency of any form of charity or philanthropy which commends itself to their sympathetic feelings.

That simple minds, having been taught the obvious grounds of the truths inculcated on them, may trust to authority for the rest, and being aware that they have neither knowledge nor talent to resolve every difficulty which can be raised, may repose in the assurance that all those which have been raised have been or can be answered, by those who are specially trained to the task.

Every truth which men of narrow capacity are in earnest about, is sure to be asserted, inculcated, and in many ways even acted on, as if no other truth existed in the world, or at all events none that could limit or qualify the first.

He seemed to have very little regard for the conventions governing polite conduct, and Abby, in whom the conventions were deeply inculcated, was far less shocked than amused.

Among the rest, I became one of his constant hearers, his sermons pleasing me, as they had little of the dogmatical kind, but inculcated strongly the practice of virtue, or what in the religious stile are called good works.