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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

ill

I.adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a good/bad/ill omen
▪ The mist seemed like a bad omen and Sara’s heart sank a little.
a seriously ill/critically ill patient
▪ The ward was packed with seriously ill patients.
a seriously ill/critically ill patient
▪ The ward was packed with seriously ill patients.
a situation worsens/deteriorates/gets worse
▪ Reports from the area suggest the situation has worsened.
assume the worst (=think that the worst possible thing had happened)
▪ When it got to midnight and Paul was still not back, I began to assume the worst.
be bigger/smaller/worse etc than you had imagined
▪ The job interview proved to be much worse than I had imagined it would be.
desperately poor/ill/tired etc
▪ He was desperately ill with a fever.
ill feeling
▪ ‘I’m sorry. No ill feeling?’ ‘None,’ she replied.
ill health
▪ He retired early due to ill health.
ill will
▪ He said the accusation had been made from hatred and ill will.
least worst
▪ Often it’s a question of choosing the least worst option.
longer/higher/worse etc than usual
▪ It is taking longer than usual for orders to reach our customers.
make sth the best/worst/most expensive etc
▪ Over 80,000 people attended, making it the biggest sporting event in the area.
make things worse/easier/difficult
▪ Measures to slow down traffic on the main street have actually made things worse.
mentally ill
of the worst/best etc kind
▪ This is hypocrisy of the worst kind.
physically ill/sick
▪ The thought made her feel physically ill.
prepared for the worst (=expected something very bad)
▪ There was no news and we were prepared for the worst.
sb's eyesight gets worse/deteriorates
▪ Your eyesight gradually deteriorates with age.
sb's hearing gets worse (also sb's hearing deteriorates)
▪ The medication seemed to make her hearing get worse.
sb's worst nightmare (=the worst possible situation)
▪ The outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease was farming's worst nightmare.
sb’s worst/greatest fear
▪ Her worst fear was never seeing her children again.
seriously ill
▪ Her mother is seriously ill in hospital.
severely illformal:
▪ a hospital ward for severely ill patients
significantly better/greater/worse etc
▪ Delia’s work has been significantly better this year.
speak ill of sb (=say bad things about them)
▪ She never speaks ill of him.
take a turn for the worse/better
▪ Two days after the operation, Dad took a turn for the worse.
the best/worst kind
▪ Not knowing what had happened to her was the worst kind of torture.
the best/worst part
▪ The worst part was having to work even when it was raining.
the pain gets worse
▪ If the pain gets any worse, see your doctor.
the very best/latest/worst etc
▪ We only use the very best ingredients.
the worst hit
▪ The south of the country is the worst hit by the recession.
the worst moment
▪ Standing on the edge waiting to do your bungee jump is the worst moment.
the worst offender
▪ Among causes of air pollution, car exhaust fumes may be the worst offender.
the worst recession
▪ Colombia is going through its worst recession in decades.
the worst scandal (=the biggest or most shocking)
▪ Total losses resulting from India's worst financial scandal amounted to Rs31,000 million.
the worst-case/worst scenario (=the worst thing that might happen)
▪ The worst-case scenario is that it is already too late to do anything about global warming.
things get worse
▪ As the recession proceeds, things will get worse.
violently sick/ill
▪ He rushed to the bathroom, where he was violently sick.
went from bad to worse (=got even worse)
▪ When she arrived, things just went from bad to worse!
worse off
▪ The rent increases will leave us worse off.
worse than useless (=not useful, and causing harm or problems)
▪ It would be worse than useless to try and complain about him.
worst excesses
▪ He lived through some of the worst excesses of apartheid in South Africa.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
critically
▪ The abilities of staff and availability of facilities to care for critically ill patients vary in all areas of health care.
▪ If the infant is critically ill, we talk with them at least twice a day.
▪ In April 1946, Moritz was critically ill.
▪ He was taken to hospital critically ill with severe head injuries - leaving girlfriend Donna Lorenz, 23, speechless.
▪ Last night Suzanne was critically ill in intensive care at Withington Hospital.
▪ It will be the first journal to make immediately available findings that could save or extend the lives of critically ill patients.
▪ The unprovoked attack has left the man critically ill in hospital.
mentally
▪ Certainly those working with the mentally ill or the handicapped or the senile or in health education may properly think it is.
▪ Were these people normal or abnormal? Mentally ill or healthy?
▪ Firstly, the old person must be clinically diagnosed as mentally ill.
▪ The fact that Mississippi continues to hold people in jail simply because they are mentally ill is unacceptable and inhumane.
▪ Two psychiatrists said that although Bourgois was mentally ill they did not believe he needed to be detained further.
▪ The mentally ill are also committing crimes.
▪ Private insurance schemes clearly do not wish to become involved with either the mentally ill or the chronically sick.
▪ Unlike many of the mentally ill, epileptics often have quite a bit of insight into their problem.
seriously
▪ Becky Blandford, who's still seriously ill more than forty eight hours after a hunting accident.
▪ Making matters worse, our system financially punishes people for being seriously ill and not dying quickly enough.
▪ The Marchioness of Blandford is still seriously ill from head injuries after a hunting accident at the weekend.
▪ The Empress, who had been seriously ill, died of diabetes soon afterwards.
▪ The sole survivor, Barry O'Shaughnessy, 19, was seriously ill in hospital last night.
▪ The other man, said to be a workmate, is seriously ill.
▪ Two men were killed in Monday's explosion at Castleford, Yorks, and three are still seriously ill in hospital.
▪ Key forward Tom Cleland was missing after his wife was taken to hospital early this morning seriously ill.
terminally
▪ It reminded her of a conference of terminally ill teetotallers.
▪ Ray, now 69 and terminally ill with liver disease, has repeatedly changed his story over the years.
▪ Theirs had been a terminally ill situation with so few worshippers in so large and expensive a building.
▪ It is a small group of volunteers who counsel patients who are terminally ill.
▪ The hospice movement, in its care of the terminally ill, is the living recognition of these sombre facts.
▪ Who could blame a wife, herself elderly and in poor health, for suggesting suicide to her terminally ill husband?
▪ A high proportion of us die not at home, but in hospitals, clinics and special institutions for the terminally ill.
▪ They represent a group of terminally ill patients and their doctors.
■ NOUN
health
▪ Thus, informal admissions were characterized by a combination of mental ill health and transgression of traditional social role expectations.
▪ Very likely physicians would not recommend the exercise of that or of any other trade as a remedy for ill health.
▪ Some of them were so nasty that they had learned to disguise most symptoms of ill health from her.
▪ There are a whole lot of senators in worse health than Strom Thurmond.
▪ Half of those not employed gave ill health as the reason.
▪ She was starting at zero as she had very poor schooling due to ill health.
▪ But we wanted to explore the causes of ill health further.
▪ In his later years he suffered ill health and his work was curtailed.
will
▪ He accused his estranged wife of being paranoid - but said he felt no ill will toward her.
▪ Months of pent-up anger, frustration, and ill will were vented at Scottsdale.
▪ Could she have treated him to similar displays of ill will as she showed her daughter?
▪ Denying his guilt to the last, he said he didn't bear his wife any ill will.
▪ This is accepted as part of the natural order and causes no ill will amongst the Knightly Orders.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a fate worse than death
▪ I knew that Grandma's visit would be a fate worse than death.
▪ After all, she didn't know him, and a fate worse than death might just be awaiting her.
▪ It certainly wasn't because he was trying to save her from a Fate Worse than Death.
▪ There are various Pelagias who are known as penitent harlots or virgin martyrs who died to escape a fate worse than death.
▪ We've even growled at the horse, and threatened it with a fate worse than death, but to no avail!
at (the) worst
▪ Many drivers feel their job is unpleasant at best, and dangerous at worst.
▪ Developing these required equations is at best difficult and at worst nearly impossible.
▪ Him, with him: the worst man in the worst place at the worst time.
▪ If we drop a tin can probably nothing will happen; at the worst we may make a small dent.
▪ In most cases doing a course of any kind will, at worst, just be a small waste of time.
▪ Naturally, it happened at the worst possible time.
▪ Patient and neutral stares at worst.
▪ The first assumption of the Census Bureau, therefore, must be viewed as fatuous at worst, naive at best.
▪ Up until then I had sometimes seen writing as at best a compulsion and at worst a sickness.
at your best/worst/most effective etc
augur well/badly/ill
▪ Enjoyment of one's past job does not augur well for contentment in the role of housewife.
▪ In another development that does not augur well for transatlantic trade, Zoellick formally asked the U.S.
▪ It hardly augurs well - especially as none of them have won an international in Paris.
▪ Such potential augurs well for the 1990s.
▪ That augured well for the day.
▪ That, at least, augured well.
▪ This augurs well for the future and underlines the truth that music as a universal language is an important resource for ecumenism.
bad/ill feeling
▪ There have been bad feelings between area residents and police.
▪ Even though Amelia participated so little in school activities, she harbored no ill feelings toward Hyde Park.
▪ I figure there had to be some bad feeling.
▪ I got a very bad feeling as we pitched into the bathroom and-fumbled for the mouthwash.
▪ I have bad feelings for the smugglers, though.
▪ It's got bad feelings for me, this room.
▪ It was the start of bad feeling between the two.
▪ Jane Blasio harbors no ill feelings toward Hicks.
▪ There is no bad feeling between us.
be taken ill/sick
▪ At two years and a half, he was taken ill with pneumonia.
▪ During the siege of Bristol he was taken ill with the plague and again feared for his life.
▪ His sister ate one, and was taken ill.
▪ Several of the team were taken ill.
▪ Taylor, 47, was taken ill last week while working on his third album in a Florida recording studio.
▪ Then Mum had cancer and Dad was taken ill at work.
▪ We were just about to go abroad when our usual nanny was taken ill and was advised not to travel.
▪ Whilst in Fort William she was taken ill with stomach pains.
be your own worst enemy
▪ Many drivers are their own worst enemy -- driving too close, driving too fast, all the usual faults.
▪ My mother was her own worst enemy. She knew she was ill but she did nothing to help herself.
▪ In other words, we are our own worst enemy.
▪ My father was his own worst enemy.
▪ People are their own worst enemies.
▪ Players can be real snobs about names, too, so they are their own worst enemies.
▪ To what extent would she say she was her own worst enemy?
▪ You could say that Gilly is her own worst enemy.
better/harder/worse etc still
▪ And 245 specialty stock funds that focus on particular industries did better still, averaging a 6. 5 percent gain.
▪ But perhaps the early evening was better still?
▪ He didn't talk because he was afraid of losing the pole or, worse still, falling in.
▪ I started to hunt for a cheap restaurant or, better still, a snack shop.
▪ I thought that it would soon pass, and it did - for you to work harder still.
▪ Or better still, make a real talent show instead.
▪ Or better still, there was the village school practically next door!
▪ With hindsight, it would have better still to lock in a few more gains.
bode well/ill (for sb/sth)
▪ The results of the opinion poll do not bode well for the Democrats.
▪ Even if they are fictional characters, it doesn't bode well for the poor things.
▪ Somehow, it bodes well for the couture.
▪ The evening had, on reflection, never boded well.
▪ Things had connected, falling into a new shape - a shape that bode well for the future.
▪ Those numbers bode well for the Raiders.
▪ Unsurprisingly, refugees often fell into a torpid dependency, which did not bode well for the future.
▪ Word on the street is that Sub Pop refused the new Friends' second album, which may not bode well.
▪ Yet, conservation biologists have begun to wonder if these long-hoped-for changes bode well for the land.
bring out the best/worst in sb
▪ Ingram always seems to bring out the best in his players.
▪ And Vince was obviously a great coach; he brought out the best in his team and whoever played him.
▪ But the Washington Wizards have a way of bringing out the best in their opponents.
▪ But, says Markert, there is something about one-way communication that can also bring out the worst in people.
▪ Campaigns seem to bring out the worst in Bob Dole.
▪ It brings out the best in us.
▪ Maybe something like they tend to bring out the best in us.
▪ So, to bring out the best in your cooking make sure you use the purest soy sauce, Kikkoman Soy Sauce.
▪ Yet it was not an unsuccessful attempt to bring out the best in his audience.
come off best/better/worst etc
▪ Alec Davidson, for example, was one of those who came off worst.
▪ Bullock comes off best because her complaining seems so valid.
▪ His foster-child comes off best, but in addition each of two nurses receives a tenth of his estate.
▪ It may seem, so far, that in terms of clearly defined benefits, the client comes off best out of the deal.
▪ Prior to that Meath had come off best when they accounted for Down in the 1990 league decider.
▪ The lightning, it seemed to Lydia, had undoubtedly come off best in that encounter.
▪ The problem is that history sometimes comes off better.
couldn't be better/worse/more pleased etc
critically ill/injured
▪ A businessman walking to his car was struck by lightning and critically injured as co-workers watched in awe.
▪ He was taken to hospital critically ill with severe head injuries - leaving girlfriend Donna Lorenz, 23, speechless.
▪ If the infant is critically ill, we talk with them at least twice a day.
▪ In April 1946, Moritz was critically ill.
▪ Last night Suzanne was critically ill in intensive care at Withington Hospital.
▪ The abilities of staff and availability of facilities to care for critically ill patients vary in all areas of health care.
do your/his/her/their worst
▪ Let her do her worst to reach him.
▪ Sometimes they successfully slowed or blocked the path of the conquistadores when these exploiters were out to do their worst.
expect/fear the worst
▪ Distillery boss Billy Hamilton fears the worst after Heath was assisted off in the second-half with a torn calf muscle.
▪ From what he has heard he fears the worst about the likelihood of a quick turnaround on the field.
▪ I knew I was being irrational but I began to fear the worst.
▪ Leading the mob assault into the fisherman's cabin, the pastor expects the worst.
▪ Only then did we begin to fear the worst.
▪ Quite frankly we expected the worst.
fear the worst
Fearing the worst, police have called in reinforcements to help control the crowds.
▪ After I hadn't heard from him for several hours, I began to fear the worst.
▪ Rescuers feared the worst for the men trapped in the mine.
▪ I knew I was being irrational but I began to fear the worst.
▪ Mind you, I feared the worst for this year's crop of pantomimes.
▪ Only then did we begin to fear the worst.
▪ Rumours about impending changes will occur anyway, and staff not fully informed are likely to fear the worst.
▪ Then they called police and stayed up all night -- fearing the worst.
for better or (for) worse
▪ The reality is that, for better or worse, the world of publishing has changed.
▪ All five, for better or worse, have received recent votes of confidence from their respective general managers or team presidents.
▪ And for better or worse, the new interactivity brings enormous political leverage to ordinary citizens at relatively little cost.
▪ And the consequences could be even more startling, for better or for worse.
▪ Decisions made in any of these places can hit our pocketbooks and our peace of mind, for better or for worse.
▪ He has toted the ball and the expectations, for better or worse.
▪ He was her husband ... for better or worse, he was her husband.
▪ Medical students in prolonged contact with junior doctors learn attitudes by example, for better or for worse.
▪ Today we know for better or for worse that cops, like doctors and priests, are merely human.
get/have the worst of it
▪ I should not have exasperated him for I always have the worst of it.
if the worst comes to the worst
ill at ease
▪ Dave always looks ill at ease in a suit.
▪ Rehnquist sometimes can appear ill at ease in public.
▪ And all of this is inevitable, for Utopians are ill at ease at the sharp end of politics.
▪ By the way, most women are very ill at ease when you call them out from the jury pool.
▪ He is extremely ill at ease.
▪ He looked about him, for once strangely ill at ease, disconcerted to learn that she had ridden off ahead of him.
▪ If people are already ill at ease in unfamiliar surroundings the order of service becomes another pressure.
▪ Nevertheless, their formality sits ill at ease with Esau's spontaneous show of love.
▪ The thought of confinement can make me ill at ease.
▪ They looked ill at ease in the same camera frame.
in a good/an ill/a bad humour
none the worse/better etc (for sth)
▪ Although the animal glowed rosy-pink, it appeared none the worse for its ordeal.
▪ I recovered, my mouth none the worse for it, after all.
▪ Peter's little pet was clearly none the worse for its time in the underworld.
sb's bark is worse than their bite
sb's worst fears were realized
▪ My worst fears were realized when I saw the test questions.
▪ His worst fears were realized and he was arrested.
take a turn for the worse
▪ Stock prices have taken a turn for the worse.
the biggest/worst etc (sth) yet
▪ And the worst was yet to come.
▪ Her third night here and it had been the worst one yet.
▪ No, the worst ... Yet is she listening now?
▪ That was the worst task yet, as Psyche saw when she approached the waterfall.
▪ The decision opens the biggest policy rift yet between Holyrood and Westminster.
▪ The two have returned from a disastrous holiday in Greecebut the worst is yet to come.
the worst
▪ Most of the girls were pretty mean, but Sabrina was the worst.
the worst of sth
▪ Against the far wall, shielded from the worst of the rain, were five bodies neatly laid out.
▪ And the worst of the caregivers were a disaster.
▪ And then there's you. ` ` Me? ` ` You're the worst of the lot.
▪ At this moment in history, however, the White House personifies the worst of political greed and excess.
▪ Black people, for example, need not imitate the worst of white competitive consumers.
▪ By the middle of the next afternoon, the worst of the headache was gone.
▪ On the eve of the council the worst of horrors was revealed.
▪ Would she ring the warning bell that cushioned the little fellow from the worst of it?
think the best/worst of sb
▪ Ellie's the type of person that always thinks the best of people.
▪ He thought the worst of Mitch and clearly thought that left to herself she would ring London at once.
▪ I was so ready to think the worst of him, she wailed inwardly.
▪ My immediate reaction, whether it be a man or a woman, is to think the worst of them.
▪ The prospect of Guy leaving, thinking the worst of her, was unbearable.
▪ Why should you think the worst of me?
▪ You always think the worst of me.
worse luck
▪ Bad luck for Venus, worse luck for the 12,000 fans, but hey, what can you do?
▪ I have to go to secretarial school, worse luck.
▪ Nearly all gone now, worse luck, and the guv'nor's arrived to read the riot act.
▪ You're a bad agent and you're worse luck.
▪ You go up there with the wrong attitude and come out with worse luck than you had before.
worst of all
▪ Mike's so boring, and worst of all he never stops talking.
▪ And worst of all, the Hare got rid Of far more than the Tortoise did.
▪ And worst of all, their services are no longer in demand.
▪ And, worst of all, you don't remember who you are.
▪ But worst of all were the comparisons being made between Monty Clift and Jekyll and Hyde.
▪ Or, worst of all, exploding at work?
▪ Perhaps worst of all, there are those stressful situations where one is accustomed to turn to tobacco for support.
▪ The twelfth labor was the worst of all.
▪ To abuse hospitality was the most horrid thing; worst of all.
you would be well/ill advised to do sth
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ All that week, Catherine lay ill, drifting in and out of consciousness.
▪ Apparently Don's wife is seriously ill, and they think it might be cancer.
▪ Mel was so ill that she had to stay in bed for a month.
▪ Mentally ill patients have the same rights as anyone else.
▪ psychological support for terminally ill patients
▪ The baby caught a virus and became critically ill.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Her makeup so unbelievably dramatic, so abnormal, she looked mentally ill.
▪ I felt helpless and despairing and suddenly so ill that I had to clutch at the door to stop myself falling.
▪ One civil servant has retired on ill health grounds and two downgraded.
II.adverb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ VERB
afford
▪ Many of them are in fact very poor and can ill afford their habit.
▪ The nation could ill afford a logy commander-in-chief in the event of nuclear attack.
▪ But Kevin Curren struck some crucial blows - runs that Warwickshire could ill afford to concede at this stage of the match.
▪ Often it is something they can ill afford.
▪ He could ill afford to lose such support in 1946, the year of the mid-term elections.
▪ Sotheby's can ill afford to have its auction prices called into question.
▪ There may be no alternative to leave of absence, even though the nurse can ill afford the loss of income.
▪ Hadn't she already taken time off work which she could ill afford in her sister's interests?
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a fate worse than death
▪ I knew that Grandma's visit would be a fate worse than death.
▪ After all, she didn't know him, and a fate worse than death might just be awaiting her.
▪ It certainly wasn't because he was trying to save her from a Fate Worse than Death.
▪ There are various Pelagias who are known as penitent harlots or virgin martyrs who died to escape a fate worse than death.
▪ We've even growled at the horse, and threatened it with a fate worse than death, but to no avail!
at (the) worst
▪ Many drivers feel their job is unpleasant at best, and dangerous at worst.
▪ Developing these required equations is at best difficult and at worst nearly impossible.
▪ Him, with him: the worst man in the worst place at the worst time.
▪ If we drop a tin can probably nothing will happen; at the worst we may make a small dent.
▪ In most cases doing a course of any kind will, at worst, just be a small waste of time.
▪ Naturally, it happened at the worst possible time.
▪ Patient and neutral stares at worst.
▪ The first assumption of the Census Bureau, therefore, must be viewed as fatuous at worst, naive at best.
▪ Up until then I had sometimes seen writing as at best a compulsion and at worst a sickness.
at your best/worst/most effective etc
augur well/badly/ill
▪ Enjoyment of one's past job does not augur well for contentment in the role of housewife.
▪ In another development that does not augur well for transatlantic trade, Zoellick formally asked the U.S.
▪ It hardly augurs well - especially as none of them have won an international in Paris.
▪ Such potential augurs well for the 1990s.
▪ That augured well for the day.
▪ That, at least, augured well.
▪ This augurs well for the future and underlines the truth that music as a universal language is an important resource for ecumenism.
bad/ill feeling
▪ There have been bad feelings between area residents and police.
▪ Even though Amelia participated so little in school activities, she harbored no ill feelings toward Hyde Park.
▪ I figure there had to be some bad feeling.
▪ I got a very bad feeling as we pitched into the bathroom and-fumbled for the mouthwash.
▪ I have bad feelings for the smugglers, though.
▪ It's got bad feelings for me, this room.
▪ It was the start of bad feeling between the two.
▪ Jane Blasio harbors no ill feelings toward Hicks.
▪ There is no bad feeling between us.
be none the worse for sth
be taken ill/sick
▪ At two years and a half, he was taken ill with pneumonia.
▪ During the siege of Bristol he was taken ill with the plague and again feared for his life.
▪ His sister ate one, and was taken ill.
▪ Several of the team were taken ill.
▪ Taylor, 47, was taken ill last week while working on his third album in a Florida recording studio.
▪ Then Mum had cancer and Dad was taken ill at work.
▪ We were just about to go abroad when our usual nanny was taken ill and was advised not to travel.
▪ Whilst in Fort William she was taken ill with stomach pains.
be your own worst enemy
▪ Many drivers are their own worst enemy -- driving too close, driving too fast, all the usual faults.
▪ My mother was her own worst enemy. She knew she was ill but she did nothing to help herself.
▪ In other words, we are our own worst enemy.
▪ My father was his own worst enemy.
▪ People are their own worst enemies.
▪ Players can be real snobs about names, too, so they are their own worst enemies.
▪ To what extent would she say she was her own worst enemy?
▪ You could say that Gilly is her own worst enemy.
be your own worst enemy
▪ In other words, we are our own worst enemy.
▪ My father was his own worst enemy.
▪ People are their own worst enemies.
▪ Players can be real snobs about names, too, so they are their own worst enemies.
▪ To what extent would she say she was her own worst enemy?
▪ You could say that Gilly is her own worst enemy.
better/harder/worse etc still
▪ And 245 specialty stock funds that focus on particular industries did better still, averaging a 6. 5 percent gain.
▪ But perhaps the early evening was better still?
▪ He didn't talk because he was afraid of losing the pole or, worse still, falling in.
▪ I started to hunt for a cheap restaurant or, better still, a snack shop.
▪ I thought that it would soon pass, and it did - for you to work harder still.
▪ Or better still, make a real talent show instead.
▪ Or better still, there was the village school practically next door!
▪ With hindsight, it would have better still to lock in a few more gains.
bode well/ill (for sb/sth)
▪ The results of the opinion poll do not bode well for the Democrats.
▪ Even if they are fictional characters, it doesn't bode well for the poor things.
▪ Somehow, it bodes well for the couture.
▪ The evening had, on reflection, never boded well.
▪ Things had connected, falling into a new shape - a shape that bode well for the future.
▪ Those numbers bode well for the Raiders.
▪ Unsurprisingly, refugees often fell into a torpid dependency, which did not bode well for the future.
▪ Word on the street is that Sub Pop refused the new Friends' second album, which may not bode well.
▪ Yet, conservation biologists have begun to wonder if these long-hoped-for changes bode well for the land.
bring out the best/worst in sb
▪ Ingram always seems to bring out the best in his players.
▪ And Vince was obviously a great coach; he brought out the best in his team and whoever played him.
▪ But the Washington Wizards have a way of bringing out the best in their opponents.
▪ But, says Markert, there is something about one-way communication that can also bring out the worst in people.
▪ Campaigns seem to bring out the worst in Bob Dole.
▪ It brings out the best in us.
▪ Maybe something like they tend to bring out the best in us.
▪ So, to bring out the best in your cooking make sure you use the purest soy sauce, Kikkoman Soy Sauce.
▪ Yet it was not an unsuccessful attempt to bring out the best in his audience.
come off best/better/worst etc
▪ Alec Davidson, for example, was one of those who came off worst.
▪ Bullock comes off best because her complaining seems so valid.
▪ His foster-child comes off best, but in addition each of two nurses receives a tenth of his estate.
▪ It may seem, so far, that in terms of clearly defined benefits, the client comes off best out of the deal.
▪ Prior to that Meath had come off best when they accounted for Down in the 1990 league decider.
▪ The lightning, it seemed to Lydia, had undoubtedly come off best in that encounter.
▪ The problem is that history sometimes comes off better.
come off worst
▪ Alec Davidson, for example, was one of those who came off worst.
couldn't be better/worse/more pleased etc
critically ill/injured
▪ A businessman walking to his car was struck by lightning and critically injured as co-workers watched in awe.
▪ He was taken to hospital critically ill with severe head injuries - leaving girlfriend Donna Lorenz, 23, speechless.
▪ If the infant is critically ill, we talk with them at least twice a day.
▪ In April 1946, Moritz was critically ill.
▪ Last night Suzanne was critically ill in intensive care at Withington Hospital.
▪ The abilities of staff and availability of facilities to care for critically ill patients vary in all areas of health care.
do your/his/her/their worst
▪ Let her do her worst to reach him.
▪ Sometimes they successfully slowed or blocked the path of the conquistadores when these exploiters were out to do their worst.
expect/fear the worst
▪ Distillery boss Billy Hamilton fears the worst after Heath was assisted off in the second-half with a torn calf muscle.
▪ From what he has heard he fears the worst about the likelihood of a quick turnaround on the field.
▪ I knew I was being irrational but I began to fear the worst.
▪ Leading the mob assault into the fisherman's cabin, the pastor expects the worst.
▪ Only then did we begin to fear the worst.
▪ Quite frankly we expected the worst.
fear the worst
Fearing the worst, police have called in reinforcements to help control the crowds.
▪ After I hadn't heard from him for several hours, I began to fear the worst.
▪ Rescuers feared the worst for the men trapped in the mine.
▪ I knew I was being irrational but I began to fear the worst.
▪ Mind you, I feared the worst for this year's crop of pantomimes.
▪ Only then did we begin to fear the worst.
▪ Rumours about impending changes will occur anyway, and staff not fully informed are likely to fear the worst.
▪ Then they called police and stayed up all night -- fearing the worst.
for better or (for) worse
▪ The reality is that, for better or worse, the world of publishing has changed.
▪ All five, for better or worse, have received recent votes of confidence from their respective general managers or team presidents.
▪ And for better or worse, the new interactivity brings enormous political leverage to ordinary citizens at relatively little cost.
▪ And the consequences could be even more startling, for better or for worse.
▪ Decisions made in any of these places can hit our pocketbooks and our peace of mind, for better or for worse.
▪ He has toted the ball and the expectations, for better or worse.
▪ He was her husband ... for better or worse, he was her husband.
▪ Medical students in prolonged contact with junior doctors learn attitudes by example, for better or for worse.
▪ Today we know for better or for worse that cops, like doctors and priests, are merely human.
get/have the worst of it
▪ I should not have exasperated him for I always have the worst of it.
go from bad to worse
▪ The rail service has gone from bad to worse since it was privatised.
▪ The schools have gone from bad to worse in this area.
▪ Things went from bad to worse, and soon the pair were barely talking to each other.
▪ As 1931 went from bad to worse the possibility of another marriage began to seem her best hope of salvation.
▪ It went from bad to worse as the heavens opened and turned the circuit into one huge puddle.
▪ Matters continued to go from bad to worse.
▪ Matters went from bad to worse.
▪ On Ithaca, the island where his home was, things had gone from bad to worse.
▪ That they are going from bad to worse.
go from bad to worse
▪ As 1931 went from bad to worse the possibility of another marriage began to seem her best hope of salvation.
▪ It went from bad to worse as the heavens opened and turned the circuit into one huge puddle.
▪ Matters continued to go from bad to worse.
▪ Matters went from bad to worse.
▪ On Ithaca, the island where his home was, things had gone from bad to worse.
▪ That they are going from bad to worse.
if the worst comes to the worst
ill at ease
▪ Dave always looks ill at ease in a suit.
▪ Rehnquist sometimes can appear ill at ease in public.
▪ And all of this is inevitable, for Utopians are ill at ease at the sharp end of politics.
▪ By the way, most women are very ill at ease when you call them out from the jury pool.
▪ He is extremely ill at ease.
▪ He looked about him, for once strangely ill at ease, disconcerted to learn that she had ridden off ahead of him.
▪ If people are already ill at ease in unfamiliar surroundings the order of service becomes another pressure.
▪ Nevertheless, their formality sits ill at ease with Esau's spontaneous show of love.
▪ The thought of confinement can make me ill at ease.
▪ They looked ill at ease in the same camera frame.
in a good/an ill/a bad humour
none the worse/better etc (for sth)
▪ Although the animal glowed rosy-pink, it appeared none the worse for its ordeal.
▪ I recovered, my mouth none the worse for it, after all.
▪ Peter's little pet was clearly none the worse for its time in the underworld.
sb could do worse than do sth
▪ A woman could do worse than be a nurse.
▪ He could do worse than spend his evening keeping an eye on her.
▪ In groping for useful precedents, one could do worse than heed the tale of a man named Sherwood Rowland.
▪ The West could do worse than to base its policy towards the Middle East on that aspiration.
▪ You could do worse than take a leaf out of the health economists' book.
sb's bark is worse than their bite
sb's worst fears were realized
▪ My worst fears were realized when I saw the test questions.
▪ His worst fears were realized and he was arrested.
take a turn for the worse
▪ Stock prices have taken a turn for the worse.
the biggest/worst etc (sth) yet
▪ And the worst was yet to come.
▪ Her third night here and it had been the worst one yet.
▪ No, the worst ... Yet is she listening now?
▪ That was the worst task yet, as Psyche saw when she approached the waterfall.
▪ The decision opens the biggest policy rift yet between Holyrood and Westminster.
▪ The two have returned from a disastrous holiday in Greecebut the worst is yet to come.
the worse for wear
▪ Architectural details there were few and those were the worse for wear.
▪ But I can see he's the worse for wear, the weathering the worker wreaks on himself.
▪ But I digress ... We are all somewhat the worse for wear after a long night in the hotel bar.
▪ Here I was, returning from a presidential mission, and plainly the worse for wear.
▪ It was a long evening, and he arrived home at two in the morning, much the worse for wear.
▪ John McGuire was slightly the worse for wear after his night out with his wife.
▪ They were a bit the worse for wear; the flat was not clean and was damp.
the worst
▪ Most of the girls were pretty mean, but Sabrina was the worst.
the worst of sth
▪ Against the far wall, shielded from the worst of the rain, were five bodies neatly laid out.
▪ And the worst of the caregivers were a disaster.
▪ And then there's you. ` ` Me? ` ` You're the worst of the lot.
▪ At this moment in history, however, the White House personifies the worst of political greed and excess.
▪ Black people, for example, need not imitate the worst of white competitive consumers.
▪ By the middle of the next afternoon, the worst of the headache was gone.
▪ On the eve of the council the worst of horrors was revealed.
▪ Would she ring the warning bell that cushioned the little fellow from the worst of it?
think the best/worst of sb
▪ Ellie's the type of person that always thinks the best of people.
▪ He thought the worst of Mitch and clearly thought that left to herself she would ring London at once.
▪ I was so ready to think the worst of him, she wailed inwardly.
▪ My immediate reaction, whether it be a man or a woman, is to think the worst of them.
▪ The prospect of Guy leaving, thinking the worst of her, was unbearable.
▪ Why should you think the worst of me?
▪ You always think the worst of me.
worse luck
▪ Bad luck for Venus, worse luck for the 12,000 fans, but hey, what can you do?
▪ I have to go to secretarial school, worse luck.
▪ Nearly all gone now, worse luck, and the guv'nor's arrived to read the riot act.
▪ You're a bad agent and you're worse luck.
▪ You go up there with the wrong attitude and come out with worse luck than you had before.
worse luck
▪ Bad luck for Venus, worse luck for the 12,000 fans, but hey, what can you do?
▪ I have to go to secretarial school, worse luck.
▪ Nearly all gone now, worse luck, and the guv'nor's arrived to read the riot act.
▪ You're a bad agent and you're worse luck.
▪ You go up there with the wrong attitude and come out with worse luck than you had before.
worst of all
▪ Mike's so boring, and worst of all he never stops talking.
▪ And worst of all, the Hare got rid Of far more than the Tortoise did.
▪ And worst of all, their services are no longer in demand.
▪ And, worst of all, you don't remember who you are.
▪ But worst of all were the comparisons being made between Monty Clift and Jekyll and Hyde.
▪ Or, worst of all, exploding at work?
▪ Perhaps worst of all, there are those stressful situations where one is accustomed to turn to tobacco for support.
▪ The twelfth labor was the worst of all.
▪ To abuse hospitality was the most horrid thing; worst of all.
you would be well/ill advised to do sth
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ The animals had been ill-treated by their owner.
▪ We were ill-prepared to camp out in the snow.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ If so, it seems ill mannered at best.
▪ The Crolgarian police are ill equipped for an investigation of this kind.
III.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
economic
▪ Immigrant workers, easy scapegoats for the newly reunited country's economic ills, have been the latest victims of bigoted violence.
▪ As well as Swindon's economic ills, she's hoping Dons can help cure her back pains.
▪ The mullahs were no better at curing characteristic third world socio-#economic ills than the secular regimes they despised.
▪ Her comments on Radio Derby came as Tories tried to shift the blame for Britain's economic ills elsewhere.
▪ Investment is often portrayed as a cure-all for the economic ills of rich countries.
▪ From this perspective democratic politics, and the two-party system in particular, was the problem and the cause of our economic ills.
▪ A remedy for economic ills is suggested.
▪ Most corporate acquisitions achieve little for society as whole and tend to worsen economic ills in the older cities.
social
▪ Poor housing and other social ills provide no kind of reason for riot, arson and killing.
▪ Television is often blamed for all kinds of social ills!
■ VERB
cure
▪ Like Euripides she believed the sea could cure the ills of man.
▪ I believe my violence will cure their ills!
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Even though I don't agree with him, I do not wish Baxter any ill.
▪ Tuesday's game had to be cancelled because of illness.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ In the book, Godwin eloquently describes in words and photographs the ills our land is prey to.
▪ That was the rich man's panacea for the litany of ills of the poor.
▪ The Deputy Governor of Bullwood provided a comprehensive analysis of the system's ills before the Sub-Committee.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Ill

Ill \Ill\ ([i^]l), a. [The regular comparative and superlative are wanting, their places being supplied by worseand worst, from another root.] [OE. ill, ille, Icel. illr; akin to Sw. illa, adv., Dan. ilde, adv.]

  1. Contrary to good, in a physical sense; contrary or opposed to advantage, happiness, etc.; bad; evil; unfortunate; disagreeable; unfavorable.

    Neither is it ill air only that maketh an ill seat, but ill ways, ill markets, and ill neighbors.
    --Bacon.

    There 's some ill planet reigns.
    --Shak.

  2. Contrary to good, in a moral sense; evil; wicked; wrong; iniquitious; naughtly; bad; improper.

    Of his own body he was ill, and gave The clergy ill example.
    --Shak.

  3. Sick; indisposed; unwell; diseased; disordered; as, ill of a fever.

    I am in health, I breathe, and see thee ill.
    --Shak.

  4. Not according with rule, fitness, or propriety; incorrect; rude; unpolished; inelegant. That 's an ill phrase. --Shak. Ill at ease, uneasy; uncomfortable; anxious. ``I am very ill at ease.'' --Shak. Ill blood, enmity; resentment; bad blood. Ill breeding, lack of good breeding; rudeness. Ill fame, ill or bad repute; as, a house of ill fame, a house where lewd persons meet for illicit intercourse. Ill humor, a disagreeable mood; bad temper. Ill nature, bad disposition or temperament; sullenness; esp., a disposition to cause unhappiness to others. Ill temper, anger; moroseness; crossness. Ill turn.

    1. An unkind act.

    2. A slight attack of illness. [Colloq. U.S.] -- Ill will, unkindness; enmity; malevolence.

      Syn: Bad; evil; wrong; wicked; sick; unwell.

Ill

Ill \Ill\, n.

  1. Whatever annoys or impairs happiness, or prevents success; evil of any kind; misfortune; calamity; disease; pain; as, the ills of humanity.

    Who can all sense of others' ills escape Is but a brute at best in human shape.
    --Tate.

    That makes us rather bear those ills we have Than fly to others that we know not of.
    --Shak.

  2. Whatever is contrary to good, in a moral sense; wickedness; depravity; iniquity; wrong; evil.

    Strong virtue, like strong nature, struggles still, Exerts itself, and then throws off the ill.
    --Dryden.

Ill

Ill \Ill\, adv. In a ill manner; badly; weakly.

How ill this taper burns!
--Shak.

Ill fares the land, to hastening ills a prey, Where wealth accumulates and men decay.
--Goldsmith.

Note: Ill, like above, well, and so, is used before many participal adjectives, in its usual adverbal sense. When the two words are used as an epithet preceding the noun qualified they are commonly hyphened; in other cases they are written separatively; as, an ill-educated man; he was ill educated; an ill-formed plan; the plan, however ill formed, was acceptable. Ao, also, the following: ill-affected or ill affected, ill-arranged or ill arranged, ill-assorted or ill assorted, ill-boding or ill boding, ill-bred or ill bred, ill-conditioned, ill-conducted, ill-considered, ill-devised, ill-disposed, ill-doing, ill-fairing, ill-fated, ill-favored, ill-featured, ill-formed, ill-gotten, ill-imagined, ill-judged, ill-looking, ill-mannered, ill-matched, ill-meaning, ill-minded, ill-natured, ill-omened, ill-proportioned, ill-provided, ill-required, ill-sorted, ill-starred, ill-tempered, ill-timed, ill-trained, ill-used, and the like.

Wikipedia

Ill (France)

The Ill (; ) is a river in Alsace, in north-eastern France. It is a left bank, or western tributary of the Rhine.

It starts down from its source near the village of Winkel, in the Jura mountains, with a resurgence near Ligsdorf, turns around Ferrette on its east side, and then runs northward through Alsace, flowing parallel to the Rhine. Taking apart the Largue, also coming from the Jura mountains near Illfurth, it receives several tributaries from the west bank Vosges mountains after passing through Altkirch: the Doller in Mulhouse, the Thur near Ensisheim, the Lauch in Colmar, the Fecht in Illhaeusern, the Giessen in Sélestat, the Andlau near Fegersheim, the Ehn near Geispolsheim, the Bruche next to Strasbourg and the Souffel upstream from La Wantzenau before meeting with the Rhine downstream from Gambsheim's lock.

As the Ill nears the city of Mulhouse, most of its flow is diverted into a discharge channel leading to the Doller, protecting the historical center of the town from floods.

Flowing through the city of Strasbourg, the river forms part of the 17th-century fortifications and passes through a series of locks and channels in the picturesque old town, including the Petite France quarter, where its waters were once used to power mills and tanneries. One of these channels is the Canal du Faux-Rempart that, together with the main channel of the Ill, surrounds the Grande Île or historic centre of Strasbourg.

Ill (Vorarlberg)

The Ill (all capitals: ILL) is a 72 km long tributary of the Rhine in the western Austrian province of Vorarlberg.

It flows from the northern slopes of the Silvretta mountain range and then runs north-west through Vorarlberg. The Ill passes through the Montafon and Walgau valleys and the town Feldkirch. It joins the river Rhine a few kilometers northwest of Feldkirch ("Illspitz"), at the border with Switzerland. The Ill has several dams with hydroelectric power stations.

Category:Alpine Rhine basin Category:Rivers of Vorarlberg Category:Bregenz Forest Mountains Category:Verwall Alps Category:Silvretta Alps

Ill (Saarland)

Ill (Saarland) is a river of Saarland, Germany.

WordNet

ill

  1. adj. not in good physical or mental health; "ill from the monotony of his suffering" [syn: sick] [ant: well]

  2. resulting in suffering or adversity; "ill effects"; "it's an ill wind that blows no good"

  3. distressing; "ill manners"; "of ill repute"

  4. indicating hostility or enmity; "you certainly did me an ill turn"; "ill feelings"; "ill will"

  5. presaging ill-fortune; "ill omens"; "ill predictions"; "my words with inauspicious thunderings shook heaven"- P.B.Shelley; "a dead and ominous silence prevailed"; "a by-election at a time highly unpropitious for the Government" [syn: inauspicious, ominous]

ill

n. an often persistent bodily disorder or disease; a cause for complaining [syn: ailment, complaint]

ill

  1. adv. (`ill' is often used as a combining form) in a poor or improper or unsatisfactory manner; not well; "he was ill prepared"; "it ill befits a man to betray old friends"; "the car runs badly"; "he performed badly on the exam"; "the team played poorly"; "ill-fitting clothes"; "an ill-conceived plan" [syn: badly, poorly] [ant: well]

  2. unfavorably or with disapproval; "tried not to speak ill of the dead"; "thought badly of him for his lack of concern" [syn: badly] [ant: well]

  3. with difficulty or inconvenience; scarcely or hardly; "we can ill afford to buy a new car just now"

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

ill

c.1200, "morally evil" (other 13c. senses were "malevolent, hurtful, unfortunate, difficult"), from Old Norse illr "ill, bad," of unknown origin. Not considered to be related to evil. Main modern sense of "sick, unhealthy, unwell" is first recorded mid-15c., probably related to Old Norse idiom "it is bad to me." Slang inverted sense of "very good, cool" is 1980s. As a noun, "something evil," from mid-13c.

ill

early 13c., "to do evil to," from ill (adj.). Meaing "to speak disparagingly" is from 1520s. Related: Illed; illing.

ill

c.1200, "wickedly; with hostility;" see ill (adj.). Meaning "not well, poorly" is from c.1300. It generally has not shifted to the realm of physical sickess, as the adjective has done. Ill-fated recorded from 1710; ill-informed from 1824; ill-tempered from c.1600; ill-starred from c.1600. Generally contrasted with well, hence the useful, but now obsolete or obscure illcome (1570s), illfare (c.1300), and illth.

Wiktionary

ill

a. 1 (label en obsolete) evil; wicked (of people). (13th-19th c.) 2 (label en archaic) Morally reprehensible (of behaviour etc.); blameworthy. (from 13th c.) 3 Indicative of unkind or malevolent intentions; harsh, cruel. (from 14th c.) 4 Unpropitious, unkind, faulty, not up to reasonable standard. adv. Not well; imperfectly, badly; hardly. n. (context often pluralized English) trouble; distress; misfortune; adversity.

Usage examples of "ill".

Not long after his departure--that is, between eight and nine--the boy was taken ill and put into bed with all the violent symptoms which are invariably produced by that most deadly of vegetable poisons, aconitine, and he died at twenty minutes past eleven the same night.

I was especially happy whenever I was sent afield to take the place of some peasant shepherd who was ill or drunk or otherwise incapacitated, for I enjoyed being by myself in the green pastures, and the herding of sheep is no backbreaking job.

For all I know, she could be a contemporary Mata Han with a secret agenda that forebodes ill for the future Kappa Theta Eta alumnae pool.

When the whale is ill, the ambergris is formed--I suppose you could say it is no more complicated than the process by which phlegm is formed in your throat when you have a cold, and the whale coughs it up, or spews it out in the form of a liquid which hardens on exposure to the air.

Diane had fallen ill and had retired to her beautiful chateau of Anet which enhanced the beauty of the valley of the Eure and which Philibert Delorme had helped her to make one of the most magnificent examples of architecture in the country.

The Dowager, with a magnificent disregard for the coachman and the footman, perched on the box-seat in front of her, knew no such reticence, and discoursed with great freedom on the birth of an heir to the barony, animadverting with embarrassing candour, and all the contempt of a matriarch who had brought half-a-dozen children into the world without fuss or complications, on sickly young women who fancied themselves to be ill days before their time, and ended by suffering cross births and hard labours.

I am sure that they are indigestible, and that those who eat them undergo all the ills which the Revalenta Arabica is prepared to cure.

Bunsen cells, it will be precipitated in an arborescent brittle form, ill adapted for weighing.

Chopin, who was not very intellectual, felt ill at ease amongst all these literary men, these reformers, arguers and speechifiers.

Russian spaceflight pioneer Konstantin Tsiolkovsky argued a century ago that there must be bodies intermediate ill size between the observed large asteroids and those asteroidal fragments, the meteorites, that occasionally fall to Earth.

Then I was greatly astonied, because I could not tell what this new vision signified, or what the intent of the celestiall god was, doubting least the former Priests had given me ill counsell, and fearing that they had not faithfully instructed me : being in this manner as it were incensed the god Osiris appeared to me the night following, and giving me admonition said, There is no occasion why thou shouldest be afraid with so often order of religion, as though there were somewhat omitted, but that thou shouldest rather rejoyce, since as it hath pleased the gods to call thee three times, when as there was never yet any person that atchieved to the order but once : wherefore thou maist thinke thy selfe happy for so great benefits.

I am astonished that love, which is not a disease, should have made you ill, and that it should have exactly the opposite effect upon me.

There, too, standing near to her were the Khania Atene and her uncle the old Shaman, who looked but ill at ease, and lastly, stretched upon his funeral couch, the fiery light beating upon his stark form and face, lay the dead Khan, Rassen.

Amenartas prophesied of ill, so does Atene prophesy of ill, and Amenartas and Atene are one.

For the souls of the dead take it very ill and wreak their spite on the survivors, if their death is not avenged on their enemies.