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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

hut

noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a beach hut (=a small building on the beach for storing things such as swimming or sports equipment)
▪ a row of brightly painted beach huts
Quonset hut
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
little
▪ He walked down the path to the little hut.
▪ All those little gestures formed hut a background to the real art of seduction.
▪ He had a little hut with a stone floor, and a supply of handles and twigs.
▪ And there was the little hut ... He didn't know himself what he meant by that ... Wycliffian dialectic.
▪ In the inhabitants' little huts or dilapidated houses?
▪ There was Stanley, one-handed Stanley, hook-handed Stanley, listening in his little hut to his radio.
▪ He was sitting in the little hut where you bought your tickets to get on to the Big Wheel.
▪ She could see one now, hurrying through the herb garden to the little hut where they worked.
old
▪ The path eventually emerges at an old fishing hut on the shore of Loch Avich.
small
▪ Soon I saw a small hut where an old man was cooking his breakfast over a fire.
▪ A hard dirt path leads into the village past a cluster of small bamboo huts.
▪ And at the bottom of the dip stood a small stone hut with a broken-backed roof.
tiny
▪ She looked again at the tiny hut.
▪ Wealth, culture, and international adventure had turned a tiny collection of huts into a huge sandstone metropolis.
▪ She felt the tremor of their footsteps first, and it was as though the tiny hut quaked at their arrival.
wooden
▪ There are also some wooden huts and everything is fenced in to keep out the wolves and curious locals.
▪ Inside there were some long wooden huts which occupied almost all the space.
▪ This is a direct transference to stone or brick building of the primitive wooden hut method mentioned earlier. 2.
▪ Above them, little wooden huts were perched in higher meadows.
▪ This was a wooden hut in which there was some old machinery that generated electricity for the house.
▪ He lives in a glorious wooden hut with several equally attractive out-buildings.
▪ I decided against looking into the tumbledown wooden hut that had once housed the coal hopper controls.
▪ It came from a wooden hut at the edge of a field.
■ NOUN
bamboo
▪ Carey set to work clearing the jungle and erecting a little bamboo hut with fences to keep out tigers!
▪ A hard dirt path leads into the village past a cluster of small bamboo huts.
▪ The hostages had been kept in mud and bamboo huts in a mosquito-infested swamp area.
▪ At one time they had to dive out of the bamboo hut in which they were sheltering when a gunfight erupted.
mountain
▪ Money raised will go towards building a mountain hut, with disabled access, in the Lake District National Park.
▪ Most continental high mountain areas are well served by networks of mountain huts and refuges, usually offering dormitory accommodation.
▪ He took me to a mountain hut where he lit a fire.
mud
▪ To our western eyes as he stood in his raggy, holed clothes in front of his mud hut he would appear very poor.
▪ Cataracts launched them downriver before they had time to think; waves like mud huts threw them eight feet into the air.
▪ In a mud hut on an endless plain, she sorted through the bones of unrecognizable animals.
▪ Its architecture consists of round, thatched mud huts set off by straw fences.
▪ The geography of evil: tunnels and bamboo thickets and mud huts and graves.
▪ The mud hut that calls itself a hospital contains nothing but flies.
▪ Kamilo said her mud hut had been entered just a few days earlier by thieves who stole her only bedsheet.
■ VERB
build
▪ Environmental impacts have been minimised by using local woods and grasses to build the huts and the comfortable lounge and bar area.
▪ Assume that the skipper can catch a fish dinner in 10 hours and build a thatched hut in 20.
▪ The volunteers built thatched huts, and citizens of Stamford, dressed as Bohemian villagers, arrived to inhabit them.
▪ Since building a hut is a smaller sacrifice for the skipper, he should build huts.
▪ She points out which fungi they ate, as well as which woods were used in the building of huts and canoes.
▪ She and her husband and six children are struggling to build a one-room mud hut on the grounds of the camp.
live
▪ He earns $ 15 a month and lives in a dark hut on the zoo grounds.
▪ People lived in makeshift huts fashioned of petrol drums and torn parachutes, of wood, tin, and rice sacks.
▪ Marion was living in a hut up on the moor.
▪ He has lived in his rickety hut for most of his fifty years.
▪ People lived in one hut, in a group.
▪ Kitty had lived in huts such as these and around these woods for more than fifty years.
▪ They drilled with one of the groups out there, living in open huts made of eucalyptus logs and assorted vines.
reach
▪ We had reached the hut and I didn't know what to do.
▪ Christine reached the hut from the road by a steep track through the scrub and so avoided the house.
▪ It was a long bus-ride to reach those low huts standing behind the high fence.
▪ Backpacking the route also offers security against not reaching a hut.
thatched
▪ If I come back in another ten years I may well find only donkeys in thatched huts.
▪ Assume that the skipper can catch a fish dinner in 10 hours and build a thatched hut in 20.
▪ Its architecture consists of round, thatched mud huts set off by straw fences.
▪ The volunteers built thatched huts, and citizens of Stamford, dressed as Bohemian villagers, arrived to inhabit them.
▪ Tall bamboos appeared beside the highway again, and a settlement with low wooden shops, and thatched huts like haystacks.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ At last there was the hut, crouched near its grove of hives.
▪ He walked down the path to the little hut.
▪ In one sense, nobody at the zoo lost a job, hut in another sense everyone did.
▪ It was a visionary move for a city of 500 residents, huddled around adobe huts in Old Town.
▪ She did it not to scare me, hut to teach me the facts of life.
▪ The next day we were informed that we weren't allowed to use the huts again.
▪ There are also some wooden huts and everything is fenced in to keep out the wolves and curious locals.
▪ To our western eyes as he stood in his raggy, holed clothes in front of his mud hut he would appear very poor.
Wikipedia

Hut (disambiguation)

A hut is a small and crude shelter.

Hut or The Hut may also refer to:

Hut

A hut is a primitive dwelling, which may be constructed of various local materials. Huts are a type of vernacular architecture because they are built of readily available materials such as wood, snow, ice, stone, grass, palm leaves, branches, hides, fabric, and/or mud using techniques passed down through the generations.

A hut is a shape of a lower quality than a house (durable, well built dwelling) but higher quality than a shelter (place of refuge or safety) such as a tent and is used as temporary or seasonal shelter or in primitive societies as a permanent dwelling.

Huts exist in practically all nomadic cultures. Some huts are transportable and can stand most conditions of weather.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

hut

1650s, from French hutte "cottage" (16c.), from Middle High German hütte "cottage, hut," probably from Proto-Germanic *hudjon-, related to the root of Old English hydan "to hide," from PIE *keudh-, from root (s)keu- (see hide (n.1)). Apparently first in English as a military word. Old Saxon hutta, Danish hytte, Swedish hytta, Frisian and Middle Dutch hutte, Dutch hut are from High German.

Wiktionary

hut

Etymology 1 n. 1 a small wooden shed 2 a primitive dwelling vb. 1 (context rare archaic transitive English) To put into a hut. 2 (context rare dated intransitive English) To take shelter in a hut. Etymology 2

interj. (cx American football English) Called by the quarterback to prepare the team for a play.

WordNet

hut

  1. n. temporary military shelter [syn: army hut, field hut]

  2. small crude shelter used as a dwelling [syn: hovel, hutch, shack, shanty]

The Collaborative International Dictionary

hut

hep \hep\ (h[e^]p), interj. A call used by drill instructors to count cadence during marching; used identically to hut and hup.

Usage examples of "hut".

Down in the village decisions were made, things were done, life went on in the knowledge that in her old wheeled shepherding hut on the hills Granny Aching was there, watching.

Granny Aching died, the men had cut and lifted the turf around the hut and stacked it neatly some way away.

Approached from the desert Alcazar appeared to be a plain pinnacle of stone, hut a natural vertical crack in its northern face led into an inner central courtyyard open to the sky above.

Strangers were among them, leading Gavving and Alfin toward the big hut.

A small human hut was to be seen next to - and little to be distinguished from - an ancipital hut.

About twenty yards from the hut where Arabin had passed the night, was a large, and, for the Bush, respectable-looking cottage.

It would protect about three arpents of land, enough to build huts on for everyone.

Even in the hut which Wedelmann shared with Asch the noiseless burning of the fire in the grate made one uneasy.

The fairly brusque encounter which had taken place between Sergeant Asch and Captain Witterer in the telephone hut had quickly gone the rounds.

She looked around the interior of the room again as Ashe laid a fire with the wet branches he had found behind the hut.

Presently I heard a discreet tapping on the doorboard of the hut which I at once removed, wriggling swiftly through the hole, careless in my misery as to whether I met an assegai the other side of it or not.

There were TV aerials sticking up out of these Than huts made out I of wood, atap, and mud.

Also he said that it was better to live on watercresses with an easy mind, however angry they might make your stomach, than to dwell in a big hut with a couple of cross women, which is what would have happened to you, Baas, if you had stopped at Walloo.

Some time during the cruise their bread supply failed, and Ragnar steered his vessel into the port of Spangarhede, where he bade his men carry their flour ashore and ask the people in a hut which he descried there to help them knead and bake their bread.

This large hut, eighteen feet wide by twenty-three feet long, yielded a fairly large quantity of coarse black and brown pottery, one badly corroded bronze bangle, and two small fragments of celadon china.