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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

ice

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
black ice
▪ Driving conditions are dangerous, with black ice in many areas.
dry ice
fondant icing
▪ a cake decorated with fondant icing
glacé icing
ice a cakeBritish English, frost a cake American English (= cover a cake with fine sugar mixed with a liquid)
▪ She iced her own wedding cake.
Ice Age
ice bucket
ice cap
ice cream cone
ice cream parlor
ice cream
▪ vanilla ice cream
ice cube
ice fishing
ice floe
ice hockey
ice lolly
ice pack
ice pick
ice rink
ice sheet
ice skate
ice water
icing sugar
pack ice
sheet...ice
▪ A sheet of ice covered the lake.
the Ice Age (=one of the long periods of time, thousands of years ago, when ice covered many northern countries)
water ice
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
cold
▪ He's good and great, but as cold as ice.
▪ It was as cold as ice.
▪ She saw him clearly - arrogant as the devil and cold as ice, a ready-made adversary.
▪ Most of them had to cross a creek swollen with winter rains, and deadly cold with winter ice and snow.
▪ Obviously if it weren't cold the ice would melt.
▪ Very cold ice is very hard, and very cold permafrost is extraordinarily tough to cut through.
▪ His mind went cold as ice.
▪ Athelstan touched Rastani's hand which was as cold as ice.
dry
▪ Traditionally, this cooling requirement has been accomplished using slices of solid carbon dioxide, better known as dry ice.
▪ His thinning gray hair was the color of dry ice.
▪ And the quantity of dry ice they use, and how much flour the Nephilim have on their clothes!
▪ That would drive most of the adsorbed gases out of the surface dirt and evaporate the polar dry ice.
▪ Graham Gussin fills a factory with dry ice.
▪ Pain Teens open up in a cloud of dry ice that fills the stage and eventually leaks out on to the dance floor.
▪ After the dry ice had cleared for good, however, grumbles of disappointment could be heard rumbling from the Faust faithful.
▪ Using a combination of alcohol and dry ice, the firm has pioneered a safe and effective system to deter thieves.
polar
▪ Lake Vostok lies about 4000 metres beneath the polar ice.
▪ The use of polar ice to support such a ballistic-transportation scheme requires a substantial consumption of propellant along the way.
▪ Even the polar ice contains pesticide, for example.
▪ This astonishing discovery of polar ice on Mercury makes it clear that impacts play a major role on all the terrestrial planets.
▪ Adult males are nomadic, wandering all round the polar ice cap and living mainly off seals.
▪ With a yet slower rhythm than the polar ice, the tides of civilization ebbed and flowed across the galaxy.
▪ There is strong lobbying pressure for the governments that control portions of the polar ice caps not to build settlements there.
▪ During local spring in the polar regions, polar ice and perpetual sunlight may both be available simultaneously!
thin
▪ And that's fairly thin ice on which to skate one's credibility!
▪ The ground is frozen, thin ice covers the puddles between the furrows of the empty gray field.
▪ It had been granted grudgingly and she knew she was on thin ice as far as her superiors were concerned.
▪ Bush had the look of thin ice.
▪ There was water at the bottom covered by a thin skin of ice and he splashed into it face first.
▪ He was on thin ice before.
▪ Notices warning of the dangers of thin ice were put up in the last few days when the lake froze over.
■ NOUN
age
▪ Dole comes from an era as distant as the ice age.
▪ At that time, an ice age was ending, game animals were flourishing, and humans were relatively few.
▪ It is not hard to see how these two phenomena might, as it were, assist an ice age on its way.
▪ An ice age begins slowly, almost imperceptibly, when the average temperature drops by a few degrees.
▪ Sometimes they echo time-honoured memories of widespread flooding in the region following the end of the last ice age.
▪ On August 14 the green button on my phone console lit up for the first time in an ice age.
▪ But ice ages or no, millions of years of erosion will slowly flatten the planetary mineral heaps we call mountains.
▪ Some are warm and hospitable, while others can be nothing short of an ice age.
bucket
▪ Gouts of blood, on the bar towels, the ice bucket.
▪ Just forget about anyone wheeling a linen-covered table into your room with plates, silverware, wine glasses and ice buckets.
▪ There was an ice bucket in the middle and a bottle of chilled champagne.
▪ She was counting silver ice buckets for the do.
▪ What did she need ice buckets for?
▪ He reaches for the ice bucket and starts pouring the champagne.
cap
▪ As a result, ice caps are retreating.
▪ With the melting of the ice caps, it might just be an island.
▪ Whatever it is, it's melting the ice caps and we're all going to drown.
▪ These telescopes revealed ice caps at both poles of Mars and documented seasonal changes in color and contrast.
▪ Adult males are nomadic, wandering all round the polar ice cap and living mainly off seals.
▪ He may have seen the continental ice cap, raised by mirage.
▪ There is strong lobbying pressure for the governments that control portions of the polar ice caps not to build settlements there.
▪ Then the ice caps will be able to freeze again; it's a fail-safe mechanism.
cream
▪ Vivoli's sell the best ice cream in the world.
▪ With promises of endless ice cream when he awoke, Mama kissed her little son and bade him goodnight, sleep tight.
▪ We get ice cream every Friday - that's my treat.
▪ Available commercial ice creams differ in quality.
▪ What's this fly doing in my ice cream?
▪ Dessert may be chocolate crepes or homemade ice cream.
▪ Not to mention the ice cream and snacks obtained from one of the many kiosks situated along the promenade.
▪ He takes her to his friends' house and she learns how ice cream is hand made.
crystal
▪ This is crucial as the ice crystals formed when water freezes would destroy the egg tissues.
▪ Their creamy white bodies are covered with spiky white ice crystals.
▪ If it is frozen at different atmospheric pressures, the ice crystals formed are different.
▪ In fact water can form at least nine different types of ice crystal.
▪ The redhead's hair sparkled with tiny ice crystals.
▪ Frostbite is the effect of ice crystals forming within the skin.
▪ However, when ice crystals form, they will have definite positions and will be lined up in some direction.
▪ Scrubby bushes festooned with ice crystals which gleamed.
cube
▪ Add the ice cubes and chill for at least 1 hour.
▪ Karen took some ice cubes from the freezer and poured the soda.
▪ Cooking such small amounts of food can be fiddly and time consuming so try freezing baby-sized portions in ice cube trays.
▪ Or put some ice cubes in the sieve before straining the soup, Roraback suggests.
▪ Hannah had poured herself a dry Martini and put in ice cubes and lemon.
▪ The ice cubes will help to cool the soup and attract any fat globules.
▪ I improvised by putting colour into an ice cube tray - thus giving me deep wells and plenty of colour.
▪ I fetched ice cubes in the middle of the night to try to numb the backs of my legs.
field
▪ Andy and John are on an ice field in Zanskar now, toiling slowly up toward the monastery.
▪ Early in the programme a few specimens of achondrites were found in both the Allan Hills and Yamato ice fields.
▪ This ice field was steeper than the first, and twice as high.
hockey
▪ Swindon will go wild if their ice hockey team win promotion to the Premier League.
▪ And he loved apple juice and chewing gum and watching ice hockey games.
▪ The consortium is being headed by the manager of the ice hockey team.
▪ Its ice hockey team is one of the best in the country.
▪ Neither thought they would ever make a living from ice hockey.
▪ They've got some good cyclists, some good ice hockey players, but not many good unicycle hockey players.
▪ The signs look good for ice hockey in the Nineties.
pack
▪ Flotillas of tabular icebergs and ice islands sail among the pack ice.
▪ They penetrate south to varying degrees, blue and minke whales often appearing well south of the pack ice edge.
▪ Most adult male bears spend their lives out on the pack ice, living mainly on seals.
▪ The September-October northern limit of pack ice varies considerably from year to year.
▪ The pack ice and fast ice that spread over polar seas form vast sheets many hundreds of square kilometres in area.
pick
▪ Winter hunting equipment, for example-including snow goggles, ice picks, and harpoons-was stored in skin bags.
▪ It was as if ice picks had been driven into my ear.
▪ Blue Mooney squatted next to a pink-and-white Pontiac as he stabbed the ice pick into the fourth tire.
rink
▪ He got out of bed and fell to his knees on a floor that felt like an ice rink.
▪ She says her life revolved around the ice rink - she had to fit her personal life in around her skating.
▪ A permanent 5-inch thick ice rink is created at the beginning of the hockey season.
▪ Rudakov made an ice rink of the floor of his punishment cell.
▪ The company also supplies ice rinks and sport shops.
▪ The village boasts an ice rink, nursery ski school and boutiques, hotels and restaurants.
▪ Read in studio A company is being set-up to try to save an ice rink which was closed down two days ago.
sea
▪ The sea ice is now more than a metre thick.
▪ Also, one photo shows a large object that resembles an iceberg trapped in solid sea ice.
▪ How could sea ice come and go so quickly?
▪ Temperatures vary widely, with sea ice cover growing and shrinking by up to 30 percent over a few years.
▪ Ice monitors have been out drilling and measuring, and already the flat sea ice is strong enough to walk on.
▪ Even in the depths of winter the sea ice is never a complete cover.
▪ In ocean dynamics studies, important topics are heat storage, circulation and the role of sea ice.
▪ Their camp was on an island in the ice, and the sea ice moved sometimes.
sheet
▪ During the Pleistocene period, Britain's climate ranged from warm-temperate to very cold during the several advances of ice sheets.
▪ Thus the ice sheet would expand.
▪ No doubt the ice sheet preserves specimens that would weather away more quickly in other regions.
▪ The cutter rolls briefly as it splits an ice sheet the size of a suburban back yard.
▪ In the last one million years the ice sheets spread a layer of boulder clay across the lowlands.
▪ The tremendous weight of the ice sheet loaded and depressed that part of the lithosphere.
▪ These differences were caused first by ice sheets and later by rivers.
▪ As the snow accumulates from that little boreal patch, growing inexorably year after year, gargantuan ice sheets begin to form.
water
▪ I use them to make a Summer Pudding or a water ice.
▪ Most of their mass is ordinary water ice, and the rest is carbon-bearing rocky dust.
▪ Before external cooling with the use of water ice, temperature probes should be inserted to monitor the patient's temperature.
▪ Comets differ from asteroids in composition in that comets contain abundant water ice, and possibly other ices as well.
▪ For dessert, go for fresh fruit or water ice.
▪ It returned exciting evidence that suggests massive deposits of water ice in shadowed crater bottoms near the lunar poles.
■ VERB
break
▪ Humour Humour can be an excellent behaviour for easing tensions and breaking the ice between people.
▪ This gambit nevertheless breaks the ice, and they begin by discussing the merits of various brands of scotch.
▪ That always seems to happen when you break the ice.
▪ In the winter, she rose early to break the ice in the washing bowls.
▪ We broke the ice which held our relations in a paralysing grip.
▪ I have to break the ice with a long pole before I can lower a bucket into water.
▪ She helps break the ice when I am interviewing.
▪ To break the ice, the dorm leader asked us to tell the group what our favorite home-cooked meal was.
cut
▪ The fact it was an out-of-character performance for this season cut no ice.
▪ This introduction had cut the ice.
▪ High-sounding jargon or pointless platitudes cut little ice when one is alert to the actual message being conveyed.
▪ When they could, his companions cut ice and thawed it for water needed in the daily mass.
▪ None of which cut much ice with Manchester United, who controlled this match from start to finish without breaking sweat.
▪ But it was for a reason that would cut no ice with Jean-Claude and so I did not put it to him.
▪ We planned to cut ice bollards and ice threads to save our precious supply of abseil gear.
▪ This had always been the fall-back position, but at this late stage in the argument it cut no ice.
melt
▪ Whatever it is, it's melting the ice caps and we're all going to drown.
▪ Zwally observes that melting ice has flooded the Earth before.
▪ Which melts faster - the ice with the salt or the ice on its own?
▪ With the melting of the ice caps, it might just be an island.
▪ If you wanted to melt ice quickly you would heat it.
▪ If the temperature of the air is very, very cold, salt is not effective in melting ice.
▪ Granny felt the words in her head for several seconds, like little melting cubes of ice.
▪ Calcium chloride, another useful salt, will melt ice at even lower temperatures.
put
▪ The champagne has been put on ice at Stockton.
▪ Or put some ice cubes in the sieve before straining the soup, Roraback suggests.
▪ Never put ice in the drinks and don't let your kids eat ice cream.
▪ Meanwhile, fill the cup with water and put the ice cube in it. 2.
▪ But the sadness of the day put the celebrations on ice.
▪ Wherever they harvest the heart, it could be put on ice until we arrive.
▪ Worst affected is your love life, so expect dates to be cancelled or romantic liaisons to be put on ice.
▪ He took a long therapeutic swallow and put ice cubes in his mouth, crushing them between large molars.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be (walking/treading/skating) on thin ice
▪ He was on thin ice before.
▪ It had been granted grudgingly and she knew she was on thin ice as far as her superiors were concerned.
be skating on thin ice
break the ice
▪ I tried to break the ice by offering her a drink, but she said no.
▪ Humour Humour can be an excellent behaviour for easing tensions and breaking the ice between people.
▪ I have to break the ice with a long pole before I can lower a bucket into water.
▪ In the winter, she rose early to break the ice in the washing bowls.
▪ She helps break the ice when I am interviewing.
▪ That always seems to happen when you break the ice.
▪ This gambit nevertheless breaks the ice, and they begin by discussing the merits of various brands of scotch.
▪ To break the ice, the dorm leader asked us to tell the group what our favorite home-cooked meal was.
▪ We broke the ice which held our relations in a paralysing grip.
cut no ice/not cut much ice
ice-cream/funeral/tattoo parlour
snow/ice field
▪ Andy and John are on an ice field in Zanskar now, toiling slowly up toward the monastery.
▪ Cross-country skiing is very popular and cable cars and ski lifts take the skiers up to the snow fields.
▪ Early in the programme a few specimens of achondrites were found in both the Allan Hills and Yamato ice fields.
▪ This ice field was steeper than the first, and twice as high.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Drive carefully - there's ice on the road.
▪ There was hardly any ice in my Coke.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ He began hacking at the ice on the gauges and the air intakes.
▪ Lenses of rather pure ice are conceivable, but more likely is a permafrost containing 10 percent to 30 percent ice.
▪ The ground is frozen, thin ice covers the puddles between the furrows of the empty gray field.
▪ The icebox was packed with beer and he'd prepared a lobster salad that he'd left on ice.
▪ This was worse, with impossible moves on gritty walls and creaks and trickles from the cliffs of ice.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
over
▪ Parts of the Bristol Avon were iced over, resulting in the cancellation of the Bradford-On-Avon Open.
▪ Schools are closed, roads are iced over, rain has turned to sleet.
▪ The roads may have iced over, the rain may be too ugly to face.
up
▪ It would be prohibitively expensive to chop that ice up and ship it to needy regions.
■ NOUN
cake
▪ Gran did that, you know, as usual, and she made the cake and I've iced it.
▪ There they served one of the best cakes with chocolate icing I have ever had.
■ VERB
put
▪ We pay him to put icing on the cake, and tie him to us.
▪ A year ago, Holiday Inn put the icing on the cake at two of its Florida properties.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be (walking/treading/skating) on thin ice
▪ He was on thin ice before.
▪ It had been granted grudgingly and she knew she was on thin ice as far as her superiors were concerned.
ice-cream/funeral/tattoo parlour
snow/ice field
▪ Andy and John are on an ice field in Zanskar now, toiling slowly up toward the monastery.
▪ Cross-country skiing is very popular and cable cars and ski lifts take the skiers up to the snow fields.
▪ Early in the programme a few specimens of achondrites were found in both the Allan Hills and Yamato ice fields.
▪ This ice field was steeper than the first, and twice as high.
the icing on the cake
▪ A year ago, Holiday Inn put the icing on the cake at two of its Florida properties.
▪ And for the family business with such humble beginnings the expansion is just the icing on the cake.
▪ And just to put the icing on the cake he has named it Black Forest Chateau.
▪ Female speaker It's an added bonus, the icing on the cake.
▪ I would also endorse heartily our bikes, which provided the icing on the cake.
▪ Items such as these are the icing on the cake.
▪ The prospects of a change in government banking policy has been the icing on the cake.
▪ This is just the icing on the cake.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Kemp iced the game in the final five seconds by scoring two free throws.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Rookie Mike Miller iced the victory with two more free throws with 15 seconds to play.
Wikipedia

Ice (comics)

Ice (Tora Olafsdotter) is a fictional character, a comic book superheroine in publications from DC Comics. Created by Keith Giffen, J. M. DeMatteis, and Kevin Maguire, she first appeared in Justice League International #12 (April 1988).

Ice (band)

Ice is an industrial music band formed by guitarist Justin Broadrick and saxophonist/vocalist Kevin Martin.

Ice (Johnson novel)

Ice is a Christian science fiction novel by author Shane Johnson.

Ice (yacht)

Ice (Lights song)

"Ice" is the second single from Canadian singer-songwriter Lights from her debut album The Listening. It was released on October 12, 2009, in Canada. A different version of the song was also included on her debut self-titled EP.

Ice (Durst novel)

Ice is a novel written by Sarah Beth Durst, a modernized retelling of the Norwegian fairy tale East of the Sun and West of the Moon. It was a nominee for the Andre Norton Award in 2009.

ICE (cipher)

In cryptography, ICE (Information Concealment Engine) is a symmetric-key block cipher published by Kwan in 1997. The algorithm is similar in structure to DES, but with the addition of a key-dependent bit permutation in the round function. The key-dependent bit permutation is implemented efficiently in software. The ICE algorithm is not subject to patents, and the source code has been placed into the public domain.

ICE is a Feistel network with a block size of 64 bits. The standard ICE algorithm takes a 64-bit key and has 16 rounds. A fast variant, Thin-ICE, uses only 8 rounds. An open-ended variant, ICE-n, uses 16n rounds with 64n bit key.

Van Rompay et al. (1998) attempted to apply differential cryptanalysis to ICE. They described an attack on Thin-ICE which recovers the secret key using 2 chosen plaintexts with a 25% success probability. If 2 chosen plaintexts are used, the probability can be improved to 95%. For the standard version of ICE, an attack on 15 out of 16 rounds was found, requiring 2 work and at most 2 chosen plaintexts.

Ice (The X-Files)

"Ice" is the eighth episode of the first season of the American science fiction television series The X-Files, which premiered on the Fox network on November 5, 1993. It was directed by David Nutter and written by Glen Morgan and James Wong. The debut broadcast of "Ice" was watched by 10 million viewers in 6.2 million households and received positive reviews from critics, who praised its tense atmosphere.

The plot of the episode sees FBI special agents Fox Mulder ( David Duchovny) and Dana Scully ( Gillian Anderson) investigate the deaths of an Alaskan research team. Isolated and alone, the agents and their accompanying team discover the existence of extraterrestrial parasitic organisms which drive their hosts into impulsive fits of rage.

The episode was inspired by an article in Science News about an excavation in Greenland, and series creator Chris Carter also cited John W. Campbell's 1938 novella Who Goes There? as an influence. Although the producers hoped that "Ice" would save money by being shot in a single location, it ended up exceeding its production budget.

Ice (anime)

is a 2007 three-episode original video animation created by Yasushi Akimoto and directed by Makoto Kobayashi. It is set in the ruins of Tokyo in the near future, after an unspecified catastrophe has led to the death of all human males and many females. The small groups of women who survive face the impending extinction of humanity. There are suggestions that the disaster was caused by human interference with nature, possibly biological warfare experiments or genetic engineering.

Many of the survivors blame men's warlike nature and scientific arrogance for the catastrophe. However, even though men have perished, the women who remain are forced to use violence in the face of bioterrorism and other threats. While some accept their fate as the last generation of humans, others see biological engineering as a final hope for the survival of the species.

Ice (Sorokin novel)

Ice (, Lyod) is a 2002 novel by the Russian writer Vladimir Sorokin. The story is set in a brutal Russia of the near future, where the Tunguska meteor has provided a mysterious cult with a material which can make people's hearts speak. The book is the first written part of Sorokin's Ice Trilogy, although the second part in the narrative; it was followed by Bro in 2004 and 23,000 in 2006.

Ice (2003 film)

Ice is a 2003 Tamil romantic film directed by R. Raghuraj. The film starred Ashok and Priyanka Trivedi in the lead roles, while Vivek and Mouli appeared in other pivotal role. The film produced by, had music scored by Devi Sri Prasad. The film released in 2003 to below average collections and reviews.

Ice (1998 film)

Ice is a 1998 television disaster film starring Grant Show, Udo Kier, and Eva La Rue. The film has a similar premise as The Day After Tomorrow, a science fiction disaster film released six years later. Though completely in English, it first premiered in Germany in 1998 before being aired on ABC in the United States in 2000.

Ice (2011 miniseries)

Ice is a 2011 British miniseries directed by Nick Copus and based upon James Follett's novel with similar name. The miniseries has 2 episodes. Main roles are performed by Richard Roxburgh, Frances O'Connor and Claire Forlani.

Ice (Dukaj novel)

Ice is a Janusz A. Zajdel, European Union Prize for Literature and Kościelski awards-winning novel written in 2007 by the Polish science fiction writer Jacek Dukaj, published in Poland by Wydawnictwo Literackie. The novel mixes alternate history with science fiction elements, in particular, with alternative physics and logic.

Ice was supposed to be published in English by Atlantic Books in June 2012, but it has not happened so far. One of Reddit users reported that he or she corresponded with the publisher and received a confirmation that Atlantic Books is not "going ahead with this [Ice's] translation".

ICE (chemotherapy)

ICE in the context of chemotherapy is an acronym for one of the chemotherapy regimens, used in salvage treatment of relapsed or refractory non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma.

In case of CD20-positive B cell lymphoid malignancies the ICE regimen is often combined today with rituximab. This regimen is then called ICE-R or R-ICE or RICE.

[R]-ICE regimen consists of:

  1. (R)ituximab - an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, which is able to kill both normal and malignant CD20-bearing B cells;
  2. (I)fosfamide - an alkylating antineoplastic agent of the oxazafosforine group;
  3. (C)arboplatin - a platinum based drug, also with an alkylating mechanism;
  4. (E)toposide - a topoisomerase inhibitor.

Ice (Kelly Rowland song)

"Ice" is a song recorded by American singer-songwriter Kelly Rowland, featuring American rapper Lil Wayne. It was released on August 24, 2012. It was originally the lead single from Rowland's fourth studio album, Talk a Good Game (2013), however it did not make the album's final cut. The song was written by Rowland, Sean Garrett, Noel Fisher and Wayne, while the production was helmed by Garrett and Fisher. "Ice" is the third collaboration between Rowland and Wayne, following the Destiny's Child collaboration " Soldier" (2004), and her solo single " Motivation" (2011).

"Ice" is a midtempo R&B song, which features a thunderous beat, finger snaps and light synth riffs. In the song, Rowland instructs her male lover on how to properly use an ice cube on her naked body. "Ice" received positive reviews from music critics, who praised her sexy vocals and Rowland and Wayne for rekindling the magic of "Motivation". The song was moderately successful, reaching number 24 on the US Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart, and number 25 on the South Korea Gaon International Chart.

Ice (Nowra novel)

Ice is a 2008 novel by Australian novelist Louis Nowra.

ICE (FPGA)

iCE is the brand name used for a family of low-power FPGAs produced by Lattice Semiconductor. Parts in the family are marketed with the "world's smallest FPGA" tagline, and are intended for use in portable and battery-powered devices (such as mobile phones), where they would be used to offload tasks from the device's main processor or SoC. By doing so, the main processor and its peripherals can enter a low-power state or be powered off entirely, potentially increasing battery life.

Lattice received the iCE brand as part of its 2011 acquisition of SiliconBlue Technologies.

Ice (TV series)

Ice is an upcoming American television series created by Robert Munic and Antoine Fuqua. The project, set to air in late 2016 on Audience Network was ordered straight-to-series with an order of 10 episodes on August 2, 2016. The project has originally been ordered two years before but has been dropped for creative reasons.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Ice

Ice \Ice\ ([imac]s), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Iced ([imac]st); p. pr. & vb. n. Icing ([imac]"s[i^]ng).]

  1. To cover with ice; to convert into ice, or into something resembling ice.

  2. To cover with icing, or frosting made of sugar and milk or white of egg; to frost, as cakes, tarts, etc.

  3. To chill or cool, as with ice; to freeze.

Ice

Ice \Ice\ ([imac]s), n. [OE. is, iis, AS. [=i]s; aksin to D. ijs, G. eis, OHG. [=i]s, Icel. [=i]ss, Sw. is, Dan. iis, and perh. to E. iron.]

  1. Water or other fluid frozen or reduced to the solid state by cold; frozen water. It is a white or transparent colorless substance, crystalline, brittle, and viscoidal. Its specific gravity (0.92, that of water at 4[deg] C. being 1.0) being less than that of water, ice floats.

    Note: Water freezes at 32[deg] F. or 0[deg] Cent., and ice melts at the same temperature. Ice owes its cooling properties to the large amount of heat required to melt it.

  2. Concreted sugar.
    --Johnson.

  3. Water, cream, custard, etc., sweetened, flavored, and artificially frozen.

  4. Any substance having the appearance of ice; as, camphor ice. Anchor ice, ice which sometimes forms about stones and other objects at the bottom of running or other water, and is thus attached or anchored to the ground. Bay ice, ice formed in bays, fiords, etc., often in extensive fields which drift out to sea. Ground ice, anchor ice. Ice age (Geol.), the glacial epoch or period. See under Glacial. Ice anchor (Naut.), a grapnel for mooring a vessel to a field of ice. --Kane. Ice blink [Dan. iisblink], a streak of whiteness of the horizon, caused by the reflection of light from ice not yet in sight. Ice boat.

    1. A boat fitted with skates or runners, and propelled on ice by sails; an ice yacht.

    2. A strong steamboat for breaking a channel through ice.

      Ice box or Ice chest, a box for holding ice; a box in which things are kept cool by means of ice; a refrigerator.

      Ice brook, a brook or stream as cold as ice. [Poetic]
      --Shak.

      Ice cream [for iced cream], cream, milk, or custard, sweetened, flavored, and frozen.

      Ice field, an extensive sheet of ice.

      Ice float, Ice floe, a sheet of floating ice similar to an ice field, but smaller.

      Ice foot, shore ice in Arctic regions; an ice belt.
      --Kane.

      Ice house, a close-covered pit or building for storing ice.

      Ice machine (Physics), a machine for making ice artificially, as by the production of a low temperature through the sudden expansion of a gas or vapor, or the rapid evaporation of a volatile liquid.

      Ice master. See Ice pilot (below).

      Ice pack, an irregular mass of broken and drifting ice.

      Ice paper, a transparent film of gelatin for copying or reproducing; papier glac['e].

      Ice petrel (Zo["o]l.), a shearwater ( Puffinus gelidus) of the Antarctic seas, abundant among floating ice.

      Ice pick, a sharp instrument for breaking ice into small pieces.

      Ice pilot, a pilot who has charge of a vessel where the course is obstructed by ice, as in polar seas; -- called also ice master.

      Ice pitcher, a pitcher adapted for ice water.

      Ice plow, a large tool for grooving and cutting ice.

Wiktionary

ice

n. (context uncountable English) water in frozen (solid) form. vb. 1 To cool with ice, as a beverage. 2 To become ice, to freeze. 3 (context slang English): To murder. 4 To cover with icing (frosting made of sugar and milk or white of egg); to frost; as cakes, tarts, etc. 5 (context ice hockey English) To put out a team for a match. 6 (context ice hockey English) To shoot the puck the length of the playing surface, causing a stoppage in play called icing.

WordNet

ice

  1. v. decorate with frosting; "frost a cake" [syn: frost]

  2. put ice on or put on ice; "Ice your sprained limbs"

ice

  1. n. water frozen in the solid state; "Americans like ice in their drinks" [syn: water ice]

  2. the frozen part of a body of water

  3. diamonds; "look at the ice on that dame!" [syn: sparkler]

  4. a flavored sugar topping used to coat and decorate cakes [syn: frosting, icing]

  5. a frozen dessert with fruit flavoring (especially one containing no milk) [syn: frappe]

  6. amphetamine used in the form of a crystalline hydrochloride; used as a stimulant to the nervous system and as an appetite suppressant [syn: methamphetamine, methamphetamine hydrochloride, Methedrine, meth, deoxyephedrine, chalk, chicken feed, crank, glass, shabu, trash]

  7. a heat engine in which combustion occurs inside the engine rather than in a separate furnace; heat expands a gas that either moves a piston or turns a gas turbine [syn: internal-combustion engine]

  8. a rink with a floor of ice for ice hockey or ice skating; "the crowd applauded when she skated out onto the ice" [syn: ice rink, ice-skating rink]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

ice

Old English is "ice" (also the name of the rune for -i-), from Proto-Germanic *isa- (cognates: Old Norse iss, Old Frisian is, Dutch ijs, German Eis), with no certain cognates beyond Germanic, though possible relatives are Avestan aexa- "frost, ice," isu- "frosty, icy;" Afghan asai "frost." Slang meaning "diamonds" is attested from 1906.\n

\nIce cube attested from 1904. Ice age attested from 1832. To break the ice "to make the first opening to any attempt" is from 1580s, metaphoric of making passages for boats by breaking up river ice though in modern use usually with implications of "cold reserve."

ice

c.1400, ysen, "cover with ice," from ice (n.). Related: Iced; icing.

Usage examples of "ice".

This was nothing unusual, however, so Mary simply broke through the ice and began her morning ablutions, gratefully noticing that gentle movement reduced the soreness in her wrists.

The snowflakes had become fine and dry, almost like bits of ice, and they seemed to be abrading the world, smoothing it the way that sandpaper smoothed wood, until eventually there would be no peaks and valleys, nothing but a featureless, highly polished plain as far as anyone could see.

His plans would have to be drastically altered if Achar remained in the grip of ice.

I could sense his power and he, unlike Adeem, had fire and ice beneath his aura.

Because wanting to convince anyone that there was no Amadis in the world or any of the adventuring knights who fill the histories, is the same as trying to persuade that person that the sun does not shine, ice is not cold, and the earth bears no crops, for what mind in the world can persuade another that the story of Princess Floripes and Guy de Bourgogne is not true, or the tale of Fierabras and the Bridge of Mantible, which occurred in the time of Charlemagne, and is as true as the fact that it is now day?

Beats on his struggling form, which sinks at length Prone, and the aereal ice clings over it.

They also favour certain plants for living quarters, among them agapanthus, lilies, irises, ice plants, ivy, nasturtiums, jasmine and strawberries.

The food industry used thin agarose as an ingredient stablizer to make jelly, ice cream, whipped desserts, and other products.

At night, when everybody was asleep, he and the famous airman Lyapidevsky found and rescued the Chelyuskin expedition, and with Vodopyanov he landed heavy aircraft on the pack ice at the North Pole, arid with Chkalov opened the unexplored air route to the United States across the Pole.

Twice each day, the hydrobot returned from its journey to inner space and delivered its real treasure: one-hundred-milliliter aliquots of ice containing a dizzying menagerie of microscopic life never before seen.

She or he would be drinking in heroic fashion, perhaps yards of real Earth ale, shooting them back with raw alk boiling in dry ice.

We had quite enough to do to prevent ourselves from being served in the same ruthless fashion, and now and then, in the more violent gusts of wind, were glad to stick our alpenstocks into the ice and hold on hard.

Ice Tongue in my newly healed hand, but I was not ambidextrous in battle.

Rubber Bible to hand as the fearless author juggles with triple points or the properties of ammonial ice eutectics.

When I was living with Dad on Westchester Lagoon in Anchorage they used to come sliding in on the lagoon before the ice melted.